Weekly cost of food? - VeggieBoards
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#1 Old 07-10-2015, 05:19 PM
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Post Weekly cost of food?

How much, per person, do you spend on groceries a week?

I know it is a personal question, but I want to get actual numbers of a vegan diet grocery bill compared to a meat eater bill. I think that a "vegan diet is so expensive" argument is controversial and I want to see how it turns out.

Typically the larger the amount of people you feed, the lower money spent per person, which I understand.

So, how many people in your family follow a vegan diet? Have you been told by a meat eater that vegan diets are expensive?

The average amount of money spent on food according to the USDA:
http://www.cnpp.usda.gov/sites/defau...oodMay2015.pdf
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#2 Old 07-10-2015, 05:35 PM
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Vegan diets are every bit as varied as those of omnivores.
I'd say I average 40 dollars weekly along with my stock of dried beans and grains.

Omnivores think of 'organics' and the specialty section in stores as what vegans eat. The section of my regular grocery with the Boca and Gardien has more grass fed beef and organic chicken than veg'n

So many people now even think gluten free is a vegan thing!

Even when you think of processed vegan foods they still cost the same as meats.
If you eat whole food you should spend far less as a vegan, even with many organic foods
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#3 Old 07-10-2015, 05:42 PM
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Even when you think of processed vegan foods they still cost the same as meats.
If you eat whole food you should spend far less as a vegan, even with many organic foods
I personally think whole foods is cheaper since you're not buying that expensive stuff, and I'm allergic to most of it anyways. And my rule with organic is if it isn't local, then I'll buy frozen or regular stuff. It's my way of supporting local farmers. Plus when it comes from a few miles away, it's fresh, ripe, and generally cheaper.
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#4 Old 07-10-2015, 05:45 PM
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I spend about $80 a week on my raw foods and about $30 on "other" foods for my husband (he's an omni). In all fairness, he does eat some of the veggies/fruits too and so does my parrot, so it's not ALL for me lol. It's a lot to spend on food for 2 people, I know, but I go without a lot of other luxuries because I value my health more than seeing movies or or buying lots of clothes or makeup/beauty products/hair cuts or getting a new phone every year or whatever else people spend money on unnecessarily. All the stuff others spend on, I don't and use that $$$ for good food
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#5 Old 07-10-2015, 05:46 PM
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I buy for 2 adults, 2 kids (one in pullups), and 2 pets. I include paper products (TP,paper towels) and laundry soap/shampoo/deodorant/toothpaste etc...In my weekly grocery budget.

I average about $100 per week.
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#6 Old 07-10-2015, 05:49 PM
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I buy for 2 adults, 2 kids (one in pullups), and 2 pets. I include paper products (TP,paper towels) and laundry soap/shampoo/deodorant/toothpaste etc...In my weekly grocery budget.

I average about $100 per week.
wow that's pretty good! Do you buy any particular (non-dairy) milks?
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#7 Old 07-10-2015, 06:50 PM
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I also average about $100 per week for myself and my husband. I only eat out maybe five times per year at most. I make almost all my food homemade, very little of the prepared meals, though I might treat myself to a vegan yogurt or two each week and I buy plant milks. Most of the time I make my own bread (and also grind my own flour from seed using my Blendtec) but occasionally I buy Ezekiel if I know I will not have time to make bread. I used to make my own flaxseed milk for a while but got lazy. Beans are a huge staple for me, as are squashes, leafy greens, millet, rices, and buckwheat.

It's hard to say if I spend more now than when I was an omnivore because I have been vegan for a number of years and the cost of food has increased dramatically. So I couldn't compare to then. But I DO remember buying wild caught salmon or tilapia and organic Greek yogurt back in the day and that stuff was in no way cheap!

Like Kiwibird, I find other ways to save money so I can have quality food. I buy my clothes mostly second hand, do not wear makeup, cycle to work often instead of driving, etc.
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#8 Old 07-11-2015, 01:57 AM
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wow that's pretty good! Do you buy any particular (non-dairy) milks?
I buy silk brand non dairy milks most often, because that is the only non dairy milk that is carried locally. If I am out of town, I will buy a cheaper store brand.

I dont grind my own flour/bake my own bread/other cool stuff. I just read the ingredients on bread loaves in my store (which carries 4 brands of bread) until I found one that I was happy with. We use sara lee brand bread and buns.

I order mori nu tofu through amazon, with their prime program. I just got a case of 12 boxes of shelf stable tofu for under ten bucks, shipped. I also order wowbutter (which is a peanut butter alternative) online.
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#9 Old 07-11-2015, 06:07 AM
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I spend about $80 per week on groceries for me and my husband. We are both vegetarian and he eat vegan meals with me at home. He will include cheese or eggs if we are eating out of the house and those items are available.
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#10 Old 07-11-2015, 06:13 AM
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One thing I forgot to mention is the cost of living is different dependent on where you live in the U.S., so it is like comparing apples and oranges. When I visited south Texas in 2013 for a week, I bought all my groceries for the week down there. I was staying at a hotel with a kitchenette and using my parent's in law's camper kitchen too. I bought beans, rice, vegetables and fruits and a few nuts and some oats and peanut butter. I also found naturally vegan tortillas. I remember buying all that stuff (I didn't eat out a single time except to buy a few token items at the airports during travel) and the clerk ringing it up and it came to like $30 or something. I read the receipt and asked the clerk if he was sure he rang it up right lol. Up here in NE Minnesota, that stuff would have cost me double that easily. But then, I don't know what the rate of pay runs for relative to the cost of living in Texas compared to Minnesota either. Housing up here is ridiculously expensive, but I suspect pay is greater than other areas too?

And the number and quantity of fruits and vegetables that can be grown in Texas far surpases that up here. To grow some vegetation all winter up here requires special greenhouses and equipment. that coupled with importing/exporting fruits and vegetables from afar factors into cost also I imagine (I was a mediocre student in Economics 21 years ago so forgive me for my crude theories lol).
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Last edited by Naturebound; 07-11-2015 at 06:16 AM.
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#11 Old 07-11-2015, 08:53 AM
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Just for myself I spend around 60-80 a week on groceries fruits and fresh veggies add up particularly when cherries are 3 per pound they're in season though so I get them a anyway
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#12 Old 07-11-2015, 09:03 AM
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God I spend way more than you guys! I am not rich or a good budgeter, sadly. I eat lunch at the work cafe several times a week (supporting vegan options )

I buy for 3, all vegans, son is 22, strong, and an athlete. Husband is 6'2. I am little but love good food and organic produce.

We get a $55 box of organic produce delivered weekly. Plus staples and frozen stuff to purchase And $$ but delicious vegan bakery bread. I can't even estimate lol.

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#13 Old 07-11-2015, 09:04 AM
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Just for myself I spend around 60-80 a week on groceries fruits and fresh veggies add up particularly when cherries are 3 per pound they're in season though so I get them a anyway
Omg I just ate a huge bowl of cherries last night!!
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#14 Old 07-11-2015, 10:09 AM
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For just myself, $25 per week on a 2,600 Calorie/day diet. But much of that is due to luxury goods (apples and curry spice, etc.).
I get my basic staples in 25 lb sacks, they cost $10.50 per week. I could live just on that and with a couple months advanced notice I could easily get that below $8.75 if I needed to.
I have my own organic garden where I breed my own plants and manufacture fertilizers on site for free, my yearly garden budget is always kept below $50. This year it was just $16. My garden supplies essentially all my vegetables, beverages, medicines, and most spices.
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#15 Old 07-11-2015, 10:14 AM
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Beans and grains are incredibly cheap. When I first became vegan, my grocery bill was only $10 to $15 per week, and the price of beans and grains has not changed much since then. By going to Asian or Latino supermarkets, you can buy fresh vegetables inexpensively. Even Costco sells soymilk, so it's pretty cheap also.

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Specific recommendations for a healthy diet include: eating more fruit, vegetables, legumes, nuts and grains; cutting down on salt, sugar and fats. It is also advisable to choose unsaturated fats, instead of saturated fats and towards the elimination of trans-fatty acids."
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#16 Old 07-11-2015, 10:45 AM
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We spend about £20 per person usually, but this week we spent only around £5 per person because we had no choice. That's, I think, about $30 and $7 in US currency. We shop at the discount grocery and this time we bought pasta, rice, broccoli, courgettes, onions, four cans of beans, a loaf of bread, soya milk, frozen hash browns, one can of mushy peas, one can of sliced mushrooms, two litres of fruit juice, a 3-pack of paper towels, and a bottle of shower gel for around £11/$15. Normally we spend more because we buy cereal, biscuits, chocolate, vegetarian sausages, fruit and nuts, cleaning products, and my husband's dairy yogurt and cheese. This is why I roll my eyes when people say that veganism is only for the rich. We're living well below the poverty line, I'm 7 months pregnant, and we still eat enough healthy vegan food on our limited budget.
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#17 Old 07-11-2015, 11:31 AM
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For just myself, $25 per week on a 2,600 Calorie/day diet. But much of that is due to luxury goods (apples and curry spice, etc.).
I get my basic staples in 25 lb sacks, they cost $10.50 per week. I could live just on that and with a couple months advanced notice I could easily get that below $8.75 if I needed to.
I have my own organic garden where I breed my own plants and manufacture fertilizers on site for free, my yearly garden budget is always kept below $50. This year it was just $16. My garden supplies essentially all my vegetables, beverages, medicines, and most spices.
Where do you live? That is pretty cheap especially for someone eating 2600 calories a day. And how big is your garden? Typically for my supplies, I'm only buying seeds.
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#18 Old 07-11-2015, 11:37 AM
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We spend about £20 per person usually, but this week we spent only around £5 per person because we had no choice. That's, I think, about $30 and $7 in US currency. We shop at the discount grocery and this time we bought pasta, rice, broccoli, courgettes, onions, four cans of beans, a loaf of bread, soya milk, frozen hash browns, one can of mushy peas, one can of sliced mushrooms, two litres of fruit juice, a 3-pack of paper towels, and a bottle of shower gel for around £11/$15. Normally we spend more because we buy cereal, biscuits, chocolate, vegetarian sausages, fruit and nuts, cleaning products, and my husband's dairy yogurt and cheese. This is why I roll my eyes when people say that veganism is only for the rich. We're living well below the poverty line, I'm 7 months pregnant, and we still eat enough healthy vegan food on our limited budget.
Europe sells their products for a very cheap price. I think it would be very very hard to get that stuff at the same price in the US. Being below the poverty line in some places of the U.S. means a food desert and barely enough money to buy groceries. You would be considered well off compared to them. Government is feeding corporate companies instead of it's people here, which is very sad, since a third of the population is below the poverty line and you have to be almost homeless to be approved for government help.
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#19 Old 07-11-2015, 11:45 AM
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Europe sells their products for a very cheap price. I think it would be very very hard to get that stuff at the same price in the US. Being below the poverty line in some places of the U.S. means a food desert and barely enough money to buy groceries. You would be considered well off compared to them. Government is feeding corporate companies instead of it's people here, which is very sad, since a third of the population is below the poverty line and you have to be almost homeless to be approved for government help.
Oh, I'm American, so I absolutely get that! I've only been here for a few months. I do think it's significantly easier to shop for groceries on a tight budget in the UK, but I was also quite poor when I lived in Georgia (minimum wage, part-time job) and I still managed to eat a healthy vegan diet comprised primarily of pasta and vegetables, so I still don't buy the line that it's cheaper to eat meat and dairy than to eat vegan, even in the poorer parts of the US.
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#20 Old 07-11-2015, 02:39 PM
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Well I do all the grocery shopping - because otherwise there would be no food in the house - for me and the omni fiance. My diet is 95% vegan at present and my "half" of the bill is much smaller than his.

Eating vegan or vegetarian is much cheaper in the UK than eating as an omnivore. My food costs about £15 per week for my home food (including shared items like bread, plant milks, vegetables) and then I spend another £10 on work food (lunch). However about £20 of the weekly shop is for the omnivore in the house - and that's just the items that he eats and that I don't, it doesn't include vegetables or tinned food or any shared items.

However - if you buy ready meals then that price difference evens out. Vegetarian/vegan ready meals are not that much cheaper (and sometimes more expensive) than omnivore foods containing meat.
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#21 Old 07-11-2015, 07:08 PM
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Where do you live? That is pretty cheap especially for someone eating 2600 calories a day. And how big is your garden? Typically for my supplies, I'm only buying seeds.
Southeast washington. I shop at WinCo to get my staples. Brown rice is about $14.25 per 25 lbs, rolled oats about $16.50, dry beans $19, whole wheat flour $21 for a 50 lb sack (yes, I had to lift weights to become vegan ). At winco 2,600 Calories of whole wheat flour costs $0.71 and brown rice is $0.88 A couple other nearby stores have close to as good of prices on equally big bags.
My garden is 2800 sq ft, but that includes a bunch of cacti and a excessive amount of medicinals... I experiment with medicines as a hobby so getting sick is entertaining. But the largest portion of my garden is veggies and I harvest them fresh 10-11 months a year. I'm breeding new plants to close that gap.
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#22 Old 07-11-2015, 10:35 PM
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Southeast washington. I shop at WinCo to get my staples. Brown rice is about $14.25 per 25 lbs, rolled oats about $16.50, dry beans $19, whole wheat flour $21 for a 50 lb sack (yes, I had to lift weights to become vegan ). At winco 2,600 Calories of whole wheat flour costs $0.71 and brown rice is $0.88 A couple other nearby stores have close to as good of prices on equally big bags.
My garden is 2800 sq ft, but that includes a bunch of cacti and a excessive amount of medicinals... I experiment with medicines as a hobby so getting sick is entertaining. But the largest portion of my garden is veggies and I harvest them fresh 10-11 months a year. I'm breeding new plants to close that gap.
That is very impressive. I would be interested in hearing about your successful medicinals, I love that kind of thing.
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#23 Old 07-12-2015, 02:57 PM
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God I spend way more than you guys! I am not rich or a good budgeter, sadly. I eat lunch at the work cafe several times a week (supporting vegan options )

I buy for 3, all vegans, son is 22, strong, and an athlete. Husband is 6'2. I am little but love good food and organic produce.

We get a $55 box of organic produce delivered weekly. Plus staples and frozen stuff to purchase And $$ but delicious vegan bakery bread. I can't even estimate lol.

I get excited when my bill rings up under $200/wk. but that includes everything, paper products, toiletries, cleaning products, as well as food for three adults and five cats.


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#24 Old 07-16-2015, 12:23 PM
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Good question. I think a lot depends on what type of vegan diet you eat and what you buy and also where you live. For example, if I decided to go raw vegan, I would have a much cheaper grocery bill if I lived in California than here in Texas, even though CA is way more expensive than TX just because the produce in the CA supermarket (non-organic, that is) is much cheaper than in TX (where I am, at least). When I was living in San Francisco, I could get red bell peppers for $0.99 a pound on a regular basis, which would be about 2 big ones. Here in West Texas, it costs $1.99 EACH (I kid you not). And the ones in SF were beautiful and crisp, not like the wimpy ones here (can you tell I miss SF???)

For myself, I buy for one single person and I buy quite a bit of frozen veggies (because I'm on a tight budget) rather than fresh. I don't buy too many packaged foods, though, but I do buy quite a lot of canned beans (too lazy to make the dry ones). My bill ends up being about $45-$50. Because of my budget, I've had to cut down on the type of fresh veggies I love (like buying iceberg lettuce instead of romaine and Roma tomatoes instead of grape tomatoes). But my financial situation should be looking up in another few months and so I should have more to spend on groceries and I plan on getting the stuff I really love and also more fresh veggies and fruits.

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#25 Old 07-16-2015, 12:30 PM
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One thing I forgot to mention is the cost of living is different dependent on where you live in the U.S., so it is like comparing apples and oranges. When I visited south Texas in 2013 for a week, I bought all my groceries for the week down there. I was staying at a hotel with a kitchenette and using my parent's in law's camper kitchen too. I bought beans, rice, vegetables and fruits and a few nuts and some oats and peanut butter. I also found naturally vegan tortillas. I remember buying all that stuff (I didn't eat out a single time except to buy a few token items at the airports during travel) and the clerk ringing it up and it came to like $30 or something. I read the receipt and asked the clerk if he was sure he rang it up right lol. Up here in NE Minnesota, that stuff would have cost me double that easily. But then, I don't know what the rate of pay runs for relative to the cost of living in Texas compared to Minnesota either. Housing up here is ridiculously expensive, but I suspect pay is greater than other areas too?

And the number and quantity of fruits and vegetables that can be grown in Texas far surpases that up here. To grow some vegetation all winter up here requires special greenhouses and equipment. that coupled with importing/exporting fruits and vegetables from afar factors into cost also I imagine (I was a mediocre student in Economics 21 years ago so forgive me for my crude theories lol).
Naturebound, I think it depends where you are in Texas :-). I live in West Texas (think: cattle country) and although the variety of fruits and veggies has been more than I would expect, the prices have been sky high. I mentioned the red bell peppers in my other response to this thread, but it's other things too. Even when stuff is in season, it's expensive. Oranges, in season, are $0.68 EACH (that is, each orange, not each pound!) It's crazy. And this isn't one of the more expensive supermarkets, like Market Street or United - it's the Walmart, for heaven's sake! When I was living in San Francisco, could go to a produce stand and get fruits and veggies for very cheap.

Sorry for the whine.

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#26 Old 07-16-2015, 05:01 PM
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Naturebound, I think it depends where you are in Texas :-). I live in West Texas (think: cattle country) and although the variety of fruits and veggies has been more than I would expect, the prices have been sky high. I mentioned the red bell peppers in my other response to this thread, but it's other things too. Even when stuff is in season, it's expensive. Oranges, in season, are $0.68 EACH (that is, each orange, not each pound!) It's crazy. And this isn't one of the more expensive supermarkets, like Market Street or United - it's the Walmart, for heaven's sake! When I was living in San Francisco, could go to a produce stand and get fruits and veggies for very cheap.

Sorry for the whine.

Djuna
I hear ya! The area I was in was Palacios on the Gulf coast. However, I had to travel to the next city to find decent food. Up here in Minnesota, bell peppers are also outrageously expensive. A red bell pepper is about $2. For one. I have tried growing my own but have never had success with growing bell peppers up here. :/ I still buy them but only a few each week and some weeks none.

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