Advice/Tips with transitioning into Vegan for a PICKY eater? - VeggieBoards
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#1 Old 06-27-2015, 04:58 PM
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Question Advice/Tips with transitioning into Vegan for a PICKY eater?

Hello, I am 18 years old, and I need help and advice on transitioning into a Vegan... I want to transition into being a Vegan for health purposes...

Yet, I tend to be a picky eater, and I only find myself drinking green smoothies instead of physically eating the food itself...

I was wondering if anybody can send me some recipes and foods I can eat/cook? Any advice into having a smooth transition into being a Vegan? I want to live a healthy and cruelty free lifestyle. I feel like it's not necessary to eat meat and animal products. I feel like there's so much information out there but nothing well-put together. Especially on the go food will be nice for lunch...

I also tend to binge a lot (on pizza, chicken, salty french fries)
I weight 148 pounds, and I'm 5'2. I'm also going to start exercising to keep myself healthy...

Non-vegan foods make me bloated, sluggish, and depressed.

I would also like some people to comment kindly...I really would like to make a change in my life.
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#2 Old 06-27-2015, 07:40 PM
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Since you like eating the fried, cheesy, salty stuff, why don't you first make a transition to vegetarianism? Many like to jump directly to veganism which is great but it would make things a whole lot difficult for a starter. First directly become a vegetarian, you can still have cheese on your pizza & milk smoothies if you like them. After 3-4 months of disciplining yourself not to have meat & animal products, you can slowly cut out milk and cheese products as well.

Veganism is an all-round lifestyle of not using animal products wherever possible, so if you shun leather, suede, silk, do not use products with animal content or animal testing in them then you'll always be considered a vegan.. I don't think anybody is a perfect vegan yet. Green smoothies are great but once you become a complete vegan you need to dig into a variety of foods for nutrition like nuts for vitamins, calcium & other metals, & boiled veggies for fibre. I'm no recipe expert but you'll hear a lot about rice, lentils, chickpeas, tofu, whole wheat breads, potatoes, kale etc as they'll form the bulk of what an average vegan eats. You'll get a lot of cooking ideas from the other members here. Just plan the transition out carefully so that it can be done easily & with minimum cravings, going veggie first is a good idea.

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#3 Old 06-27-2015, 10:00 PM
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What vegan foods do you already enjoy?

Any fruits or veggies? how about breakfast cereals (quite a few name brands are vegan) and breads? Do you like pasta or rice?

How about calcium rich foods? Do you like fortified orange juice,almond milk or soymilk?

And protein rich foods- do you like peanut butter? baked beans? peas? I see you like chicken, maybe you'd like boca ch'kn patties and nuggets. My 7 year old (who has a very restricted diet due to sensory issues) loves them.

a vegan diet can be as simple as-

cheerios with soymilk and a glass of OJ for breakfast

peanut butter and jelly sandwich for lunch

a banana for snack

spaghetti (no meat) for dinner
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#4 Old 06-27-2015, 10:40 PM
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Hello and welcome! Can you tell us what sort of foods you like to eat? I know you mentioned fries and pizza. You can make your own fries at home by cutting potatoes, sweet potatoes, and even carrots into wedges or strips, coating them in olive oil and salt, and baking them in the oven. Pizza is also easy to veganize: just skip the cheese or add vegan cheese, and top with veggies for a healthier kick. Just make sure to eat enough to keep from binging. You never have to feel hungry or deprived. I like to keep healthy snacks like nuts and fruit in my bag so that I have a quick and easy option when I'm away from home.

Last edited by no whey jose; 06-27-2015 at 10:42 PM.
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#5 Old 06-28-2015, 04:18 AM
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Hi Yanatai and welcome to Veggie Boards! It's great that you want to be healthier!

I have seen a lot of people (even in my own family) go from one extreme to the other...from eating total junk food and never cooking to living on salads and cutting out everything but fruits and vegetables. Usually it results in returning to eating junk and giving up because they feel too deprived and think it is too hard. There is often a misconception that being vegan means eating ONLY fruits and vegetables and that you can't be healthy otherwise. It never has to be all or none and there are so many plant foods that are awesome and satisfying if you give them a chance. Sometimes it is a matter of overcoming myths and biases perpetuated by popular diet gurus and cultures. Whole grains, potatoes, soy products, gluten etc are often labeled as "bad" and "detrimental" to weight loss/health due to their carbs or because they are not as high in protein etc, but this is far from the truth! There are a very small handful of people that have true allergies or intolerances to some of these foods but that does not make them bad for the rest of us. They can be great sources of many nutrients, are lower in fat, and they help with satiety and energy!

A gradual approach to becoming healthier is often the most sustainable way to do it. For example, removing soda pop from your diet and replacing it with those smoothies or plant milks or water will go a long way in helping with weight loss and feeling better. Your body will begin to function better and it encourages more changes.

Convenience is also another issue that seems to come up with so many people. If health is high on your priority list, you can find ways to eat healthy foods without sacrificing a lot of time to prepare them, but it still requires somewhat of a lifestyle change and learning how to cook and prepare healthy food ahead. I have a very busy lifestyle myself, and Sunday is my one day that I have a few extra hours to spend doing some food prep ahead. I plan out a week of meals ahead and on Sundays I spend a few hours cooking dried beans or making homemade bread or cooking whole grains that take longer to cook (like millet, brown or wild rice, quinoa etc). I make big batches and then have them on hand for all week. So when I come home from work during the week I can throw together a thai stir fry over brown rice and it takes all of fifteen minutes to prepare since the rice is cooked ahead. I make five lunches on Sundays and portion them into Tupperware containers for each day. That way, during the week before I leave for the day I just grab one of those containers and off I go. You'd be surprised at how many plant foods keep for an entire week that way.

I like to make energy bars and freeze or refrigerate them to have something to grab and eat when I am hungry. They are far less expensive than some of the designer vegan bars on the market (such as cliff, luna, larabars, etc). I like to follow this recipe formula and mix it up:
http://www.nomeatathlete.com/homemad...gy-bar-recipe/

Sometimes you can cut up some veggies like cauliflower, carrots, celery, snap peas, jicama, broccoli etc and then make or buy some peanut butter or hummus or a bean dip to go with them. This makes a great snack or lunch side dish. Commercial hummus is almost always vegan and easy to find nowadays.

For a quick breakfast that is creamy and high protein and quick to make, I blend a half block of firm tofu or an entire block of small silken tofu with a banana and some pure cocoa powder and maybe a pinch of stevia and salt. It makes a great chocolate pudding that is not too sweet and is very thick and creamy, sort of like a plant based version of Greek yogurt. The tofu provides a great source of calcium and protein as well, and the banana provides an energy source and potassium etc. It's easy to digest first thing in the morning. If you want it sweeter, you can add stuff like maple syrup or agave etc. In place of banana you could try strawberries or another fruit. the vitamin C in strawberries would make the iron in the tofu more absorbable as well.

Some of my favorite vegan sandwiches:

chickpea salad sandwich with vegan mayonnaise (brands like Vegannaise, Just Mayo, Spectrum eggless mayo, Nayonnaise, and Earth Balance Mindful Mayo are just a few brands available out there) and celery, onion, ground black pepper. Canned chickpeas are easy to mash and make a great egg substitute. These sandwiches taste sort of like chicken salad.

Sliced avocado, fresh basil, and sliced tomato sandwich. For a richer sandwich, grill this on the stove with just a touch of oil or Earth Balance vegan butter

homemade or store bought vegan tortilla spread with fat free refried beans (fat free canned refried beans are very cheap and are usually vegan...the full fat varieties often contain lard), lettuce, tomato, and any other veggie you can think of.

Tortilla rolled up with a peanut or nut butter inside...I often make this when out on the trail or canoeing long distances as it provides a source of sustained energy and satiety

Sandwich with strips of red bell pepper, sprouts, and hummus.




Dates all by themselves are like dessert! They have a chewy texture and are sweet and caramel like. Be sure to bring some plant milk to have with them! I have a small container with a tight fitting lid I use to pour some plant milk into and bring along to work. I often have plant milk and dates as a snack at my desk

I like roasted salted pumpkin seeds with shell on and mix them with raisins or chopped dates for a sweet salty snack that also provides a good source of protein, fatty acids, etc

You can make salads more filling and even make them a main course by adding fresh fruits to them, or sprinkle with sesame or sunflower s eeds or walnuts, and add steamed veggies like sliced beets or green beans. I make homemade vegan dressings with tahini or with blended fruit or mustard and vinegar. I also add canned beans like chickpeas or black beans or kidney beans and sometimes use salsa in place of dressing. Salads take very little time to prepare. I make a big salad and portion it into five containers for the week, and add the dressing each day before leaving for work.

Sweet potato takes about two minutes to peel the skin off and about ten minutes to steam in a steamer basket. I like it as is but you can add stuff like coconut milk to it or fresh pineapple with the juice or for something savory add black beans and curry powder. Or as someone else mentioned instead of steaming them cut them into strips and fry or roast or bake them for fries. Sprinkle on some chili powder or salt/pepper.

Toast with beans and salsa or beans and catsup (organic if you can afford it) or a bean spread on top is great for a quick meal too.


When I first went vegan I started with a list of all the foods I was already eating that were naturally vegan and built up a repertoire from there. I read a ton of cookbooks and vegan blogs. Nowadays there are lots of vegan cookbooks in libraries and bookstores. If I didn't want to spend the money to buy one, I would go to some place like Barnes and Noble that had a coffee shop and sit with a cookbook and pick out recipes that looked good/easy and write them out lol. I also printed off recipes from the web with good reviews and made a three ring binder for them (I have six three ring binders full of them now). The more you learn about all the creative ways to prepare plant based food, the more intriguing and easy it becomes to never be bored with vegan food and always have fresh ideas. It is all second nature to me now and I barely have to think of what to eat at all. I have learned so many techniues and ways to cook and prepare foods without eggs and dairy and all that that it boggles my mind that people think they still need eggs for pancakes or breads or omelets lol. I am also very flexible with food as a vegan. Because vegan commercial mayo can be hard to find where I live and is expensive (except Just Mayo), I learned to make my own which is very easy. I also make my own bread and have done it so many times it is second nature and no longer a daunting task. I just work it into my day (usually Sunday). It is so much cheaper to make your own versions of foods than buy commercial foods with tons of additives and sugar etc. It takes time though to build up a vegan kitchen and know what ingredients you need to have on hand. Be patient with yourself and make small changes. In the long run it will be very rewarding!
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#6 Old 06-28-2015, 04:32 AM
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I forgot to add, for a very simple salty and fun vegan snack I air pop some popcorn and spray on Braggs liquid amino acids or soy sauce. Sounds weird but is very tasty!
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#7 Old 06-28-2015, 07:27 AM
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Perseverence! Best advice I have for anyone starting vegan--because it can start off really challenging, but gets easier, and more natural, as time goes on until it's as easy as omnivore meals. Except of course when you unexpectedly need a restaurant, then you learn to compromise.

Every time you see, or think about foods you like examine the components and think of what to switch off. People often ask if I don't get tired of beans, but I find them every bit as varied as meats. They can be cooked to different textures, spices and marinated, And mixed with grains, seeds nuts, veggies to get totally different results
I'll often cook extra beans, grains and freeze. In a real hurry I pour out some grain, add beans or lentil, shake some spice, some Braggs or sriracha, maybe some pinapple chunks if available and top with peanuts or slivered almonds.
Frozen broccoli in particular is good to let defrost a bit and then cooks perfectly in a hot pan. Speaking of pans, I use a cast iron skillet for everything--needs little oil, cleans completely without water, gives a great sear or carmelization, and cooks quickly -- and adds iron to your diet as well.
Lentils-- red or orange cook down and thicken things, much like split peas. Brown or green hold their shape and give texture. I like to use both in most foods, particularly rice and lentils- mudaharra (sp?) in Indian recipes
Better Than Boullion -- jarred soup base pastes in NO chicken, and NO beef as well as vegetable. Really look for the NO because they make real chicken and beef. I get them online at iherb.com. I use for gravies, soups as well as to just stir a bit in hot foods for added flavor. They're concentrated and not as salty as others. You can make a killer French onion soup with the no beef, and the no chicken makes a great gravy. Speaking of gravy, canned Campbells mushroom gravy happens to be vegan, and I like to keep that on hand.
I use a pressure cooker often, makes perfect beans and whole cooked potatoes quickly

You really learn so much about foods. Some chefs say they couldn't be vegan because it would limit them-- I say they don't know enough about cooking to begin with, because veganizing food is a whole artfrom in itself. Look at the new foods from Beyond Meat, Gardien, the fermented vegan artisan cheese (which I sadly haven't yet tried...) and the new Just Mayo vegan mayonaise thats' better all around than any with eggs
If you have a Trader Joes around I have lots of suggestions for their foods. Soy chorizo, tempeh (they have it cheapest) tofu, frozen entrees and veggies and personal products
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#8 Old 06-28-2015, 07:28 AM
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What kinds of stores are around you? Do you have a health food store, Whole Foods type natural foods, Trader Joes, or any ethnic food stores- IndiAn, Asian?
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#9 Old 06-28-2015, 07:47 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by varun View Post
Since you like eating the fried, cheesy, salty stuff, why don't you first make a transition to vegetarianism? Many like to jump directly to veganism which is great but it would make things a whole lot difficult for a starter. First directly become a vegetarian, you can still have cheese on your pizza & milk smoothies if you like them. After 3-4 months of disciplining yourself not to have meat & animal products, you can slowly cut out milk and cheese products as well.

Veganism is an all-round lifestyle of not using animal products wherever possible, so if you shun leather, suede, silk, do not use products with animal content or animal testing in them then you'll always be considered a vegan.. I don't think anybody is a perfect vegan yet. Green smoothies are great but once you become a complete vegan you need to dig into a variety of foods for nutrition like nuts for vitamins, calcium & other metals, & boiled veggies for fibre. I'm no recipe expert but you'll hear a lot about rice, lentils, chickpeas, tofu, whole wheat breads, potatoes, kale etc as they'll form the bulk of what an average vegan eats. You'll get a lot of cooking ideas from the other members here. Just plan the transition out carefully so that it can be done easily & with minimum cravings, going veggie first is a good idea.
Hello friend, that sounds like a good idea to jump into vegetarianism first, but the only reason why I decided to go straight for a vegan lifestyle is because I BARELY eat meat to began with. I feel like I didn't announce that correctly when I say I binge on chicken. My bingeing on chicken only occurs with eating out with family and friends, which is often (It's summer season, so we eat out and cook out a lot), but at home I never eat meat in my meals at ALL (which people call me crazy for??)

I want to get rid of all animal products because those foods make me feel disgusting and sluggish, so I don't think the transition will be crazy hard for me.

I've already been eating organic foods for the past 8 years (I started as a child).

The foods you mentioned are the ones I have no problem eating.
- Kale
- All types of nuts
- Frozen Vegetables (Carrots taste funny to me though lol)
- Brown Rice (WHICH I LOVE!!)
- Wheat bread
- Potatoes (Of course!)

I think I just need to practice for making foods on the go for lunch and for work...that's where I struggle the most... It's the hardest for me since I barely have time.

Thank you so much for replying, I greatly appreciate it.
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#10 Old 06-28-2015, 07:54 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by melimomTARDIS View Post
What vegan foods do you already enjoy?

Any fruits or veggies? how about breakfast cereals (quite a few name brands are vegan) and breads? Do you like pasta or rice?

How about calcium rich foods? Do you like fortified orange juice,almond milk or soymilk?

And protein rich foods- do you like peanut butter? baked beans? peas? I see you like chicken, maybe you'd like boca ch'kn patties and nuggets. My 7 year old (who has a very restricted diet due to sensory issues) loves them.

a vegan diet can be as simple as-

cheerios with soymilk and a glass of OJ for breakfast

peanut butter and jelly sandwich for lunch

a banana for snack

spaghetti (no meat) for dinner
Hello friend, that sounds great! All those things you mention I LOVE to eat!
I love brown rice, and other forms of pasta. I also love Whole Wheat Organic PB & J, and a variety of fruits. I'm just not so great with getting my greens in besides spinach for dinner and kale (and a lot of it) in the morning with my smoothie blend.
I also have this obsession with almonds, I love almonds so much!!

thank you so much for replying!!
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#11 Old 06-28-2015, 08:14 AM
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Originally Posted by no whey jose View Post
Hello and welcome! Can you tell us what sort of foods you like to eat? I know you mentioned fries and pizza. You can make your own fries at home by cutting potatoes, sweet potatoes, and even carrots into wedges or strips, coating them in olive oil and salt, and baking them in the oven. Pizza is also easy to veganize: just skip the cheese or add vegan cheese, and top with veggies for a healthier kick. Just make sure to eat enough to keep from binging. You never have to feel hungry or deprived. I like to keep healthy snacks like nuts and fruit in my bag so that I have a quick and easy option when I'm away from home.
I like kale, spinach, brown rice, wheat bread, all types of nuts, potatoes, some fruits, and I can't think of the rest right now.. but I like a lot.
For snacks I love eating purple/red grapes, and organic air popped sea salt popcorn...very good!!

I just need to expand myself to eating more fruits and vegetables...

thank you so much for giving me a recipe for vegan pizza!! i am going to look more into that
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#12 Old 06-28-2015, 08:20 AM
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Green smoothies are great, but yeah, you do need 'other foods'. I'm glad you see that.

I always reference her, but Ginny Messina has been an invaluable resource for me, especially once I stopped consuming dairy (I stopped consuming animals and eggs a fair while before. Dairy had me worried).

She has a FB page and a website- The Vegan RD.

Have a read of what she's got there. I think it will help. She also has some books. I quite liked "Vegan for Her". But her "Becoming Vegetarian" book is great (she has a "Becoming Vegan" book, but I haven't read it. I'm sure it's quite good though).

Go to meals for lunch- I think we talked about that in another thread on here...... People were sharing bean salad recipes. Bean salads are the easiest things I've ever made!

I mainly eat leftoevers. But, things like hummus, edamame, or even a piece of fruit are all good things to have 'around' on any given day. I find they're good, quick, snacks if I'm just not in the mood to cook or don't have the time. I tend to graze a bit.

Also, looking at what you like to eat....We have a Buddha Bowl thread happening the Food section of the forum, maybe it'll help?

Aside from that, I think some of the most practical advice I got being vegetarian, which has helped me as I've cut eggs and dairy, is to plan. So, while it does take a little extra work, make sure you cook more than you need so you have leftovers to take for lunch. Stirfries don't take that much time to throw together, so I prefer them over everything else.

If you start to get sick of the same old food, seek out new foods.

The less you eat eggs and dairy, the more your tastebuds WILL change.

Where are you in the world? There might be some store bought solutions as well.

For instance, Woolies in Australia now have a whole heap of vegan salads you can just buy, ready made! I adore them! (And they're good salads, not those horrible ones you wouldn't even feed a rabbit :P)
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#13 Old 06-28-2015, 08:27 AM
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Originally Posted by Naturebound View Post
Hi Yanatai and welcome to Veggie Boards! It's great that you want to be healthier!

I have seen a lot of people (even in my own family) go from one extreme to the other...from eating total junk food and never cooking to living on salads and cutting out everything but fruits and vegetables. Usually it results in returning to eating junk and giving up because they feel too deprived and think it is too hard. There is often a misconception that being vegan means eating ONLY fruits and vegetables and that you can't be healthy otherwise. It never has to be all or none and there are so many plant foods that are awesome and satisfying if you give them a chance. Sometimes it is a matter of overcoming myths and biases perpetuated by popular diet gurus and cultures. Whole grains, potatoes, soy products, gluten etc are often labeled as "bad" and "detrimental" to weight loss/health due to their carbs or because they are not as high in protein etc, but this is far from the truth! There are a very small handful of people that have true allergies or intolerances to some of these foods but that does not make them bad for the rest of us. They can be great sources of many nutrients, are lower in fat, and they help with satiety and energy!

A gradual approach to becoming healthier is often the most sustainable way to do it. For example, removing soda pop from your diet and replacing it with those smoothies or plant milks or water will go a long way in helping with weight loss and feeling better. Your body will begin to function better and it encourages more changes.

Convenience is also another issue that seems to come up with so many people. If health is high on your priority list, you can find ways to eat healthy foods without sacrificing a lot of time to prepare them, but it still requires somewhat of a lifestyle change and learning how to cook and prepare healthy food ahead. I have a very busy lifestyle myself, and Sunday is my one day that I have a few extra hours to spend doing some food prep ahead. I plan out a week of meals ahead and on Sundays I spend a few hours cooking dried beans or making homemade bread or cooking whole grains that take longer to cook (like millet, brown or wild rice, quinoa etc). I make big batches and then have them on hand for all week. So when I come home from work during the week I can throw together a thai stir fry over brown rice and it takes all of fifteen minutes to prepare since the rice is cooked ahead. I make five lunches on Sundays and portion them into Tupperware containers for each day. That way, during the week before I leave for the day I just grab one of those containers and off I go. You'd be surprised at how many plant foods keep for an entire week that way.

I like to make energy bars and freeze or refrigerate them to have something to grab and eat when I am hungry. They are far less expensive than some of the designer vegan bars on the market (such as cliff, luna, larabars, etc). I like to follow this recipe formula and mix it up:
http://www.nomeatathlete.com/homemad...gy-bar-recipe/

Sometimes you can cut up some veggies like cauliflower, carrots, celery, snap peas, jicama, broccoli etc and then make or buy some peanut butter or hummus or a bean dip to go with them. This makes a great snack or lunch side dish. Commercial hummus is almost always vegan and easy to find nowadays.

For a quick breakfast that is creamy and high protein and quick to make, I blend a half block of firm tofu or an entire block of small silken tofu with a banana and some pure cocoa powder and maybe a pinch of stevia and salt. It makes a great chocolate pudding that is not too sweet and is very thick and creamy, sort of like a plant based version of Greek yogurt. The tofu provides a great source of calcium and protein as well, and the banana provides an energy source and potassium etc. It's easy to digest first thing in the morning. If you want it sweeter, you can add stuff like maple syrup or agave etc. In place of banana you could try strawberries or another fruit. the vitamin C in strawberries would make the iron in the tofu more absorbable as well.

Some of my favorite vegan sandwiches:

chickpea salad sandwich with vegan mayonnaise (brands like Vegannaise, Just Mayo, Spectrum eggless mayo, Nayonnaise, and Earth Balance Mindful Mayo are just a few brands available out there) and celery, onion, ground black pepper. Canned chickpeas are easy to mash and make a great egg substitute. These sandwiches taste sort of like chicken salad.

Sliced avocado, fresh basil, and sliced tomato sandwich. For a richer sandwich, grill this on the stove with just a touch of oil or Earth Balance vegan butter

homemade or store bought vegan tortilla spread with fat free refried beans (fat free canned refried beans are very cheap and are usually vegan...the full fat varieties often contain lard), lettuce, tomato, and any other veggie you can think of.

Tortilla rolled up with a peanut or nut butter inside...I often make this when out on the trail or canoeing long distances as it provides a source of sustained energy and satiety

Sandwich with strips of red bell pepper, sprouts, and hummus.




Dates all by themselves are like dessert! They have a chewy texture and are sweet and caramel like. Be sure to bring some plant milk to have with them! I have a small container with a tight fitting lid I use to pour some plant milk into and bring along to work. I often have plant milk and dates as a snack at my desk

I like roasted salted pumpkin seeds with shell on and mix them with raisins or chopped dates for a sweet salty snack that also provides a good source of protein, fatty acids, etc

You can make salads more filling and even make them a main course by adding fresh fruits to them, or sprinkle with sesame or sunflower s eeds or walnuts, and add steamed veggies like sliced beets or green beans. I make homemade vegan dressings with tahini or with blended fruit or mustard and vinegar. I also add canned beans like chickpeas or black beans or kidney beans and sometimes use salsa in place of dressing. Salads take very little time to prepare. I make a big salad and portion it into five containers for the week, and add the dressing each day before leaving for work.

Sweet potato takes about two minutes to peel the skin off and about ten minutes to steam in a steamer basket. I like it as is but you can add stuff like coconut milk to it or fresh pineapple with the juice or for something savory add black beans and curry powder. Or as someone else mentioned instead of steaming them cut them into strips and fry or roast or bake them for fries. Sprinkle on some chili powder or salt/pepper.

Toast with beans and salsa or beans and catsup (organic if you can afford it) or a bean spread on top is great for a quick meal too.


When I first went vegan I started with a list of all the foods I was already eating that were naturally vegan and built up a repertoire from there. I read a ton of cookbooks and vegan blogs. Nowadays there are lots of vegan cookbooks in libraries and bookstores. If I didn't want to spend the money to buy one, I would go to some place like Barnes and Noble that had a coffee shop and sit with a cookbook and pick out recipes that looked good/easy and write them out lol. I also printed off recipes from the web with good reviews and made a three ring binder for them (I have six three ring binders full of them now). The more you learn about all the creative ways to prepare plant based food, the more intriguing and easy it becomes to never be bored with vegan food and always have fresh ideas. It is all second nature to me now and I barely have to think of what to eat at all. I have learned so many techniues and ways to cook and prepare foods without eggs and dairy and all that that it boggles my mind that people think they still need eggs for pancakes or breads or omelets lol. I am also very flexible with food as a vegan. Because vegan commercial mayo can be hard to find where I live and is expensive (except Just Mayo), I learned to make my own which is very easy. I also make my own bread and have done it so many times it is second nature and no longer a daunting task. I just work it into my day (usually Sunday). It is so much cheaper to make your own versions of foods than buy commercial foods with tons of additives and sugar etc. It takes time though to build up a vegan kitchen and know what ingredients you need to have on hand. Be patient with yourself and make small changes. In the long run it will be very rewarding!

Thank you Thank you Thank you so much my friend!!! Everything you mentioned I am comfortable with doing, and I do much of those things anyways. I don't drink soda at ALL (it causes me to have gas build up, and causes me to have severe back pain.) I create infusion drinks with cucumbers, lemons, strawberries, and berries. I love love love drinking water, never soda. Sometimes I go for a snapple, but that causes me to bloat just a bit, so I drink it as a one time thing...

I am going to try and create meals throughout the week so I won't go starving within the day/week, which causes me to go out and eat... but I am going to behave myself.

Thank you so much, i'll keep your tips and advice for meals and etc in mind!!
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#14 Old 06-28-2015, 08:33 AM
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I forgot to add, for a very simple salty and fun vegan snack I air pop some popcorn and spray on Braggs liquid amino acids or soy sauce. Sounds weird but is very tasty!
I LOVE air popped popcorn!! I love the company Braggs, but I don't like amino acids...or soy sauce (unless it's in my rice, and it's watered down/very low sodium).
I just eat air popped popcorn with sea salt, and that's about it.

It's my go-to snack
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#15 Old 06-28-2015, 08:42 AM
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What kinds of stores are around you? Do you have a health food store, Whole Foods type natural foods, Trader Joes, or any ethnic food stores- IndiAn, Asian?
Hello friend, I live around FairWay, Whole Foods, Stop & Shop, and I do live by a Trader Joes, but it's alittle further away.

I read your previous reply and I thank you for giving me tips and advice on foods to eat, and what to get to eat. I love beans a lot though, especially light brown kidney beans!! so good!!! ughhh. I usually eat the whole can because I can't get enough...LOL

thank you so much!!!
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#16 Old 06-28-2015, 09:04 AM
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Green smoothies are great, but yeah, you do need 'other foods'. I'm glad you see that.

I always reference her, but Ginny Messina has been an invaluable resource for me, especially once I stopped consuming dairy (I stopped consuming animals and eggs a fair while before. Dairy had me worried).

She has a FB page and a website- The Vegan RD.

Have a read of what she's got there. I think it will help. She also has some books. I quite liked "Vegan for Her". But her "Becoming Vegetarian" book is great (she has a "Becoming Vegan" book, but I haven't read it. I'm sure it's quite good though).

Go to meals for lunch- I think we talked about that in another thread on here...... People were sharing bean salad recipes. Bean salads are the easiest things I've ever made!

I mainly eat leftoevers. But, things like hummus, edamame, or even a piece of fruit are all good things to have 'around' on any given day. I find they're good, quick, snacks if I'm just not in the mood to cook or don't have the time. I tend to graze a bit.

Also, looking at what you like to eat....We have a Buddha Bowl thread happening the Food section of the forum, maybe it'll help?

Aside from that, I think some of the most practical advice I got being vegetarian, which has helped me as I've cut eggs and dairy, is to plan. So, while it does take a little extra work, make sure you cook more than you need so you have leftovers to take for lunch. Stirfries don't take that much time to throw together, so I prefer them over everything else.

If you start to get sick of the same old food, seek out new foods.

The less you eat eggs and dairy, the more your tastebuds WILL change.

Where are you in the world? There might be some store bought solutions as well.

For instance, Woolies in Australia now have a whole heap of vegan salads you can just buy, ready made! I adore them! (And they're good salads, not those horrible ones you wouldn't even feed a rabbit :P)
Hello friend, I remember the time as a child, I transitioned from eating junk in the household to eating organic at the age of 10. My tastebuds changed GREATLY, but I also ate less because I was picky. I actually don't eat eggs a lot in my household or dairy in my household. The only time I eat eggs is when I eat bacon and egg sandwich in the mornings while outside..but I didn't start that habit until I became a senior in highschool...It was the only food available in the morning lol.

I will look into everything you just mentioned..thank you so much!! I will look deeper into the forums and participate in asking questions.
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#17 Old 06-28-2015, 09:06 AM
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What's your comfort level with cooking? I get off work at 2 or 3 so am home to cook dinner except the 2 nights I got to school (then my husband cooks), we make extra to take to work/school the next day. I will find any recipe that looks good, with or without animal products, and make adaptations as necessary but my husband prefers to find a recipe that's already vegan. He's been getting more adventurous lately, though, because if we're both home I'll explain what the recipe calls for and how I'm changing it so he's starting to learn how to switch things up.

Last night we had green rice casserole. Unfortunately I can't find the recipe at the moment but it was 3 cups of cooked rice mixed with sauted onion and creamed spinach (sauted spinach mixed with flour, as a thickener, and almond milk). The whole thing was baked for about 30 minutes.

Tonight will be pulled "pork" sandwiches with this recipe http://blissfulbasil.com/2013/07/30/bbq-pulled-pork/ Jackfruit can be found at an Asian super market, if you have any near you. And we'll have baked beans on the side. Bush's has vegetarian baked beans, and their brown sugar hickory flavor is also vegetarian.

Tomorrow my husband will make omelets for dinner (we like breakfast for dinner sometimes). Vegan omelets can be made with chickpea flour (which can also be found an an Asian or Indian market). Here is a recipe http://www.forkandbeans.com/2015/01/...ickpea-omelet/ but many more are available online if this one doesn't work out well.

Tuesday we will be having chili dogs. Lightlife (refrigerator section) and Morning Star (freezer section) both make veggie dogs. If you already have a chili recipe you can make it with an extra can of beans to replace the meat, if not you can buy Amy's vegetarian chili in the store. To make from scratch use one or two cans of chili beans, a can of tomato sauce, a can of dice tomatoes (and I like to add half an onion and a diced green pepper), then add chili powder, salt and pepper.

Wednesday the hubby is meeting a friend for dinner while I'm at school, so I'll heat up leftovers when I get home.

Thursday is broccoli casserole. I'm using a chicken casserole recipe, found here http://www.cooks.com/recipe/ns3up8w9/chicken-morni.html I will omit the chicken, use an avocado mixed with olive oil and a little lemon juice and salt to make a "mayo". I'll make a cream of celery soup instead of the cream of chicken. To make my own I will saute celery in oil, add a little flour and almond milk (with a veggie broth bouillon cube). I'll use almond milk instead of the can of evaporated milk and nutritional yeast instead of the cheese.

Friday we are having potato salad (again, you can find a traditional recipe and use avocado to make the mayo). I know you can also make a mayo with cashews... but I don't know how to do that. We will also be having eggplant pomodoro (which, for me means eggplant slices coated in avocado mayo, then breaded and baked, topped with diced tomatoes).

Hope this helps get you started!
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#18 Old 06-28-2015, 04:53 PM
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you'll do fine OP, you already eat quite a variety. Now the real question is, do you like oreos?
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#19 Old 06-28-2015, 05:54 PM
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It sounds like you already have a huge repertoire of vegan foods you enjoy so I am confused about where you are picky and what the concern is. Are you worried you might miss some nutrient? or maybe you just need new recipe ideas? Is eating out a problem as far as the vegan lifestyle for you? From what you have subsequently shared it sounds like you are well on your way already!
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