IBS? - VeggieBoards
Forum Jump: 
 
Thread Tools
#1 Old 03-02-2014, 02:35 AM
 
DaisyKat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Posts: 28
Does anyone else have IBS? Mine started towards the end of my marriage. The doctor said it was caused by anxiety. I definitely had a lot of that not only due to my failing marriage, but also going to grad school at the same time. Anyways, I was put on a very mild antidepressant which has greatly reduced symptoms and even reduced number of occurrences of IBS attacks. Tonight, however, has been a doozy!!! So far, I have had 6 episodes, the first three of WFL which I passed out. This has happened before so it isn't anything extraordinary and the severity has been decreasing. I am just in pain now. Anyways, I was just wondering if any of you all have this. I would like to get off the meds someday, but would not have liked to go through this night if it was worse due to not taking them. What are your strategies for decreasing intensity and severity of episodes? Or even preventing them all together?
DaisyKat is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
#2 Old 03-02-2014, 04:16 AM
Banned
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Posts: 49

Do you eat a lot of grains? (Wheat, rice, oats, rye, etc) these will mess up your stomach as they're not a natural part of a human diet. Drinking a generous amount of water will help too. Eating mostly fruits, some vegetables, and small amounts of everything else would be your best bet. Whats happening to you isn't natural, its caused by something.

Tatsuhiro Satou is offline  
#3 Old 03-02-2014, 05:13 AM
Veggie Regular
 
Naturebound's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: Minnesota
Posts: 4,609

I was labeled with IBS for many years, but I knew I had something else.  I had fevers and severe pain that would wake me at night.  I had every test there is, from sigmoidoscopies/colonoscopies, to barium enema, to upper endoscopies, to blood tests and xrays and ultrasounds.  All normal.  Then I started having symptoms around ovulation and my period and finally after five years of hell (including passing out at work and being brought to the ER hyperventilating and having a morphine injection to bear the pain) a gynecologist did a laparoscopy and looked inside my abdomen and found extensive endometriosis on my bladder, bowels, outside of uterus and ovaries.  Endometriosis responds to the rise and fall of hormones and also to foods that aggravate it (such as dairy and heavy meats laced with hormones).  It can also cause digestive distress.  Unfortunately most doctors' answer to treating it are drugs, more hormones, or removing all your reproductive organs.  So at 33 years of age I lost all my reproductive organs, which only caused a whole new set of problems.  Only after I got dairy out of my diet and went fully vegan and eat a mostly whole foods plant based diet (and increasingly raw) did the digestive problems and terrible pain subside.  Those years long ago when I was labeled with IBS I was also on several antidepressants.  Getting off of them improved my ability to poop tremendously.  The constipation they caused made the pain ten times worse because that hard stool pressed on my bowels.  My body is VERY sensitive to drugs, vitamin supplements etc so I keep that stuff out of my body or to a minimum (due to the severe osteoporosis I now have I do have to take some D and calcium supplements etc).  Anti depressants may help you relax so in that regard might help move things along, but they can also backfire and mess with your digestion too.  They are known to target certain nerves that are related to digestion.  

 

I sometimes think IBS is a blanket diagnosis when they can't find anything else, but I am not a medical professional and I could be wrong.  That's just my theory.  after all, it is diagnosed by ruling everything else out.  But did they REALLY check for everything?  I wonder had I been diagnosed with the endometriosis way earlier on if it would not have gotten so severe.  No doctor would even try to just remove the endo lesions because there were too many.  My insurance wouldn't allow me to see a specialist.  I wish though that doctors would focus on gynecological issues when IBS is suspected, because they do go hand in hand.  I also had very normal periods, just painful, and always thought the pain was a normal part of a menstrual period.  So I had no reason to suspect it was related.  

 

Another area to check into are food allergies and intolerances if you haven't already.  I can not tolerate tofu.  I can tolerate all other soy products, but tofu causes terrible cramps and diarrhea almost immediately.  it was trial and error to figure this out.  Same with cashews.  I can not tolerate them, but use almonds in place and am fine.  I never ate tofu before becoming vegan so I would not have known I have trouble digesting it.  Even if it is hidden in vegan mayo or whatever.  Do you keep a diary of what you eat and how you feel after?  It might help.  

ilikekale likes this.

In the end, only kindness matters. - Jewel



To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Naturebound is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
#4 Old 03-02-2014, 06:31 AM
Bracing for snow
 
ilikekale's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Ohio
Posts: 489
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tatsuhiro Satou View Post

Do you eat a lot of grains? (Wheat, rice, oats, rye, etc) these will mess up your stomach as they're not a natural part of a human diet.

This is just wrong. It's a popular theme today, but it's wrong. People have been growing and eating grains for 10,000 years without these problems. We were eating their wild versions a heck of a lot longer ago than that (why do you think people started "growing" them in the first place?)

Now I'm not as big a fan of the current engineered versions as I am of the old varieties but to say they are unnatural is a myth.

I also think that once you get a serious reaction to something (like undigested protien from wheat) you should lay off it until your gut heals and your immune system stops thinking of it as a foreign invader.

To the IBS, yes, it probably is a catchall and over diagnosed but have you had your intestinal flora (gut bacteria) levels checked? You might want to try a quality probiotic for a while (or increase probiotic foods like "live" fermented veggies.) and see if that help.

Following up on other avenues (like the endometriosis - good call on that one by the way!) is probably smart too...

Getting to the bottom of this stuff is not easy.

Ken
ilikekale is offline  
#5 Old 03-02-2014, 07:08 AM
 
DaisyKat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Posts: 28
I did eat more grains yesterday than I have in a while. I will cut back again. I have also just been under a lot of stress lately. What has happened before is after things start coming together again I get this. It's kind of like when you hold your shoulders tense and then get a headache after you relax from the increased blood flow. I do realize that it is not good and I hope it never happens again. It was horrible. Thanks for your thoughts though. I am starting to feel better; just tired and sore.
DaisyKat is offline  
#6 Old 03-02-2014, 07:19 AM
 
DaisyKat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Posts: 28
Naturebound, I am sorry you had to go through all of that. This is the first time this has happened in the past 4 years since my divorce was final. I remember the first time I had it before my diagnosis, I was miserable for months. Just a few days after taking the Celexa I was feeling better. I have never noticed a correlation with food, but I will start to write what I am eating for that purpose. My cramps are very connected with stress too. Months that are less stressful just go very smoothly with very little pain; those months with more stress not so much. Thank you for all of your thought and suggestions.
DaisyKat is offline  
#7 Old 03-02-2014, 07:26 AM
 
DaisyKat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Posts: 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ilikekale View Post

This is just wrong. It's a popular theme today, but it's wrong. People have been growing and eating grains for 10,000 years without these problems. We were eating their wild versions a heck of a lot longer ago than that (why do you think people started "growing" them in the first place?)

Getting to the bottom of this stuff i

Ken



I am glad I don't have to give up oatmeal. I had a bowl yesterday morning and it was very good. smiley.gif

I forgot to say also that I have given up dairy and eggs too. Most of the time my stomach has been so happy it practically sings.

Since this is mostly triggered by stress, I do want to try fix it mostly with appropriate diet and exercise. I can't, of course, eliminate stress as easily I as I eliminated the meat, dairy, and eggs. Wouldn't it be nice if we could though? smiley.gif
DaisyKat is offline  
#8 Old 03-02-2014, 07:41 AM
Bracing for snow
 
ilikekale's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Ohio
Posts: 489
Have you tried meditation? It's not a quick fix but it might help.

Ken
ilikekale is offline  
#9 Old 03-02-2014, 07:43 AM
Veggie Regular
 
Naturebound's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: Minnesota
Posts: 4,609
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaisyKat View Post


I am glad I don't have to give up oatmeal. I had a bowl yesterday morning and it was very good. smiley.gif

I forgot to say also that I have given up dairy and eggs too. Most of the time my stomach has been so happy it practically sings.

Since this is mostly triggered by stress, I do want to try fix it mostly with appropriate diet and exercise. I can't, of course, eliminate stress as easily I as I eliminated the meat, dairy, and eggs. Wouldn't it be nice if we could though? smiley.gif

Exercise is a wonderful stress reliever, for sure!  I forgot about that.  Yoga really helps open your body up and release tension.  Cardio gets the endorphins going and just makes you feel good all around, and resistance and weight lifting can help with metabolism and build strength and confidence.  It also helps get out some frustration too.  :)  I am a serious worrier and suffer with anxiety and a bit of OCD, so I can relate to how that affects your body.  For me it's lack of sleep which just compounds everything else.  I tend to overdo it with exercise lol.  When I start straining myself, I know to slow down and start doing more yoga and so on and try to take a day off here and there.  I love to move and exercise really does help my anxiety if I don't overdo it.  When it's warmer, I ride my bike and hike and run trails more and the fresh air before work makes all the difference!

 

  If the meds help you, I am not going to judge you there.  Sounds like you are doing everything you can to help yourself, and you are eating healthy.  I wouldn't worry about the grains either!  I think whole grains can provide benefits and satiety and I agree that they are not the evil food a lot of people make them out to be.  It's just all the processing, sugar, and other crap added to them that give them a bad rep.  


In the end, only kindness matters. - Jewel



To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Naturebound is offline  
#10 Old 03-02-2014, 08:47 AM
 
Jordy Verrill's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: Cincinnati, Ohio
Posts: 88

I have an undiagnosed inflammatory bowel condition/IBS that flares up from time to time, although it's not related to stress.  Before I went vegan (or plant based, as I switched to a whole food plant based diet for my health, and my GI issues, well before I went vegan for ethical reasons) I was in misery with stomach cramping, nausea, and a general sense of not being well.  After switching to the WFPB diet my symptoms went away for the most part, other than the occasional, not as severe flare ups.  When my symptoms do flare up, it's usually because I've strayed from my WFPB diet, which includes plenty of grains, specifically rice, which despite what the latest dietary junk science trends say, is perfectly healthy to eat.  If rice cause health problems, Asians would be the most unhealthy people in the world.  But in reality, Asians eating a traditional Asian diet of rice and vegetables and very limited amounts of animal products are pretty much the healthiest people in the world.  Anyway... when I stray from my WFPB and eat fatty foods or too much vegan junk food, it's like clock work with my flare ups.  So I suppose my suggestion would be to stick to a fairly bland diet of steamed veggies and some kind of starch, either rice, oats, potatoes, or something along those lines and see if you get any relief. 

Jordy Verrill is offline  
#11 Old 03-02-2014, 09:56 AM
 
DaisyKat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Posts: 28
Ken, I have been meditating first thing in the morning. I used to wake up and go straight to email. The meditation has been much better.
DaisyKat is offline  
#12 Old 03-02-2014, 10:08 AM
Bracing for snow
 
ilikekale's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Ohio
Posts: 489
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaisyKat View Post

Ken, I have been meditating first thing in the morning. I used to wake up and go straight to email. The meditation has been much better.

Exact same change I made. Really makes the whole day go better.

Ken
ilikekale is offline  
#13 Old 03-02-2014, 10:29 AM
 
pandiculationco's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 998

Ken already said almost everything I would have.  Great advice.

 

Grains are the seeds of plant, containing all of the essential nutrients for a living thing to grow- they're possibly the best thing for human nutrition there is, and human society has been built on them: easy to cultivate, store for long period, transport, and rich in complex carbs, proteins, vitamins and minerals.

 

The only drawback to grains is anti-nutritional content, like phytic acid, which is their defense mechanism.  

 

But if we look at traditional preparation of grains, those almost always include extensive soaking and fermenting- which both reduce phytic acid.

Soaking all the way to sprouting and then long fermenting with sourdough culture is a great way to reduce that, and together produces perhaps the cheapest and healthiest food product you can find.

 

The only whole grain I don't widely recommend is brown rice (although I eat a lot of it myself) because it's a bit high in starches (particularly if somebody is trying to lose weight).  All other grains, particularly more "wild" varieties like black rice, and wild rice, contain a richer source of plant protein and other good stuff.

 

Oats are one of the cheapest and most healthy grains you can buy. :)  They're also rich in soluble fiber (which could be important)

 

 

Some people with IBS have trouble with gluten and gluten containing grains, so you might want to keep an eye out on that just to see if it bothers you (it might now bother you at all).

 

Other people report problems with insoluble fiber (although this may be an issue of flora or infrequency of consumption rather than the fiber itself), so you could look at increasing soluble fiber (and decreasing insoluble fiber).

 

It would be worth keeping a food journal, just in case you have any food triggers.  I know tomatoes can be rough on some people with IBS.  It depends on the person.

 

A food journal will help you identify if there are any triggers.

 

Some people also feel they benefit from an elimination diet, but that's quite an undertaking and usually only for people with really severe problems.

 

If you think yours is triggered by stress, maybe that's all of the problem.

 

As Ken suggested, meditation might be of help.

ilikekale likes this.
pandiculationco is offline  
#14 Old 03-02-2014, 11:14 AM
Oryzatarian
 
Auxin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: USDA z7a
Posts: 1,359

I'd also say scrutinize diet. Dont just track it but actively test it.

An 'elimination diet' isnt some radical extreme applicable to only the dieing.

 

I went through hell with gut pain from when I was an infant until I was 18. I had the misfortune of having excellent health insurance, in all I had 20 doctors who tested and treated me by 18- most of them specialists. Of them all not one ever scrutinized my diet. Only one mentioned diet, and his only question was a vague "do you eat ok food?" Doctors just simply put me on every prescription medication available, one by one, and gave me every test available. I even had one specialist take one look at my insurance and suggest we could "try" removing part of my intestines to see if it helps, he admitted he had no idea what might be causing the pain.

In the end I ignored my parents, fired my doctors, and set about curing myself.

 

I was raised on junk food and candy and I have food intolerances to chocolate, processed meat, and eggs, so I was always in pain because a week had never passed without one of those. Thats it. 100% cured now. And I didnt even have to cut out my own intestines, lol. Dietary testing also let me discover other fun stuff like eating nuts causes arthritic problems in me but without nuts theres no joint pain and I can even run for miles, no troubles.

 

Even if stress sets off an episode you might still have a dietary foundation at the basis of the situation, and dietary testing might uncover unexpected things, or simply give you a sort of freedom knowing you really can change around diet fundamentals and survive. Just knowing your stronger than your habits can be a surprisingly enabling reward by itself.

Auxin is offline  
#15 Old 03-02-2014, 12:58 PM
 
pandiculationco's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 998
Quote:
Originally Posted by Auxin View Post

 

Even if stress sets off an episode you might still have a dietary foundation at the basis of the situation, and dietary testing might uncover unexpected things, or simply give you a sort of freedom knowing you really can change around diet fundamentals and survive. Just knowing your stronger than your habits can be a surprisingly enabling reward by itself.

 

Also, it could be that she eats different food when stressed (a lot of us do), or varies amounts, ratios, or eats something by itself more often.

 

Sometimes stress has physical side effects in the behavior it creates, and that could confuse the situation.

 

 

If you're up for it, an elimination diet and experimentation could probably only help.  But it is a lot of work- you have to be ready to really commit to it.

pandiculationco is offline  
#16 Old 03-02-2014, 01:49 PM
 
DaisyKat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Posts: 28
Before I became vegan, I would absolutely change my eating while under stress. I have not been doing that lately. It has only been since February 14th however, that I went from vegetarian to vegan. Probably just takes some time to get the full benefits. I will start journaling to see if that reveals anything. If it happens again, I will try the elimination diet.
DaisyKat is offline  
#17 Old 03-03-2014, 08:25 PM
Not a Beginner
 
weaselbritches's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Perth, Australia
Posts: 53
My Dr admitted/blatantly stated that once they've done the celiac test, if it's not celiacs then it's IBS. Even after I told him I was pretty sure it was food related. I was suffering major bloating, sinus problems and nausea. I went to another GP (in the same practice o_0 ) who referred me to a dietician. We did the full Royal Prince Alfred Hospital elimination diet for chemical sensitivities, seeing as I'm very fragrance sensitive and can also only use certain face washes and shampoos without my skin over reacting. Unfortunately, while I think the chemical sensitivities are an issue, I don't think I spent enough time off dairy before doing the diet for the detox not to skew the results. Dairy seems to be the major contributor and I've barely bloated since cutting it out. After the diet I went back to lacto-ovo vegetarian for a while and when I ceased dairy again, I suffered sinus headaches for a good 6 weeks afterwards, hence the concern about the elimination results.

As of recently I've been over reacting to alcohol too (well, I think it's alcohol). I used to be able to drink way too much and barely suffer at all, but lately I'll drink a moderate amount (3- 4 drinks) and get a sinus style headache for most of the next day and slight nausea until almost 24 hours after the booze and then start throwing up. The throwing up is short lived but I then still feel horrible for days. My workmate thinks I may be getting alcohol induced migraines. Anyone else experienced anything similar? The delayed reaction makes it seem like it's more allergy related than anything else.
weaselbritches is offline  
#18 Old 03-03-2014, 08:35 PM
Banned
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Posts: 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ilikekale View Post


This is just wrong. It's a popular theme today, but it's wrong. People have been growing and eating grains for 10,000 years without these problems. We were eating their wild versions a heck of a lot longer ago than that (why do you think people started "growing" them in the first place?)

Now I'm not as big a fan of the current engineered versions as I am of the old varieties but to say they are unnatural is a myth.

I also think that once you get a serious reaction to something (like undigested protien from wheat) you should lay off it until your gut heals and your immune system stops thinking of it as a foreign invader.

To the IBS, yes, it probably is a catchall and over diagnosed but have you had your intestinal flora (gut bacteria) levels checked? You might want to try a quality probiotic for a while (or increase probiotic foods like "live" fermented veggies.) and see if that help.

Following up on other avenues (like the endometriosis - good call on that one by the way!) is probably smart too...

Getting to the bottom of this stuff is not easy.

Ken

Eh, I disagree but ok. Unless you have a legitimate source then I may open my mind up to it. My main concern with grains is the high content of phytic acid stripping nutrients from me, though I will say I'm not fully educated about the phytase that counter-act it, and how much there is. I also get diarrhea for 1-3 days if I eat too much of it. I also heard that grains introduced many new diseases to humans that we weren't capable of getting before we starting eating grains. A lot of people say they feel way better after they go grain-free, so I don't know. But if you're right about it not causing any problems, I'd like to know where to get these "old varieties".

Tatsuhiro Satou is offline  
#19 Old 03-03-2014, 09:04 PM
 
DaisyKat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Posts: 28
I have been thinking that I may have some food allergies after all. A couple of years ago I had the scratch tests for allergies. I tested positive for over 85% of what was tested..animal, trees, other plants, etc. The doctor said that I would be better off if I lived in a bubble or just quit breathing. I told the doctor that I had tried to quit breathing once, but the withdrawal symptoms were simply too difficult. wink3.gif After that I have become more sensitive to certain scented lotions, dish washing liquuuids, etc. I get a rash and have even started carrying Benadryl cream in my purse just in case. I am going to start writing that journal with how I feel. I am also going to use the pulse method to determine how my body is reacting to certain foods. I learned about that when living with my ex boyfriend. He had used the elimination diet with his daughter. She is gluten intolerant. What you do is take your pulse. Then you eat the food that you are concerned about and wait 30 minutes. If after 39 minutes your pulse has increased by 10 or more, you probably have an allergy related to that food. Just thought I would share in case this could be useful to any of you.
DaisyKat is offline  
#20 Old 03-04-2014, 06:36 AM
Bracing for snow
 
ilikekale's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Ohio
Posts: 489
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tatsuhiro Satou View Post

Eh, I disagree but ok. Unless you have a legitimate source then I may open my mind up to it. My main concern with grains is the high content of phytic acid stripping nutrients from me, though I will say I'm not fully educated about the phytase that counter-act it, and how much there is. I also get diarrhea for 1-3 days if I eat too much of it. I also heard that grains introduced many new diseases to humans that we weren't capable of getting before we starting eating grains. A lot of people say they feel way better after they go grain-free, so I don't know. But if you're right about it not causing any problems, I'd like to know where to get these "old varieties".

It's a running dialog and gets confusing for those of us not actually involved with research. For every study showing A you can always find one showing Not A.

As to phytates, soaking, sprouting and cooking all reduce the quantity. Doing all three, as I tend to do, pretty much negates any effects. Same is true for beans.

As to older varieties (I use Einkorn a lot) our grocery stocks them. You can also order most anything these days.

Ken
ilikekale is offline  
#21 Old 03-04-2014, 09:39 AM
 
pandiculationco's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 998
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ilikekale View Post

It's a running dialog and gets confusing for those of us not actually involved with research. For every study showing A you can always find one showing Not A.

 

Well, yes, but I think the important point is the null hypothesis.  When we see claims like these:

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tatsuhiro Satou View Post
 

I also heard that grains introduced many new diseases to humans that we weren't capable of getting before we starting eating grains. A lot of people say they feel way better after they go grain-free, so I don't know.

 

Which come from anecdotal reports, and internet/TV personalities selling books and diet plans and stirring a big pot of woo, without any actual controls, the rational default position is to reject them unless they provide compelling evidence to back them up.

 

 

Phytates are the only known issues,  and solutions to these problems existed before recorded history.  Traditional methods of preparation of most grains involves extensive soaking, sometimes sprouting, often fermentation, and cooking.

 

Some people are gluten intolerant, but that's another issue entirely, and only recommends avoiding gluten grains (which are the minority of grains- although those often used, like wheat).
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ilikekale View Post

As to phytates, soaking, sprouting and cooking all reduce the quantity. Doing all three, as I tend to do, pretty much negates any effects. Same is true for beans.


You forgot fermentation ^_^

 

I'd say even just picking one or two of the above is probably plenty.  Just one and you start to get into heavy phytate territory.  The studies I've seen show diminishing returns from additional processes.  Where the first thing you do gets rid of most of it, the second almost eliminates it, and it's all less and less effect from there because there's not much left to do.

 

That said, modern bread leavening doesn't count, because they just dump a bunch of inactive yeast in and let it rise for a couple hours.

 

I usually do a long (like overnight, or half the day) sourdough fermentation when I'm making bread.

ilikekale likes this.
pandiculationco is offline  
#22 Old 03-04-2014, 09:53 AM
Bracing for snow
 
ilikekale's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Ohio
Posts: 489
Quote:
Originally Posted by pandiculationco View Post

You forgot fermentation ^_^

I did, appreciate the catch. Yesterday was a tough day wink3.gif
Quote:
Originally Posted by pandiculationco View Post

I usually do a long (like overnight, or half the day) sourdough fermentation when I'm making bread.

Exactly as I do. I soak the grain for 12 hours, sprout them for 2 days then sourdough ferment overnight, then bake. If phytates can survive all that, they deserve to wink3.gif

Ken
ilikekale is offline  
#23 Old 03-04-2014, 04:07 PM
 
pandiculationco's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 998
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ilikekale View Post


Exactly as I do. I soak the grain for 12 hours, sprout them for 2 days then sourdough ferment overnight, then bake. If phytates can survive all that, they deserve to wink3.gif
 

 

Nice!

 

That would be my ideal, if I were more organized.  Usually I just buy flour, though, so unfortunately sprouting is probably out of the question at that point.

 

I'll try to get more into sprouting once summer rolls around.  I envy your conviction!

pandiculationco is offline  
#24 Old 03-04-2014, 04:28 PM
Bracing for snow
 
ilikekale's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Ohio
Posts: 489
Quote:
Originally Posted by pandiculationco View Post

That would be my ideal, if I were more organized.  Usually I just buy flour, though, so unfortunately sprouting is probably out of the question at that point.

Yeah, you're probably right wink3.gif
Quote:
Originally Posted by pandiculationco View Post

I'll try to get more into sprouting once summer rolls around.  I envy your conviction!

It's really pretty easy. You can sprout the wheat in just about anything. It's not like you're going for salad sprouts or anything. You just need that first little "tail" to poke out wink3.gif My biggest thing is the planning/scheduling. Using flour I could wait until I needed bread the next day. Now I need a 2 1/2 day lead time. Sometimes our bread eating us predictable but occasionally I've gotten caught short. Still trying to figure out how to rush sprouting wink3.gif

Ken
ilikekale is offline  
#25 Old 01-18-2017, 08:33 AM
Newbie
 
rose10's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2017
Location: Auckland
Posts: 45
I got it 2 years ago. It's also caused by anxiety. My condition became more severe due to that I consumed too much coffee. So first of all, you need to avoid coffee as much as possible as well as raw fruits and veggies such as beans and legumes. Because they contains indigestible saccharides.
But the most important thing is to get rid of anxiety, the cause of IBS. Exercise is a key to a healthy life. It is the simplest, but most transformative home remedy for anxiety and every health problem. It not only strengthens your body, but also makes you happier. If you do exercises for only 15-30 minutes every day, anxiety can be prevented effectively.
And I highly recommend you drink chamomile tea on a daily basis. Then you will be very surprised about its amazing effects. Chamomile is loaded with the antispasmodic property and rich in the amount of tannins which can excellently provide a great source of relief of IBS symptoms, including diarrhea. This kind of flower also aids in treating both the inflammation in the intestines and abdominal spasms. Moreover, there are many useful nutrients in chamomile tea that may improve the relaxation.
Take 2-3 spoons of chamomile tea. You can use dried chamomile tea or squeeze the leaves.
Mix it with hot water and steep the mixture.
After 5 minutes of steeping, the mixture should be strained.
Honey or cinnamon can be mixed if you prefer.
Consume it several times per day until you feel better.
https://authorityremedies.com/home-r...owel-syndrome/
http://www.health.harvard.edu/diseas...-to-manage-ibs
In case, you're allergic to chamomile, you can apply the treatment for ibs with peppermit oil instead.
rose10 is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the VeggieBoards forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
If you do not want to register, fill this field only and the name will be used as user name for your post.
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in


Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off