Getting enough protein? - VeggieBoards
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#1 Old 08-11-2013, 11:19 AM
 
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Ideas on how to add protein to diet (without much fat, got plenty of that already)? ;)

 

Also I was wondering if I could add peanut butter to a milk alternative, blend it together and then pour it over cereal? But doesn't pb have much more fat than protein.... help?

 

Are protein bars a waste of money? I've heard they have a high sugar content.

Is protein powder worth the price?

 

Thank you.

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#2 Old 08-11-2013, 11:53 AM
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Here's a great article on protein sources and getting enough: https://www.veggieboards.com/a/plant-protein

As for protein bars and powders, I think a lot of them can be junk. Protein bars especially often seem to be glorified chocolate bars with some vitamins added to them. Personally I avoid them entirely and focus on getting nutrition from whole plant foods, but others here might have more info on what brands are better than others. I've heard Vega is pretty good.

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#3 Old 08-11-2013, 02:16 PM
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It is generally easier than you think. You just have to think outside the box. smiley.gif

If you like, it's a good idea to calculate exactly how many grams of protein that your body needs based on your body weight and activity level. You don't need to, but if you do you can sleep better at night knowing you've got the amount in for the day haha. Here's an example calculator but you can google around for other info: http://www.webefit.com/Calculators/Calc_protein.html

Do creative things like adding nuts to oatmeal in the morning, quinoa I heard is good, too, beans, tofu, etc. I'm not a huge fan of the fake meats/cheeses (they are a little *too* processed for my taste) but that might be an option for you. I personally am in love with nut butters!

As an example, my bowl of oatmeal every morning has 15 grams of protein. Pow. It's 1/2 cup oatmeal (5 grams protein), 1/4 cup almonds or walnuts (about 6 grams protein), 1 tbsp chia seeds (3 grams protein, but it's expensive sad.gif however it doubles as source of omega 3's and keeps you feeling satiated as well), and 1 cup of almond milk (1 gram, soy milk has more but I try not to rely on soy too much, as it disrupts hormones). For me that's half my baseline recommended amount according to that calculator if I don't exercise that day. (although I generally do) And that's just breakfast!

It's fun and easier than you think! Good luck! smiley.gif
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#4 Old 08-11-2013, 02:32 PM
 
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... There is no conclusive evidence that soy disrupts hormones, it's based purely on theory but experimental and observational studies have not concluded it to be true. 25% of children are raised on soy formula and likely soy milk afterwards, primarily due to allergies yet there is no massive phenomenon occurring in them. That being said, a diverse diet is always best. Hemp, beans, grains like quinoa or buckwheat, nuts in small amounts and some soy products. If you're really worried about the so called hormone risk, use fermented soy products.
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#5 Old 08-11-2013, 03:41 PM
 
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Thank you!


My lunch usually consists of 25g high protein muesli (5g), 90ml unsweetened almond milk (0g), and a serving of fruit (0g). I am trying to lose weight however want to feel less hungry all the time.

Nuts are quite expensive, but what would you recommend in terms of high protein-low calorie ratio (and maybe taste too).

 

 http://www.hollandandbarrett.com/pages/product_detail.asp?pid=4958&prodid=6047

250g Pea protein

10g serving (35 kcal) =8g protein

Look worth the money?

 

 

 

1 Nakd Cocoa/Berry Delight Bar nutrition

Cals: 135

Fat: 5g

Carbs: 17g

Fibre: 2

Sugar: 15g

Protein: 3g

 

0.5 Trek Cocoa Brownie Bar nutrition

Cals: 112

Fat: 2g

Carbs: 18g

Fibre: 3g

Sugar: 13g

Protein: 6g

 

What about half, or a quarter, of a Trek bar each day? The stats don't look too bad, especially next to Nakd, which I used to eat.

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#6 Old 08-11-2013, 04:24 PM
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Green machine-for sure. I've heard counter arguments, (I think people even diss bananas, you can find pros and cons of anything) that's just my personal preference as well. smiley.gif Soy has begun to start hurting my tummy anyways, so I'm afraid I'm developing an allergic reaction, which I've heard can happen from consuming too much of it, too. All in moderation. smiley.gif

Oh, hanisdead, I forgot you wanted low fat foods. I think in that case your best bet would be to research beans. I know black beans are notorious for being packed with protein but low on fat.

Also-about the nutrition bar thing, I'd have to agree with werewolf girl on this one. They are generally not good for you, but don't hurt on occasion. (again, moderation) I've recently got into making my own nutrition bars, they take little effort if you make them raw and you can also control all the ingredients you put in them. Try looking up recipies and find one that fits your needs, or tweak ones you find to again fit your needs.

The pea protein looks expensive to me. I also highly recommend relying more whole, natural foods to get your nutrition, not processed (anything that looks like it/its components didn't come out of the ground). Mother nature definitely has it for you all right there, or else we would have starved a long, long time ago! tongue3.gif Yes, I drink processed almond "milk" and eat baked snap pea crisps once in a while, but I try to limit my intake of those things. The pea protein might be worth a shot for you, however, and you might be able to find it cheaper somewhere on sale or in bulk. You listen to your needs. That's what counts most when switching over to a plant based diet!
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#7 Old 08-11-2013, 04:36 PM
 
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Would it be weird to put red kidney beans in my muesli? xD

 

The food/ingredient doesn't have to be low-fat, but low calorie (although fat does contain the highest energy content per gram).

 

Could you help me add a protein ingredient to my lunch, or plan a protein based snack for later in the day (preferably under 120cals)? Or both?

This would be much appreciated, thank you.

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#8 Old 08-11-2013, 09:11 PM
 
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Why not add hemp seeds to your muesli? And better than protein bars would be some hemp protein powder, big investment but if youre not using it for muscle building but rather just as part of your diet it will last a long time. I've had mine over a month, but I don't use it every single day. The one I have is manitoba hemp harvest, hemp pro 50, which has 15 grams of protein for every 3 tbsp serving but you can get one which is even higher and, obviously, has less of the fat. You can mix it into smoothies for breakfast or dessert, super easy and delicious protein source.. No cooking involved, if that's why you're not into beans right now smiley.gif
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#9 Old 08-11-2013, 11:55 PM
 
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I really don't worry about my protein intake as I believe I get enough from veggies, grains, beans, nuts & seeds. I have a big pack of pea protein which I make a shake with at the minute but that's because I have 4 football matches a week. I probably don't even need it but it was reasonably cheap.

If any of you are in the UK myprotein.co.uk currently have their vegan blend on sale 1kg is £7.99 rather than £17.99. Bargain if you play a lot of sports and need a protein boost.
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#10 Old 08-12-2013, 03:09 AM
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protein bars, avoid buying, indeed sugar and also pricey, you can always make them yourself.

 

Otherwise i favour lentils and quinoa often and plenty of other stuff less often for purely personal reasons,

 

but proteins are not something hard to come by, you should be able to get more than enough without worrying about it, as long as you eat a variety of growing things.



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#11 Old 08-12-2013, 03:16 AM
 
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Thank you.

 

I did find some other good sources of protein.

 

Frozen garden peas - 80g serving: 60 calories: 5g protein

Beansprouts - 155g serving (1 of 5 a day): 55 calories: 4.6g protein

Frozen sweetcorn - 3 heaped tablespoons: 95 calories: 3g protein

(Sainsbury's home brand) Reduced salt yeast extract - 4g serving: 10 calories: 2g protein

Marigold's vegan bouillon vegetable stock - 5g serving: 16 calories: 0.7g protein

 

 

By the way, can you freeze green smoothies?

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#12 Old 08-12-2013, 05:52 AM
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not sure what you mean by green smoothies, but you can freeze smoothies to make ice batonets for example ?

 

You would loose some health benefits between consuming a smoothie immediately and freezing then unfrozing it.



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#13 Old 08-12-2013, 07:03 AM
 
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That list didn't include anything particularly rich in protein. Those I consume are....

Kidney beans
Black beans
Chickpeas
Lentils
Tempeh/tofu (try to limit to 2-3 servings a week)
Almond milk
Peanuts
Mixed seeds
Green leafy veg
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#14 Old 08-12-2013, 07:48 AM
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Do you have a physically demanding job or hobby? Do you have extra requirements for protein?

You can easily get enough protein if you eat enough calories from a variety of plants.
You don't need to seek out protein rich food, just eat enough calories.

Both of the bars you listed have entirely too much sugar. Sugar is detrimental to weight loss.

A good snack is a handful of nuts, hummus, or nut butter on celery.
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#15 Old 08-12-2013, 08:24 PM
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http://www.veganhealth.org/articles/protein

 

Don't concentrate on protein in general. Concentrate on getting enough lysine.

 

Seriously. Learning about lysine made such a difference for me I feel the need to tell all new vegans. Just eating enough calories didn't fill me up.

 

Of course enough calories and enough fat are important for feeling full too.

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#16 Old 08-12-2013, 10:01 PM
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]You can make your breakfast with soy milk, one cup of soy milk has 7~8 grams of protein, if that is all the soy you're eating in the day there isn't anything to worry about.

In any case, legumes are the protein power house of the plant kingdom. One cup of your typical bean has 15~18 grams of protein and is only around 200 calories. There is a big variety so its hard to get sick of them as well. If you eat legumes like one usually would eat meat, you'll get more than enough quality protein.
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#17 Old 08-12-2013, 10:10 PM
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As an example, my bowl of oatmeal every morning has 15 grams of protein. Pow. It's 1/2 cup oatmeal (5 grams protein), 1/4 cup almonds or walnuts (about 6 grams protein), 1 tbsp chia seeds (3 grams protein, but it's expensive sad.gif however it doubles as source of omega 3's and keeps you feeling satiated as well), and 1 cup of almond milk
Nuts (most of them) and oats have similar amounts of protein per calorie, one could skip the nuts and just double the oatmeal and it would be a lot cheaper.

I don't know why nuts are usually associated with protein, per calorie they aren't much different than grains.
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#18 Old 08-13-2013, 08:49 AM
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I don't know why nuts are usually associated with protein, per calorie they aren't much different than grains.

Because per ounce nuts provide significantly more calories and protein. 1 ounce of brown rice is 31 calories and 0.6 grams protein, 1 ounce of almonds is 160 calories and 6 grams of protein.
when comparing protein per calorie, nuts have around twice as much as grains: 160 calories of brown rice is about 3.15 grams of protein, 160 calories of almonds is 6 grams of protein.
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#19 Old 08-13-2013, 11:32 AM
 
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Nuts, soy beans and soy milk, whole grains (brown rice, wheat berries!, qinuoa all have about 5 grams of protein per serving). Also whole grain breads (Alvarado St. Bakery has awesome tasting breads with about 5 grams per slice). And of course tofu !

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#20 Old 08-13-2013, 11:41 AM
 
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Thank you everyone for your suggestions! ^^
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#21 Old 08-13-2013, 01:20 PM
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Because per ounce nuts provide significantly more calories and protein. 1 ounce of brown rice is 31 calories and 0.6 grams protein, 1 ounce of almonds is 160 calories and 6 grams of protein. when comparing protein per calorie, nuts have around twice as much as grains: 160 calories of brown rice is about 3.15 grams of protein, 160 calories of almonds is 6 grams of protein.
Nuts are certainly more caloric than grains, but for protein you want to look at the amount per calorie and nuts don't have significantly more protein on this measure than grains. You are cherry picking one of the higher protein nuts and lower protein grains and then making a statement about all nuts and grains, but when you look at nuts and grains as a whole nuts don't have significantly more protein. Sticking to ~160 calorie servings , here is the protein content of 4 common nuts and grains:

Walnuts: 4 grams
Almonds: 6 grams
Cashew: 5 grams
Brazil nut: 3.5 grams

Oats: 5.2 grams
Brown rice: 3.5 grains
Whole wheat flour: 5.5 grams
Millet: 4 grams

So while the nuts have slightly more protein, on average, than grains the small spread between the two doesn't justify the common perception that nuts are "good for protein". If you consider the quality of the protein, and not just the amount, the grains are actually superior sources of protein.

In any case, legumes are the unquestioned "big daddy" of plant protein. Not only are they high in protein, but its high quality protein and is readily absorbed (80~90% which is nearly as good as protein in animal foods). Using the 160 calorie serving size from above:

Black beans: 12 grams
chickpea: 9.5 grams
Red lentil: 13 grams
Split peas: 11 grams
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#22 Old 08-13-2013, 05:51 PM
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There are some really awesome posts here, great thread! smiley.gif

I just discovered farro over the weekend and have been using it as breakfast cereal now. It is a protein powerhouse. So that updates my breakfast "profile" from above to:

1/2 cup farro: 10 grams of protein (290 cals though)
1/4 cup walnuts: 6 g protein
1 cup almond milk (1 g protein)
1 tbsp chia seeds (3 g protein)

That's 20 grams of protein!!! For breakfast!!! Boom!!! I had that with a green smoothie the other day and I literally wasn't even remotely hungry until 1 or 1:30 (had breakfast around 7:30-8:30). And even then I just ate lunch to get it over with before some meetings at work. So despite the calories, the food lasted a LONG time!!!

So yeah...check out farro!

I never worried about protein when I started being veggie and it never was a problem even back then. I am more mindful about it now, but probably don't need to be, I just got that way because I started researching the overall quality of the food I eat now, so as a side benefit I usually know about what foods are good sources of protein (as well as calcium, iron, b12, etc) The "getting enough protein" issue is probably the biggest misconception about vegetarianism/veganism ever. So don't worry. smiley.gif
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#23 Old 08-13-2013, 06:23 PM
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I just discovered farro over the weekend and have been using it as breakfast cereal now. It is a protein powerhouse. So that updates my breakfast "profile" from above to:

1/2 cup farro: 10 grams of protein (290 cals though)
1/4 cup walnuts: 6 g protein
1 cup almond milk (1 g protein)
1 tbsp chia seeds (3 g protein)

That's 20 grams of protein!!! For breakfast!!! Boom!!! I had that with a green smoothie the other day and I literally wasn't even remotely hungry until 1 or 1:30 (had breakfast around 7:30-8:30)
10 grams of protein per ~300 calories is just moderate protein, oats have the same amount of protein so you could have just doubled the oats to achieve the same result. Just pointing this out because the OP mentioned costs and farro is expensive, where as oats are cheap.
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#24 Old 08-13-2013, 07:18 PM
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Good point, logic! yes.gif

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#25 Old 08-14-2013, 06:27 AM
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Even if you had the most physically demanding job, you shouldn't need more protein, specifically, than when you were a baby and growing at your fastest rate. And if you look at the most perfect food fod a baby rappidly doubling in size is mother's milk, which is 6% protein. I don't understand why you would give yourself such a headache to figure out what foods to eat when no human body has need for more than that much protein.  If you're a very active person, instead of focusing on one sole nutrient, just eat more! Just keep it to unprocessed plant food and you'll be fine.

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#26 Old 08-14-2013, 08:07 PM
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Even if you had the most physically demanding job, you shouldn't need more protein, specifically, than when you were a baby and growing at your fastest rate. And if you look at the most perfect food fod a baby rappidly doubling in size is mother's milk, which is 6% protein.
You can't base adult human nutritional needs on breast milk.

Infants consume dramatically more calories per body weight than adults so breast milk doesn't need to contain a high percent of protein, if adults were eating 10,0000~12,000 calories 6% protein would work just fine as well. But they don't, so they need a higher percent of protein.
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#27 Old 08-15-2013, 07:47 AM
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You can't base adult human nutritional needs on breast milk.

Infants consume dramatically more calories per body weight than adults so breast milk doesn't need to contain a high percent of protein, if adults were eating 10,0000~12,000 calories 6% protein would work just fine as well. But they don't, so they need a higher percent of protein.

You're right that a baby apparently needs approximately 120 calories per kilo of bodyweight. I'm not about to go and consume over 6000 calories in a day! But that's because I'm done growing. And as such, if I need less calories (proportionately), why on earth would I need more protein?

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#28 Old 08-15-2013, 01:55 PM
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You're right that a baby apparently needs approximately 120 calories per kilo of bodyweight. I'm not about to go and consume over 6000 calories in a day! But that's because I'm done growing. And as such, if I need less calories (proportionately), why on earth would I need more protein?
You don't need more protein per body mass than a baby, but since adults eat a lot less calories per body mass they need a diet that is richer in protein than human beast milk. But...one shouldn't be using the dietary needs of babies to conclude anything about the dietary needs of adults. Infants and adults have different dietary needs, for example infants (< 2 years old) need to consume cholesterol where as adults do not.

In any case, adult protein requirements should be based on studies on adults and its fairly easy to test for adequate protein intake by looking at one's nitrogen balance. Based on this, 10% of diet is the recommended amount but vegans, because plant protein is often absorbed at lower rates, may need a bit more.
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#29 Old 08-16-2013, 03:52 PM
 
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A little off topic, but could anyone tell me if Weetabix Chocolate Minis (UK) are vegan? I think they are..

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#30 Old 08-16-2013, 04:03 PM
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A little off topic, but could anyone tell me if Weetabix Chocolate Minis (UK) are vegan? I think they are..

 

Sorry to say they are not vegan according to the website :(  Mind you, it just says cross-contamination not that the product actually contains milk/lactose so it's up to you whether you want to eat them

 

http://www.weetabix.co.uk/products/cereals/weetabix-minis-chocolate-crisp#titleIngredients

 

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