I'm an obese vegan who wants to learn to eat right! Can anyone help? - VeggieBoards
Forum Jump: 
 
Thread Tools
#1 Old 12-18-2012, 01:32 AM
Beginner
 
VegPanda's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 125
I was a pescatarian from age 12-17 and vegetarian from age 17-19, and vegan from 19 to now, 22.

Since going through puberty I went from a stick to a very chunky girl.
My heaviest was in 2008 as a vegetarian, at 204 lbs.
I became vegan and lost a lot of weight, I ended up being 164 lbs before 2009 ended.
But now I've managed to gain 20 lbs back and I'm just tired of not eating right. I was not raised knowing how to cook food that didn't come out of a bag or box. I barely eat fresh produce each month. I need help!

I still live with my parents, in college, and in between jobs so I can't spend much.

What should I be eating!? What should I be buying?

Can anyone point me to a vegan meal plan with whole foods that isn't pricy and isn't hard to prepare? I don't need anything fancy, just easy things that can be found at local grocery stores will be best.

Eating Boca crumble tacos, pasta, tofurky sandwiches, Daiya cheese pizza bagels just isn't making me feel so vegan anymore, it makes me feel like junk! All I've done is veganized all the things my family raised me with.
VegPanda is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
#2 Old 12-18-2012, 01:48 AM
Veggie Regular
 
Bohom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Hampshire, UK
Posts: 318

Hi...wow, I could have written that post. I've always been heavier...not helped by my thyroid condition which means that no matter how much I exercise, my metabolism is slow.

 

On a budget could actually be beneficial to a more healthy diet - it'll keep you away from meat substitutes!

 

I was once almost 250lbs. I'm down a few dress sizes now, due to a variety of things:

 

-Eat healthier versions of the things you love. For example, something that I do to get rid of pizza cravings is to make my own sans-cheese. Get a pizza base (or make it) and top it with diced tomatoes, onions, peppers and mushrooms (if you don't buy organically veg is usually quite cheap) and you shouldn't miss the cheese! If you do, I've found that crumbling bits of tofu on top helps!

 

Switching to wholegrain pasta would be better for you - just add some tomato sauce (diced tomatoes again!)...

 

What I love the most (and find the most filling) are these two things: Smoothies - buy a bucketload of fruit (they usually have special offers on fruit), chop it up and freeze it, to use as needed. I sometimes use rice or soy milk to blend with the fruit - but if you want to cut down on calories, water is fine. A tip is to add a little agave syrup to sweeten. 

 

The other thing is a cheap and totally filling lentil stew. Just chop onions and whatever veggies you want, and add some vegetable stock, lentils and beans to it. Potatoes work well with it too. Cook for an hour or so, and it's totally filling!

 

With the sandwich, why not try toasting a nice piece of wholemeal bread and adding vegan pesto to it. Then pile it up with veggies - peppers work really well with that. 

 

There is a lot that is healthy and not over-the-moon expensive. Mainly I'd stick with beans, lentils (buy the dried beans and lentils - you cook them for 30 or so mins but you get a big bag for a cheaper price), fresh veg and frozen fruit. Eat wholegrain pastas and rice. 

Bohom is offline  
#3 Old 12-18-2012, 02:25 AM
I ♥ Vegan Guys ◕‿◕
 
4everaspirit's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 3,229
^^^^^

+1

You say you barely eat fresh produce and that you need help. There in lies the problem. You have to get yourself to eat more fresh produce. We can't make you do that, but we will definitely support you smiley.gif You can always also add in small bits of vegan junk with the fresh produce to make it taste better. I made a vegan ranch dressing and dipped veggies in it. I wouldn't say the ranch dressing is junk food, but you know what I'm trying to say. Experiment smiley.gif

"Why should man expect his prayer for mercy to be heard by What is above him when he shows no mercy to what is under him?" ~Pierre Troubetzkoy
4everaspirit is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
#4 Old 12-18-2012, 05:14 AM
Veggie Regular
 
'IckenNoodleSoup's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: not here
Posts: 1,468

Take it step by step and start simple.

 

Breakfast is a good place to start. Smoothies are fast and low in fat. Or a wholegrain cereal like muesli with soya milk is filling and will keep you full for a good amount of time.

 

As for learning to cook, the first thing I'd suggest, is get a cheap hand-held blender and start making yourself veggie soups and stews. As well as being low-fat (you don't need much, if any added oil to make soup) soup is probably the easiest of all cooking (chop veggies, add hot stock and lentils or tinned chickpeas or similar and simmer till cooked, then blend or leave chunky). And you can make soup from pretty much anything so it's a good way to do something with a vegetable that makes you think "What am I supposed to do with this?" A big pan of soup, once cooled and refrigerated will stay ready for you to eat whenever you want for up to a week. Really good option for supper after you get home from college.

 

Also start making yourself low-fat main-meal salads with a simple wholegrain starch base like brown rice, wholemeal pasta, couscous or quinoa. The dressing can be as simple as lemon juice and salt, cider vinegar or tomato juice. Again, super easy and a big bowl of filling low-fat brown rice, bulgar wheat or pasta salad will stay good covered in the fridge for several days. Boil up a batch of brown rice or pasta shells for example, add a selection of other things like diced red peppers, cooked frozen peas, tinned sweetcorn, diced cucumber, diced tomatoes, tinned black beans (rinsed) etc. Season with salt and pepper and toss with a little simple dressing like lemon juice, pepper and a little soy yogurt etc. Good for taking out in a plastic tub to eat for lunch at college/work.

 

If you eat sweets and puddings, start switching to fresh fruit salads, again chop up what you like, mix it together and cover with a little lemon juice and orange juice, cover and store in the fridge.

 

Once you feel confident making simple healthy dishes like soups, stews, wholegrain salads and fruit salads, start exploring slightly more complicated dishes like simple pasta sauces, pilafs and bakes. Look about online and try doing a new recipe once a week. See if you can get just six recipes down, a couple of vegetable soups, a thick beany stew, a tomato based pasta sauce, a simple pasta salad and a nutty brown rice pilaf say, just enough to form a minimal healthy menu from and then work from there. Just don't get disheartened if you mess up initially, learning any new skill takes practice. Once you get the cookery bug, you'll start to enjoy trying more things and you can forge more varied weekly menus from that. Being empowered to make informed choices while grocery shopping will help a lot to get you off the high-calorie low-nutrient ready-made products. Just be willing to give yourself time. 

 

Lastly, practice portion control. Use small bowls and plates. Eat slowly. Finish just before you think your completely full. This is easier if you have pre-prepared dishes in the fridge, like soups and salads. 

 

Oh, and don't forget to walk, wear a pedometer, work out how many steps you're currently doing each day and increase your goal of daily steps by ten percent each week.

 

A quick look online, and I found this archive which might be of use to you:

 

http://www.fatfree.com/recipes/


The sky is purple and things are right every day

'IckenNoodleSoup is offline  
#5 Old 12-19-2012, 03:40 AM
Newbie
 
SweetViolet's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by VegPanda View Post

I was a pescatarian from age 12-17 and vegetarian from age 17-19, and vegan from 19 to now, 22.
Since going through puberty I went from a stick to a very chunky girl.
My heaviest was in 2008 as a vegetarian, at 204 lbs.
I became vegan and lost a lot of weight, I ended up being 164 lbs before 2009 ended.
But now I've managed to gain 20 lbs back and I'm just tired of not eating right. I was not raised knowing how to cook food that didn't come out of a bag or box. I barely eat fresh produce each month. I need help!
I still live with my parents, in college, and in between jobs so I can't spend much.
What should I be eating!? What should I be buying?
Can anyone point me to a vegan meal plan with whole foods that isn't pricy and isn't hard to prepare? I don't need anything fancy, just easy things that can be found at local grocery stores will be best.
Eating Boca crumble tacos, pasta, tofurky sandwiches, Daiya cheese pizza bagels just isn't making me feel so vegan anymore, it makes me feel like junk! All I've done is veganized all the things my family raised me with.

VegPanda, I don't know if I'm going to be helpful or if you'll like my food, but I'll tell you what I eat daily.  First of all, I rarely, rarely, eat things like the mock meats, the Boca burgers, things like that.  First of all, they are expensive, and secondly, they are pretty processed.

 

I pretty much live off of lentils, dried beans, brown rice, vegetables, fruits, salads, oatmeal, oatbran. 

 

Since becoming vegetarian/vegan, I've lost over 25 pounds, and although weight loss is not the reason I became a vegetarian/vegan, it's a great benefit!

 

Almost every day, I make a pot of vegetable stew, with either lentils or some type of bean(kidney, pinto, chickpean, etc).  I add spices, usually curry powder or cumin, and vegetable stock cubes. (I used to also add brown rice, but lately have omited it. This is still a healthy addition)  I start chopping and adding veggies of all kinds: tomatoes, onion, okra, green beans, broccoli, orange bell peppers, mushrooms, carrots, spinach...basically anything I can shove in there to add nutrition and of course, bulk.

 

I know spices can be expensive, BUT I buy these in bulk online.  You will save huge if you do this, and frankly, spices were the only way I learned to eat a lot of my vegetables!blush.gif

 

Okay, so that big pot of lentil/bean/veggie stew is enough for two meals(although I confess I am a binger and often eat it all in a sitting).  It contains most of my daily protein and iron, and loads of my vitamins.  It's my powerhouse.  The rest of the day is salads and fruits.  Yes, some fruits are expensive, but others are still not: apples, bananas, grapefruits....just shop around and look for vegetable/fruit stands and sales.  In my city, we have little vegetable/fruit markets that are hidden away, little rough gems that have low overheads but charge very little and you can find things like apples for $1/pound, raspberries for $1/pound, orange bell pepper for $1/pound....amazing.  You just have to search.  Check out sites like yelp dot com and look for vegetable markets in your city.

 

Do you like tea? Cultivate a taste for some tea, because I'm thinking you need some comfort drink, and a nice, hot, cup of English black tea goes a long way to comfort a heart!!

 

Just remember, you are re-learning your sense of taste.  Don't be afraid to use herbs and spices if you have to, but stay away from the processed foods.

 

This is what I have in my fridge/pantry(keep in mind that a couple of my things are expensive, and I know you might not be able to buy them, like the wild rice and cherries)

 

Fruits/veggies:

broccoli

okra

green beans

spinach

turnip greens

orange bell pepper

onion

tomatoes

sweet potatoes

apples

bananas

kiwis

peaches

raspberries

mangos

cherries

strawberries

 

Dry goods:

brown rice

wild rice

lentils(French and green)

beans(Kidney, pinto, chickpea)

oatmeal

oat bran

 

canned goods

diced tomatoes

tomatoe paste

pumpkin

corn

 

vegetable stock cubes

bulk curry powder

bulk cumin powder

 

Soymilk(unsweetened)

 

Silk brand coffee "creamer"

 

sweetner

SweetViolet is offline  
#6 Old 12-19-2012, 05:44 AM
Veggie Regular
 
drowsyturtle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Durham, UK
Posts: 237
Due to unfortunate and irritating circumstances, I had to feed myself for £2 this week (excluding rice, beans, etc. that I already had in). I've had pasta with tomato and onion, chickpea curry, fried rice with peas and sweetcorn, stews, soups...

Including the price of the wholefoods I already had in the house, it probably cost me around £6 ($10 or so), and I've eaten very well. You just need to find out what vegetables you can buy cheaply in your area, and you can make pretty much anything you like using them. If there's any specific meals you want to know how to make cheaply, just ask! I'm also a student (not living with my parents), so I've had quite a lot of practice cooking to a budget wink3.gif

If I post anything offensive, it's society's fault, not mine.
drowsyturtle is offline  
#7 Old 12-19-2012, 11:18 AM
Veggie Regular
 
runnerveggie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 1,862
I have to admit that I too wind up eating many of the same foods your list. It is all to easy to fall into the habits we grew up with. Unfortunately, a vegan diet isn't an automatic ticket to good health. Eating healthy on a vegan diet doesnt have to be complicated, though. Even simply following the USDA MyPlate guidelines or the Harvard healthy eating plate provides a nice visual for balanced meals -- divide your plate approximately into quarters, and fill one quarter with grains (mostly whole grains), one with legumes or other protein rich foods (beans, soy foods, seitan), one with vegetables, and one with fruits. Frozen and canned veggies and fruits can be cheap and convenient. For fresh produce, look for what is on sale. Veggies like carrots, kale, celery, green bell peppers, green onions, white mushrooms and broccoli are almost always pretty affordable where I live, but that might vary for you. Root veggies like potatoes, sweet potatoes and onions are always pretty cheap. For fruit, apples, bananas and oranges are usually affordable, and look for other fruit to go on sale in season. Frozen fruit sometimes goes on sale, and canned fruit in juice or with no sugar added is good too. Consider buying conventional produce--that is what I buy because it is so much more affordable. Any health or environmental benefits of organic produce have yet to be definitively proven.

A few ideas for balancing out meals you are already eating:
Sauté or microwave some frozen veggies (zucchini and bell peppers are nice) to go on your tacos, eat them stuffed with lettuce, or make a big taco salad instead. Avocado gives a nice creaminess and has good fiber too--often I have guacamole instead of vegan cheese on tacos. Boca crumbles are low in fat and a good source of protein, so no need to give those up, but you can think about adding in some black beans, refried beans, or lentils for fiber and variety.

Mix in some broccoli or other veggies with your pasta--you can even add frozen broccoli to the cooking pasta to save in cleanup. Try mixing cooked lentils with your pasta sauce for protein and fiber. Whole wheat pasta is good too, and some brands are almost the same price as white pasta.

Try whole grain bread for your tofurkey sandwiches. Load up your sandwich with spinach, sliced tomatoes, cucumbers, whatever you like. Or, have a big serving of fruit or veggies on the side. Lately I like to have a big side of kale chips with a sandwich. Have a piece of fruit with lunch.

Add some veggies to your daiya pizza. Cooked and well drained frozen veggies are pretty good on pizza. One of my favorite pizzas is black olives and pineapple (both from cans). Not the absolute healthiest, but adding a little fiber and nutrition over just plain cheese. I often don't even put cheese on pizza when it is loaded with tasty veggies.

You might consider getting a few vegan cookbooks. There are several out there geared toward college students -- maybe you can get them from the library?
runnerveggie is offline  
#8 Old 12-19-2012, 02:49 PM
Veggie Regular
 
Move of Ten's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 3,157

I can't point to a meal plan, but I'll share some staple foods/meals that I like to eat a lot. I don't know much about cooking, these are just things that I happen to like the taste of and find easy to make...

 

(If you aren't experienced with making rice, I recommend learning. It may take a bit of trial and error the first couple times with respect to how long you steam it and how hot you keep the burner, but once you figure out a way that works it should be pretty easy from then on. It goes well with pretty much any bean, vegetable or lentil based meals.)

 

Here is a fast, easy dahl I've been eating a lot lately. I eat it with rice (from 2-4 cups dry) or both rice and tortillas: Combine 1 cup red lentils, 1 diced onion, 3 cloves minced garlic, 1 tsp cumin and 3 cups of water in a pot. Bring to a boil, then reduce to a simmer and cook for 15 minutes or until the lentils are mushy. Then add 1 tsp tumeric, 1 tsp cayenne and 1 large can of tomatoes (either diced or whole peeled which you can just tear up with your hands as you put them in) and optionally some oil or earth balance. Then let simmer a few more minutes. 

 

Easy soup, that I like: slice up half a cabbage with any combination of potatoes, carrots, onions and garlic (or anything else you like) to a boil with some water or vegetable stock, then reduce to a simmer and cook until the vegetables seem cooked enough. Add like 2-3 tbspns miso and give it some time to properly dissolve. Then any other spices you like (I like to put in some chili paste or sriracha). I use water rather than vegetable stock just because it's cheaper and because the miso keeps it from tasting watery.

 

If you're intimidated by cooking vegetables you can also just add some frozen vegetables to pasta, rice, beans or whatever. 

 

Oatmeal is easy to make and is good with soy milk and fruit (bananas, grapes, berries...)

 

Sandwich: peanut butter and sliced banana on whole wheat bread

 

Snack: apple + peanut butter 

 

If you've been eating a lot of daiya pizza bagels and mock meat products then you will probably be able to save money switching away from them even while buying fruits and vegetables, because those products are really expensive.

Move of Ten is offline  
#9 Old 12-20-2012, 01:45 AM
Potatotarian
 
badkelpie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 85

Everyone has such good advice, so I'll just add a couple simple recipes from my poor days.  I still eat them, cause they're so tasty.

 

The first one came about when I went to the cupboard and found only a small bit of rice, a can of pinto beans, a can of corn, and a can of diced tomatoes.  None of which I wanted to eat by itself, so I mixed them, added water, and cooked until the rice was done.  I added salt and chili powder.  It made several meals.  

 

Second one is a half a head of cabbage, shredded, 2 cups white beans, a bunch of water, half an onion, throw in other veggies if you like, add some cilantro and cayenne pepper and salt to taste.  Makes a very tasty hearty soup.  I like it with just a bit too much cayenne.

 

There are also veggie fajitas.  Cook (Saute?) bell peppers, onions, and mushrooms (and sometimes green beans) in some water (or coconut oil) and soy sauce, add garlic and cumin, eat with tortillas (or skip them, it's good either way).  If I have an avocado, I'll throw that on too.

badkelpie is offline  
#10 Old 12-20-2012, 09:16 AM
Newbie
 
Britt314's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 71

If you don't have a steamer- get one. Since buying a steamer I eat SO many more veggies! You can add a little margarine, salt, pepper or whatever. I try to slowly overtime decrease the amount of salt, and butter I use. Sometimes I use a little Italian dressing on a big flat bread of veggies and rice, very good and filling!

 

The thing that works out best for me when trying to eat healthier is tracking what I am eating, I use this: https://www.supertracker.usda.gov/foodtracker.aspx it maybe too much work for some, but it works as an incentive for me when I see I have high graphs on veggies and fruits.

 

Also your in college and working usually, so do you normally eat worse at school or at home? doing homework and planning on eating where you eat best might help. Don't be too hard on yourself, and take it slowly, you want this to be your new way of eating not a crazy month long diet. I wish you the best of luck in eating healthier, and let us know how it's going!


the truth resists simplicity- John Green

Britt314 is offline  
#11 Old 12-20-2012, 10:49 AM
Veggie Regular
 
luxdancer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Posts: 379
Quote:
Originally Posted by Britt314 View Post

If you don't have a steamer- get one. Since buying a steamer I eat SO many more veggies! You can add a little margarine, salt, pepper or whatever. I try to slowly overtime decrease the amount of salt, and butter I use. Sometimes I use a little Italian dressing on a big flat bread of veggies and rice, very good and filling!

 

If you can't afford a steamer, if you have a stock pot and a large metal strainer/sieve around the house (usually one does), that can do in a pinch. Put about an inch or two of water in the stockpot, hang the metal strainer over the lip of the stockpot in a matter where it is stable, chop some veggies and toss them into the strainer. Steam, and presto!


I always wonder about people who say they "love" animals, but continue to eat meat. If that's your idea of love, I question what sort of twisted world view you must have.

luxdancer is offline  
#12 Old 12-20-2012, 06:23 PM
Newbie
 
sanmc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: Lake Ontario, Canada
Posts: 11

Above post by "Sweet Violet" with the list is about right for a good start,

 

Give up WHEAT and wheat products. This includes > whole wheat, white flour used for thickening dressings, custards, etc. Wheat will make you gain weight or continually keep the weight on. It turns to sugar. It's all genetically modified. It'll make you sick.

 

The adverse affects on health is in unusual ways that you would not suspect wheat to be the culprit, like: cravings, digestive upsets, inflamed muscles and swollen joints, brain fog, bowel disturbances, bloated feeling, mood changes, behavior changes, stressed out and the list goes on and on. (from the book "Wheat Belly" by William Davis, MD.) it's shocking and scarey what it does to the body / mind.

 

Replace wheat with these flours amaranth, quinoa, buckwheat, brown rice, bean flour and millet (if you like it), arrowroot powder, and nut flours ei: almond or seed flours grind them yourself and products made of these. Go easy on the rice. Eat more nuts and seeds. Fill your plate with 70-80% veggies and the rest protein. You can your carbohydrates from starchy veggies as well. Eating raw works great too. Make a green smoothie when you don't want to cook, throw in your fav veggies and some fresh lime juice and herbal or green tea.

 

I've been trying desperately to give up wheat, and feeling great, no acidic heart burn, upset stomach or painful swollen knuckle joints. I know when I've eaten wheat, I suffer. It's not easy but . . . get healthy.

 

A few of my thoughts, take what you like and toss the rest. Keep motivated, you can do it for you. Learn about food, become knowledgeable and you can make choices that are right for you.

.

regards

sanmc is offline  
#13 Old 12-20-2012, 06:47 PM
Veggie Regular
 
runnerveggie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 1,862
http://www.theveganrd.com/2011/04/weight-control-the-vegan-way.html - here is a good blog post on weight control by vegan registered dietitian, Virginia Messina. If I were making the list, I would put exercise first as I know that is key for me. Relatively small changes in eating habits work well for me if I exercise on a regular basis. Planned exercise can also help curb overeating -- if I know I'm going for a run, I am less likely to stuff myself with a big meal beforehand.
runnerveggie is offline  
#14 Old 12-22-2012, 08:15 PM
Veggie Regular
 
ElaineV's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Posts: 4,026
Quote:
Originally Posted by RunnerVeggie View Post

http://www.theveganrd.com/2011/04/weight-control-the-vegan-way.html - here is a good blog post on weight control by vegan registered dietitian, Virginia Messina. If I were making the list, I would put exercise first as I know that is key for me. Relatively small changes in eating habits work well for me if I exercise on a regular basis. Planned exercise can also help curb overeating -- if I know I'm going for a run, I am less likely to stuff myself with a big meal beforehand.

Agreed. This article is great.
I would also put exercise first.
Also id suggest a food diary. Simply writing down what you eat can really help.
ElaineV is offline  
#15 Old 12-22-2012, 09:22 PM
Veggie Regular
 
Move of Ten's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 3,157

Definitely try to exercise if possible, but if you can't bring yourself to exercise consistently don't let it get you down. It can be hard to summon the will power and motivation to exercise when you're depressed, especially for those of us who can't just ride the endorphin kick that some people seem to. Personally I can usually only bring myself to exercise if it's something fun like playing tennis or badminton or racketball. Otherwise I just get too bored to do it day after day. You can improve your health and lose weight without exercising, even if that might not be optimal. 

Move of Ten is offline  
#16 Old 12-27-2012, 01:31 AM
Banned
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: California
Posts: 2,108
If exercise produced sustainable weight loss gyms wouldn't be filled with overweight people...... Exercise will build muscle, it will improve your cardiovascular system....but it doesn't do much to solve an obesity problem. To solve an obesity problem you need to change your diet, you need to consume low-fat and lower density foods. In the case of a vegan diet, that means switching as much as possible to a diet of whole plant foods without added oils/fats and sugars. So for example, a bowl of lentil soup with some whole wheat bread (with no butter). Also, though eating more vegetables is good, if you cover them with fat (olive oil, butter, etc) its just going to promote weight gain. You need to focus on eating higher calorie low-fat plant foods (legumes, grains, potatoes, etc).

Wheat doesn't cause weight gain, instead the fats people tend to eat with it.
logic is offline  
#17 Old 12-28-2012, 09:43 AM
Newbie
 
sanmc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: Lake Ontario, Canada
Posts: 11

Sorry, Logic I can't debate your statement, umm, I'm just the messenger about Wheat. It's Dr. William Davis who is the expert and researcher > "Wheat Belly" book. Goggle info.
 

Quote from Logic:
Wheat doesn't cause weight gain, instead the fats people tend to eat with it.

Try the wheat thingy yourself and give some feed back. . . ? Unless you are from the wheat marketing board ?  Then . . .    . . .

 

I do agree with you, that over abundance of fats and oils do, and will bring about weight gain. However, the body does need the right oils to function, mostly from nuts, seeds and plant fruits (olive). When I was trying to reverse diabetes I had no fats or oils on my Dr. Barnard diet, so that the cells could get rid of the gummed up membrane. This to allow insulin to open the lock on the cell door letting the sugar from the blood stream to enter and then, it burn up as energy and feeling good.

 

Now I eat nuts and seeds daily. My main concern with eating them is about the critical nutrition and minerals they offer for health - portion size is the key factor. For example 1-2 brazillian nuts gives daily supply of selenium and 2-3 almonds a day you never have to worry about cancer due to the enzyme found in almonds. Soaked or sprouted are best. If allergic: blanch the almonds and remove the brown skin, it's the problem. Live strong website says almonds and raw garlic leads to weight loss - search the site. I could agree with that from my personal experience when I was reversing diabetes. I eat lots now too.

 

I'm also not overly concerned about eating a little olive oil as Dr. Weil recommends, I'm cautious due to fact it is so-o-o concentrated, like all oils are. I try to eat up to 1 tablespoon of coconut oil a day > Dr. Oz: "it contributes to weight loss" (search on his website Doctor Oz).

 

Keep up with being good to yourself and your body.

.

regards

sanmc

.

sanmc is offline  
#18 Old 12-29-2012, 01:20 AM
Banned
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: California
Posts: 2,108
Quote:
Originally Posted by sanmc View Post

Sorry, Logic I can't debate your statement, umm, I'm just the messenger about Wheat. It's Dr. William Davis who is the expert and researcher > "Wheat Belly" book. Goggle info.
Right just the messenger...for a message that isn't accurate. William Davis is a MD, he isn't an expert in nutrition and isn't a "researcher" (i.e., he isn't a scientist). Wheat belly is just a repackaged low-carb diet book, nothing more. He complains about wheat....yet his dietary recommendations go far beyond the elimination of wheat. The anti-wheat message is just the vehicle....for the low-carb (and largely meat based) diet. Furthermore, William Davis is overweight...... I don't know, shouldn't a guy that claims to have unlocked the secrets of obesity be.......I don't know.....slim?

The only fats the body needs are relatively small amounts of omega-3 and omega-6. You don't need to consume added fats, nuts, seeds, etc to obtain these fats, they are contained in small amounts in just about all plants. Nuts and seeds have no "critical nutrition and minerals" that can't be obtained by other (low fat) plant foods.
 
2~3 almonds a day will prevent cancer? Ugh......

As for trying "no wheat", for what purpose? What is it going to achieve? With that said...I often go without wheat for weeks. Just not because I think its bad, but because I prefer other things.
logic is offline  
#19 Old 12-30-2012, 08:22 PM
Veggie Regular
 
ElaineV's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Posts: 4,026
Cutting out wheat might result in weight loss but unless you have celiac disease or gluten-intolerance it's probably not wise to eliminate all wheat from your diet.

Cutting out added oils is more likely to result in weight loss, plus it's less nutritionally risky. If I were you (heck I am you right now - I could stand to lose plenty of weight) I would focus on reducing or eliminating oils.

Bottom line: both wheat and oil can be eaten in moderation in a healthy diet. Obese people tend to eat too much of both foods.
ElaineV is offline  
#20 Old 12-30-2012, 09:04 PM
Newbie
 
1vegforlife's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 43

I'm think SweetViolet gave some great advice. I eat pretty much the same way she does ( fruits,veggies,whole grains, and legumes daily). I still eat process foods occasionally(mock meats), but I am a work in progress and I still managed to lose 6 pounds in a month. I eat a lot too. I also walk at least 30 minutes a day 4-5 times a week. Walking is a great way to lose weight and it's cost nothing but a good pair of walking shoes. It also helps to lift your mood when you walk outside. The sun and the fresh air is good for you. I even walk in the Winter.

1vegforlife is offline  
#21 Old 01-02-2013, 02:30 PM
Beginner
 
seashells's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: California
Posts: 127

Regarding the wheat thing, I lost 40 lbs while still eating wheat, so I kind of raise an eyebrow at books like Wheat Belly or when people complain carbs (as in all carbs) are the problem. Low-carb diets DO often cause weight loss, but not in ways I personally feel comfortable with (starving your body of glucose from carbs forces it to convert fat to glucose instead, which is a more difficult process for it). Carbs are our body's preferred source of glucose, which we need for fuel and brain health, and choosing the right carbs (i.e. complex carbs/whole grains/starchy veggies rather than things like refined sugar or white bread) shouldn't hinder your attempts to lose weight. I eat 21 grain whole wheat bread several times a week, and some kind of carb at every meal, and I find it doesn't interfere with my weight maintenance at all. 

 

What helped me with losing weight was limiting simple carbs and sugars. Like eating whole wheat bread instead of white bread, brown rice pasta instead of white pasta, etc. I also limit my oil intake (I still use olive oil on occasion, mostly in cold dishes, but rarely cook with oil). And I cut out dairy completely, but if you're already vegan then you've done that already.

 

The only times I find myself gaining weight again these days (like over Christmas) are when I stop being strict about sugar, oil, and white flours. That always puts on a few pounds. But once I get back on the healthy eating it goes back down fairly quickly.

 

I also try not to eat processed foods that often, like mock meats or frozen meals, because they're not always the healthiest. I still have them on a rare occasion, but cooking from scratch with fresh foods is your best bet. It doesn't have to be complicated or expensive (in fact it's generally cheaper I've found). There's a lot you can make with basic staples like beans, canned tomatoes, potatoes, your choice of whole grains, and some fresh veggies. You can do sandwiches on whole grain bread with your favorite veggies and some hummus and/or avocado, soups, cheeseless pizza (whole wheat pizza crust topped with hummus or tomato sauce and lots of veggies), loaded baked potatoes (with beans and veggies), whole wheat/brown rice pastas with veggies, salads, etc.

 

Their site appears to be temporarily down right now, but the Engine 2 blog did an article a little while ago on healthy vegan meals on a budget. May contain some helpful info for you once the site's back up! http://engine2diet.com/the-daily-beet/the-college-greens-plant-strong-on-a-budget/

 

Edit: Oh, one purchase I can recommend as being worth the money is a blender, if you don't already have one of those. They are so useful in helping you prepare stuff from scratch. I can toss chickpeas and garlic and tahini in there and instantly have oil-free hummus. Or canned tomatoes, garlic, and spices to make an oil-free tomato sauce! It really helps me avoid having to buy products in stores that might be loaded with salt or oil or sugar or other things I don't want to be eating a lot of. It also probably saves me money in the long run because a can of chickpeas + few cloves of garlic is cheaper than a tub of store bought hummus.

seashells is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the VeggieBoards forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
If you do not want to register, fill this field only and the name will be used as user name for your post.
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in


Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off