Do most vegetarians eat eggs & milk? - VeggieBoards
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#1 Old 06-22-2008, 12:11 AM
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I'm new to vegetarianism and I'm trying to figure out what to do about dairy. I've given up all meat completely and that's been fairly easy for me. Now that I know the horrors that happen in the meat industry, meat just doesn't seem that appetizing anymore. I know that dairy cows also have bad lives, though, so I hate the idea of drinking milk. But it seems like it's in everything! I can use soy milk instead of regular milk for cooking and eating cereal and stuff. But how do I get away from eating it in other things? It seems like everywhere I look there is food with eggs or milk in the ingredients. I'm feeling very frustrated. Also, I miss cheese.... I really used to love cheese. I know that's kind of silly, but it's what I'm struggling with at the moment.
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#2 Old 06-22-2008, 12:50 AM
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Perhaps you could start by cutting out eating processed food, and eat more naturally? There is definitely no dairy or eggs in vegetables, fruit, grains, cereals, pulses, etc.



Everyone misses cheese in the beginning. That's because cheese has a substance in it (caseine) that is addictive. Once your body has weaned itself from this addiction, you'll be fine. Right now you're a caseine addict, just like a heroine addict is addicted to heroine.
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#3 Old 06-22-2008, 06:55 AM
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It's true, I LOVED cheese as a l/o veg, and I missed it horribly when I gave up dairy. But now (only about 4 months later) I don't miss it at all...



Diana also has a good suggestion about trying to eat more naturally. That's how I made my gradual transition. I don't eat that many processed foods so it's easy to avoid milk/egg additives.
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#4 Old 06-22-2008, 07:13 AM
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It's a process. You may find that eventually you can taste the eggs and milk most of the time and don't want to eat whatever it's in because it tastes foul. If you're trying to get away from eggs and milk just do your best, it'll eventually all come together.



I know tons of vegetarians who eat eggs and milk, just not meat. I try to avoid them because I don't want to support the industry, but it's a personal decision not a rule.
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#5 Old 06-22-2008, 07:22 AM
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You could also attempt to buy only local and/or organic eggs and dairy until you wean yourself completely. Often times animals at these establishments are better treated than at conventional operations and the slightly higher prices make over indulgence less likely if you're on a budget. Good luck!



Heather
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#6 Old 06-22-2008, 07:44 AM
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I agree with eating more naturally. The first month I went vegan, I cooked everything from scratch at home. And I spent my time learning how to read labels. I'm really lucky though, a lot of the bread around here is milk and egg free. And I know here that most every product that has eggs, milk, animal products in it have an allergy warning at the end of the ingrediant list which is easy to check first. Also perhaps start eating foods with a short ingrediant list, and without things you can't identify.



It can get frustrating, especially when you find a milk ingrediant in something that doesn't make any sense (one brand of Dill Pickle chips around here, which I was addicted too, man that frustrates me). You may need to change from brands you are used to to ones you never even tried or considered before.
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#7 Old 06-22-2008, 08:32 AM
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If you want to give up eggs and dairy completely, there's lots of good advice on the vegan forum.
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#8 Old 06-22-2008, 09:08 AM
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I used to consume tons of dairy, but now drink very vanilla soy or vanilla almond milk. I also have some hemp milk, plain, for recipes that call for a plain milk, not sweet. In my stores (Walmart & Krogers), in the organic section by produce, I find Galaxy Veggie Patch cheeses, that are not vegan, though. They are a soy cheese in cheddar and swiss flavors, and use vegetable rennet, not animal, but they use casein (bacteria grown on milk protein). I do not find them addictive and no longer use cheese everywhere, like I used to. They also make a shaker thing of Parmesan in the Veggie Patch. Now if you have a store like Whole Foods or Trader Joe's close by, you can get the Vegan versions. I have to go on a 'field trip' to get to one of those stores, the last time I found some Galaxy versions of their vegan line, like the Vegan Parmesan topping and the vegan mozerelli slices (instead of swiss). I also found some Vegan RELLA in cheddar, but have not tasted it yet.
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#9 Old 06-22-2008, 10:18 AM
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Thanks for all the advice. I think eating more naturally is key. I don't mind eating more naturally (as in I like most veggies, fruits, and nuts), but being a grad student I often feel that I don't have time to cook meals from scratch. Lately, I feel like I've been existing on whatever vegetarian food I can grab on my way out the door. (Usually this means strawberries, bananas, or nuts). Does anyone have a good vegan cookbook that they would recommend? I really need to learn how to cook all over again.
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#10 Old 06-22-2008, 11:01 AM
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La Dolce Vegan is great, in my opinion. It has more simple ingredients and most of the recipes take about thirty minutes to make, which is great for me when I'm in school.
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#11 Old 06-22-2008, 11:12 AM
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Originally Posted by Bells View Post

La Dolce Vegan is great, in my opinion. It has more simple ingredients and most of the recipes take about thirty minutes to make, which is great for me when I'm in school.



I've had La Dolce Vegan for 7 months and I've never made anything from it. I'd suggust, if you can, going to a bookstore and leafing through a few different ones. I personally use Vegan with a Vengance all the time, but others never touch it.



Also the recipe section here on the boards is awesome. I have a big pile printed off.
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#12 Old 06-22-2008, 11:30 AM
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Wow...I just discovered the recipe section. This is awesome!
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#13 Old 06-22-2008, 02:21 PM
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You said vegetarianism, so I can't say anything concerning dairy since that would be involving veganism, but if you are trying to become vegan than yes, go to the vegan forum.
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#14 Old 06-22-2008, 06:40 PM
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I love Vegan with a Vengance! I use it a lot. Everything I've made out of it has turned out great!

~kathy
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#15 Old 06-22-2008, 11:56 PM
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You can be a vegetarian without eating eggs (or cheese) or drinking milk. If you want to give them up, I'd suggest first becoming aware of what they are in, and then cutting out any dairy products, or all dairy products, that you don't feel comfortable consuming. I know it must be difficult to give up things you are used to and have developed a taste for, but one interesting thing that happens when you give up those favorite foods is that you can introduce yourself to new foods and combinations that you may have never thought of before, i.e. veggie sandwich instead of cheese sandwich, a host of new "milks" to choose from, etc.



Anyway, if you're having trouble cutting it all out at once, you could start with the obvious things like a glass of milk and grilled cheese sandwich, and make a commitment to reading labels, and finding out what is in the other things you are eating. You can do it slowly if that helps you do it better. Just make a choice about each thing you eat. Sometimes you'll miss something, or make a decision you might regret later, but just keep going forward until you are at a place you want to be with regards to your diet.

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#16 Old 06-23-2008, 02:36 AM
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Why yes, they do.



Because if they didn't, they'd be vegans.



=P
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#17 Old 06-23-2008, 03:12 AM
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Originally Posted by arcane View Post

I've had La Dolce Vegan for 7 months and I've never made anything from it. I'd suggust, if you can, going to a bookstore and leafing through a few different ones. I personally use Vegan with a Vengance all the time, but others never touch it.



I suggested it because it is the cookbook I learned to cook with. It also has several good everyday recipes with few ingredients, so it's easy to make when studying for a test or when you have a lot of homework to do.



I think you should give the book more of a chance. You might be surprised. If anything, make something out of the dessert section or try the easy french loaf.
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#18 Old 06-23-2008, 03:25 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ashshea View Post

I'm new to vegetarianism and I'm trying to figure out what to do about dairy. I've given up all meat completely and that's been fairly easy for me. Now that I know the horrors that happen in the meat industry, meat just doesn't seem that appetizing anymore. I know that dairy cows also have bad lives, though, so I hate the idea of drinking milk. But it seems like it's in everything! I can use soy milk instead of regular milk for cooking and eating cereal and stuff. But how do I get away from eating it in other things? It seems like everywhere I look there is food with eggs or milk in the ingredients. I'm feeling very frustrated. Also, I miss cheese.... I really used to love cheese. I know that's kind of silly, but it's what I'm struggling with at the moment.



When I decided I didn't want to eat meat any more, I went vegan straight away. There were people on this board who made me feel that being vegetarian (not vegan) alone simply wasn't good enough. After six months I gave up veganism, for my original intentment of simply not eating any living creature, as I realised that veganism just wasn't right for me.



It's your own personal decision. Don't let anyone make you feel that you *have* to stop consuming anything containing milk/eggs. Any little thing you can do is good enough, if it's the best you feel that you can do.

For example, some people just can't give up meat, and that's fair enough, but sometimes they opt for meat-free dishes during the week, which is making a difference. Maybe not on a super grand scale, but it's still a difference.



There are plenty of vegans out there who drive. The tyres contain animal based substances.

That doesn't mean to say they can't drive now. They're already doing the best that they can do. The same goes for vegans who still eat honey, or play guitar, which contains animal based glue.



I know people who consider themselves vegetarians, but still eat chicken and fish. I don't agree with it personally, but they are still making a difference.

Sometimes I still opt for soy milk instead of regular milk. I may not always, but when I do, I know that's making a small difference.



One thing you could consider, is not consuming milk straight up, but allowing small amounts of milk in some foods (some foods contain the teeniest tiniest amounts of milk ever).



Unfortunately, most foods available in your local supermarket probably do contain milk/eggs. Even tomato soup (my favourite), which really annoyed me when I was vegan. By complete surprise, I eventually found the "free from" section...Maybe your local supermarket has one? Try asking staff; I found also by complete surprise that there was also a frozen food vegetarian section, and a chilled food vegetarian section.



When I was vegan, the foods I really missed were cheese, eggs, and chocolate. Dairy free chocolate isn't bad, but it just doesn't beat Cadbury's I'm afraid.



And it's not silly at all. You were used to eating it.



You could try sticking it out, to see if the cravings disappear, but that doesn't work for everyone. Don't make yourself unhappy, and don't make yourself ill. Sometimes, feeling like you mustn't eat something makes you want it all the more. Maybe you could say to yourself "I could eat cheese if I wanted to but x tastes so much better"...



Just remember to do the best you can. You're already making a huge difference, so don't feel like you should do any more, but definitely consider how you could do more, if you feel that it's right for you.
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#19 Old 06-23-2008, 04:15 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ashshea View Post

Lately, I feel like I've been existing on whatever vegetarian food I can grab on my way out the door. (Usually this means strawberries, bananas, or nuts).



You could do worse than having a lunch of strawberries, bananas and nuts. In fact, it's often the kind of meal I make for myself even when I don't have to grab something in a rush.
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#20 Old 06-23-2008, 07:54 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Libera Mentis View Post

Why yes, they do.=P



Some do, not all.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Libera Mentis View Post

Because if they didn't, they'd be vegans.



=P



Depends on the definition you happen to be using for "vegan". (Also, vegans are vegetarian.)

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#21 Old 06-23-2008, 03:05 PM
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Originally Posted by Bells View Post

I suggested it because it is the cookbook I learned to cook with. It also has several good everyday recipes with few ingredients, so it's easy to make when studying for a test or when you have a lot of homework to do.



I think you should give the book more of a chance. You might be surprised. If anything, make something out of the dessert section or try the easy french loaf.



Nothing in the book looks appitizing to me. Frankly some of the ingrediant combinations have made me go "gross" just reading them.



Prior to becoming vegan, I didn't cook (other than some basics). I learned to cook with Veganomnicon and Vegan with a Vengence. I've found both quite easy to use, and in fact I had most ingrediants already in the kitchen, and the 'specialty' foods are pretty easy to find around here. I'm pretty quick with prep time, and frankly I actually cook maybe 3 times a week (too busy with work, and now heading back to school with after a year off while working, I'm sure I'm going to be sticking to my tried and trued recipes). Maybe someday I'll try La Dolce Vegan again, but week after week for 7 months I haven't found anything I want to make enough, I doubt it will happen anytime soon.
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#22 Old 06-24-2008, 11:04 AM
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Originally Posted by Veggily View Post


Depends on the definition you happen to be using for "vegan". (Also, vegans are vegetarian.)



I hear you. I try to be careful to say that I am a vegetarian who eats a "vegan-style" diet, out of respect for real vegans who eschew ALL animal products, not just food ones.



My beef (so to speak ) with inaccurate labels is that I keep buying (or borrowing from the library) so-called vegetarian cookbooks only to find that 90% of the recipes call for eggs, milk and cheese. It is as if the authors assume that all vegetarians are ovo-lacto...
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#23 Old 06-24-2008, 11:33 AM
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I don't eat eggs or drink milk. But if there's milk or egg products in some trace amount I don't freak out.
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#24 Old 06-24-2008, 11:36 AM
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Originally Posted by Diana View Post

cheese has a substance in it (caseine) that is addictive. Once your body has weaned itself from this addiction, you'll be fine. Right now you're a caseine addict, just like a heroine addict is addicted to heroine.



That is a very serious claim. Like heroin! Has anyone seen a scientific study that showed this? I haven't been able to find any. The only thing I can find is articles and blogs, with no science referenced. I would like to know more.

Beanitarian.
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#25 Old 06-24-2008, 11:44 AM
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That is a very serious claim. Like heroin! Has anyone seen a scientific study that showed this? I haven't been able to find any. The only thing I can find is articles and blogs, with no science referenced. I would like to know more.



Cheese is mildly addictive, the same way chocolate is mildly addictive.



The Daily Telegraph has an article about how both cheese and chocolate produce opiate-like substances in the brain.
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#26 Old 06-24-2008, 11:57 AM
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I find if you ask online, it sounds like most vegetarians don't. In the real world, every vegetarian I know does. Interesting, isn't it?



Good luck with your transition.

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#27 Old 06-24-2008, 12:37 PM
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I find if you ask online, it sounds like most vegetarians don't. In the real world, every vegetarian I know does. Interesting, isn't it?



Good luck with your transition.



I noticed that, too. All of the vegetarians that I know IRL eat things like cheese pizza, scrambled eggs, and pasta with cheese sauce daily. It's not ignorance, either, because the vegetarians I've talked to IRL know all about milk and egg production. It's always been a little weird to me that vegetarians online are very minimal lacto-ovo.



BTW, I eat eggs and dairy too.
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#28 Old 06-24-2008, 01:59 PM
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Originally Posted by broccolichick View Post

Cheese is mildly addictive, the same way chocolate is mildly addictive.



The Daily Telegraph has an article about how both cheese and chocolate produce opiate-like substances in the brain.



Thanks for posting that. I found a 2003 article. It says exactly what you said.



As an addiction specialist, I see nothing in that article that comes close to cheese being addictive in the sense that heroin is addictive. Our bodies naturally produce opiate-like substances in small quantities; that is not comparable to consuming opiates. Our bodies produce these substances in response to a variety of experiences, including pain and stress.



Sorry whoever posted that originally. I'm not trying to be nitpicky. It's just really easy for facts like this to get misunderstood.

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#29 Old 06-24-2008, 03:38 PM
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The easiest way to see the addictive properties of cheese:



stop eating it for a month.
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#30 Old 06-24-2008, 05:38 PM
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I used to eat cheese at least twice per day. I gave it up overnight and never looked back. No "withdrawal symptoms". Lots of foods cause you to release certain brain chemicals that give you a feeling of satisfaction; that doesn't mean you'll have to check into rehab if you stop eating them! It is nothing like the effects of heroin addiction. As someone who's seen several people coming off of that drug, trust me. The notion is ridiculous. Just give it up and don't look back. It's not hard to do(especially when you know the vast harm it causes)...you simply make the decision to stop buying it and to eat other things. And then you do just that; One foot in front of the other.
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