Semi vegetarian - VeggieBoards
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#1 Old 07-09-2007, 10:18 AM
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Hello. I've decided to become a semi vegetarian (not sure of the proper name). I don't want to cut out meat completely, but I want to introduce a lot more vegetarian recipes into my diet. I'd like to be 60% veg and 40% meat eater. I'm building my collection of vegetarian recipes, so far I have one. lol



I do have a question. I'm going to ween soy milk into my diet. I'm so used to cow milk, I think it'll take a while for my taste buds to get used to it. I started looking around the web and I've read it's not really good for you. I'm just a bit lost with the whole debate. Is soy milk good really for you?
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#2 Old 07-09-2007, 10:25 AM
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Like anything else, consume soy in moderation. There is evidence both to health benefits and health dangers with soy, but the consensus so far seems to be that moderate soy intake is not harmful and carries some benefits. If you're concerned about soy, try experimenting with rice milk and almond milk. There are other non-soy "dairy" products to try, too, made from things like oats and potatoes. Check your local health food store or a place like Trader Joe's or Whole Foods (in the States) or Planet Organic (in Canada).



This is a board for vegetarians, but we've welcomed semi-vegetarians and pescatarians in th past, so long as they focus on cutting out meat and don't antagonize anyone. That means keeping your posts focused on the non-meat aspect of your diet. That's my unofficial poster take on things; a moderator will probably be by sooner or later to clarify.



Welcome to VB! If you have any more questions, just ask!
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#3 Old 07-09-2007, 10:28 AM
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Originally Posted by Medesha View Post

Like anything else, consume soy in moderation. There is evidence both to health benefits and health dangers with soy, but the consensus so far seems to be that moderate soy intake is not harmful and carries some benefits. If you're concerned about soy, try experimenting with rice milk and almond milk. There are other non-soy "dairy" products to try, too, made from things like oats and potatoes. Check your local health food store or a place like Trader Joe's or Whole Foods (in the States) or Planet Organic (in Canada).



This is a board for vegetarians, but we've welcomed semi-vegetarians and pescatarians in th past, so long as they focus on cutting out meat and don't antagonize anyone. That means keeping your posts focused on the non-meat aspect of your diet. That's my unofficial poster take on things; a moderator will probably be by sooner or later to clarify.



Welcome to VB! If you have any more questions, just ask!



I don't plan on going on about meat, that would be a bit rude. I just want some advice on introducing more vegetarian recipes into my diet. Stuff like what's out there, how hard it is, that sort of thing. Not so concerned about soy, more confused with all of the conflicting advice I see.
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#4 Old 07-09-2007, 10:29 AM
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It's not bad for you. If you're drinking a bunch of sugary soy milk, it's not that good for you - but that's because of the sugar content, not the soy content.



Soy milk is just fine. The sites saying soy will give you cancer or man-boobs or whatever else aren't scientifically sound and are based on questionable "studies".
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#5 Old 07-09-2007, 10:33 AM
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If you want to introduce more vegetarian recipes into your diet, I highly recommend these cookbooks:



The New Not Strictly Vegetarian Cookbook

The Healthy Kitchen



The Healthy Kitchen is a little more 'advanced' so if you're just starting to cook, I would recommend the first one (it was my first ever cookbook and I use it to this day, 11 years after buying it).



The 2nd book iirc uses only fish & chicken meats, but almost all of the recipes can have the meat omitted or use tofu or tempeh or other proteins. Weil uses fresh, healthy ingredients and everything I've made from that book has turned out delicious.
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#6 Old 07-09-2007, 11:58 AM
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Originally Posted by solodanceparty View Post

Hello. I've decided to become a semi vegetarian (not sure of the proper name). I don't want to cut out meat completely, but I want to introduce a lot more vegetarian recipes into my diet. I'd like to be 60% veg and 40% meat eater.



I think what that's called is an omnivore who is trying to eat healthier.

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#7 Old 07-09-2007, 01:09 PM
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Welcome. I started out much like you are. It took me a little while to build my recipe collection and it was easier on the family to ease into it. I will say, once I got started, it only took me a couple of weeks to ditch the meat totally. I felt better physically on "veggie days" and mentally because I realised that why should I be harming animals when there are such wonderful veggie things to make. I've always be a proponent of baby steps. Good for you for starting your journey.



Re: soy milk. I didn't care for it and am on the fence about how much soy should be in the diet. I like rice milk much better. I started with the vanilla just for my cereal, but have recently started buying the regular rice milk. Even my kids like it.
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#8 Old 07-09-2007, 01:19 PM
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Welcome and congrats on wanting to go 60/40!



The best way to incorporate more veg*n (vegan/vegetarian) recipes is to read the recipe section here to see what looks good. Another good way is to let us know what you like to eat and let's see if we can veg*nise it for you (let us know what country you're in so we can recommend products, too). A good many dishes can already be converted by simply taking out the meat but others have to have a bit more rework to them. Fortunately, the rework isn't *that* difficult unless you're baking (but there's ways around that, too ).



Re: soymilk - many here like it, many here don't. There's also a few around here that like other milks, too such as almond, rice, oat, etc. There's a few threads around on which types/brands people prefer so read those threads for ideas. For straight up drinking, I prefer anything chocolate. For cooking, I've heard that rice is pretty good but I don't know for sure (I don't cook with milk).



Best of luck to you and don't be afraid to ask questions - we do love to help around here.
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#9 Old 07-09-2007, 01:26 PM
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Drinking soy milk won't harm you if your iodine intake is adequate and you're not relying on it as your sole source of nutrition (to state the obvious). Of course, you can try different kinds of plant milk. Oat milk and oat cream might actually be a less obtrusive choice if you're cooking something without a whole lot of seasonings. I'm not sure you can foam it though - soy milk turns into foam if you pour a little in a narrow jar and shake for a few seconds. If you're just after a creamy sauce, you can blend some cashews with a little water.



Quote:
Originally Posted by sleepydvdr View Post

This is just a shot in the dark (no idea if this is true), but meat and dairy companies could be funding research projects and websites to host claims that soy / soymilk is bad. Probably not what's going on, but I never discount the possibility. I have heard of a lot of things like this that happen in the business world.



If you take a look at the actual peer-reviewed literature, you won't find much in the way of the supposed dangers of soy at all, regardless of the source of funding.
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#10 Old 07-09-2007, 01:43 PM
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Omnivoire, not semi-anything.



Consider eliminating meat and milk from your diet completely.
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#11 Old 07-09-2007, 01:43 PM
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Originally Posted by solodanceparty View Post

I don't plan on going on about meat, that would be a bit rude. I just want some advice on introducing more vegetarian recipes into my diet. Stuff like what's out there, how hard it is, that sort of thing. Not so concerned about soy, more confused with all of the conflicting advice I see.



Hi!



It sounds like you are where I once was on my journey! For vegetarian recipes there are pasta choices with olive, mushrooms, garlic, and zucchini (this has been a big hit since I made this recipe.) Actually there are lots of pasta recipes that can be made without meat. For rice dishes, there are lots of ethnic dishes to make like chinese, thai and other asian foods as well as some india type dishes too. Yesterday, I went to Kwans here in Salem Oregon and we ordered all vegetarian dishes! ie veggie spring rolls, deep fried breaded mushrooms and dipping sauce, veggie fried rice, veggie wonton soup, veggie stirfry in garlic sauce over rice. Yummy!



Oh and there are soup options to like italian gazpacho, tomato basil soup, minestrone, vegetable soup, italian bean soup, etc.



If you would like a supporter on your journey, feel free to contact me on my yahoo or myspace listed in my profile.



Cheers!



JOY
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#12 Old 07-09-2007, 03:38 PM
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Originally Posted by solodanceparty View Post

Hello. I've decided to become a semi vegetarian (not sure of the proper name).

Semi-vegetarians are sometimes known as Flexitarians. Although most flexitarians eat a nearly vegetarian diet, with meat being only a small part of their diet.



Your average omnivore eats more than 60% vegetarian afterall, just look at the Food Pyramid where meat should be only 10 to 15% of your daily intake.



As for soy milk, yes it's better for you than regular milk, however it's an aquired taste. Start out by trying Chocolate Soy Milk from the refridgerator section, and if you start liking that then you can branch out and try other flavors. It took me a while to build up to liking regular plain soy milk.
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#13 Old 07-09-2007, 03:50 PM
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The BIG SOY DEBATE makes my head spin, too! I second what everyone else said, just don't overdo it!



I love soymilk and drink it everyday. My favorite brand is Organic Valley Plain soymilk, I love the taste and mouth feel of that one, it's thick and creamy. Other people swear by Silk brand. It's funny, I first became vegan 8 years ago, which only lasted for a short time (I'm back to vegan now). But ever since then I just can't stand the taste of milk! Even as a meat-eater, or lacto-ovo vegetarian, I have drank soymilk for taste purposes!



As far as healthy vegetarian food, I can suggest some really great cookbooks:



The Mediterranean Vegan Kitchen by Donna Klein

Vive Le Vegan and The Everyday Vegan by Dreena Burton

Vegan Planet by Robin Robertson



Have fun!

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#14 Old 07-09-2007, 06:19 PM
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Originally Posted by sleepydvdr View Post


This is just a shot in the dark (no idea if this is true), but meat and dairy companies could be funding research projects and websites to host claims that soy / soymilk is bad. Probably not what's going on, but I never discount the possibility.



Don't kid yourself. The same people who claim red meat is necessary for iron and milk builds strong bones ARE very high-powered and have resources to fund a great deal of "research" and advertising to discount the benefits of soy!





Also, what OregonAmy said...
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#15 Old 07-09-2007, 06:20 PM
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No shot in the dark there.
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#16 Old 07-09-2007, 06:24 PM
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Originally Posted by solodanceparty View Post

Hello. I've decided to become a semi vegetarian (not sure of the proper name). I don't want to cut out meat completely, but I want to introduce a lot more vegetarian recipes into my diet. I'd like to be 60% veg and 40% meat eater. I'm building my collection of vegetarian recipes, so far I have one. lol



I do have a question. I'm going to ween soy milk into my diet. I'm so used to cow milk, I think it'll take a while for my taste buds to get used to it. I started looking around the web and I've read it's not really good for you. I'm just a bit lost with the whole debate. Is soy milk good really for you?



By the way, congratulations on reducing meat! <--- These guys would like to join your party at the dinner table.



Cow's milk has a lot of saturated fat, and there are good vegetable sources of calcium, such as dark green vegetables and sesame seeds. Cutting milk from your diet is a healthy move to make.
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#17 Old 07-09-2007, 07:01 PM
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Originally Posted by solodanceparty View Post

Hello. I've decided to become a semi vegetarian (not sure of the proper name). I don't want to cut out meat completely, but I want to introduce a lot more vegetarian recipes into my diet. I'd like to be 60% veg and 40% meat eater. I'm building my collection of vegetarian recipes, so far I have one. lol



I do have a question. I'm going to ween soy milk into my diet. I'm so used to cow milk, I think it'll take a while for my taste buds to get used to it. I started looking around the web and I've read it's not really good for you. I'm just a bit lost with the whole debate. Is soy milk good really for you?

Well, considering Casein (glue protein in milk) promotes cancer growth not to mention milk can cause diabetes and osteoporosis, your best bet is to stick with soy!



Also I'm just putting this out there but you obviously aren't doing this for ethical reasons (or else you would cut all meat out) but for those that do, don't buy Silk. It is owned by Deans which is one of the largest dairy producers in the US!

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#18 Old 07-09-2007, 07:20 PM
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Originally Posted by Doktormartini View Post

your best bet is to stick with soy!

Or rice milk, almond milk, oat milk, hazlenut milk, hemp milk, cashew milk, or sesame seed milk....

Quote:
Also I'm just putting this out there but you obviously aren't doing this for ethical reasons (or else you would cut all meat out) but for those that do, don't buy Silk. It is owned by Deans which is one of the largest dairy producers in the US



Actually milk may cause more suffering than meat production.



And unfortunately most companies that make vegan products are owned by larger corporations that also support meat, dairy or other products. You can't get totally away from it unless you make your own, and even then, the farmers that grow and supply raw nuts, grains and beans are many times owned by companies that also own dairy and beef farms...



Just do the best you can.
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#19 Old 07-09-2007, 07:35 PM
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I think if my omni hubby or son ate 40 percent of their food as meat, I'd have them on a detox. even if you think in terms of : grain-veg - fruit-flesh, you are looking at 33 to 25 percent of a diet being flesh.



Sounds like you need to look at increasing the portion size of the veggies and shrink the flesh.



now, you might have meant identified meals: 60 percent all veggie, and that's a good starting point.



I had a copy of Lisa Tracey's Gradual Vegetarian. perhaps it would be of use to you.
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#20 Old 07-09-2007, 08:23 PM
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Or rice milk, almond milk, oat milk, hazlenut milk, hemp milk, cashew milk, or sesame seed milk....

Yeah, I forgot to mention these! Thanks!!!

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#21 Old 07-10-2007, 03:56 AM
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If you want to introduce more vegetarian recipes into your diet, I highly recommend these cookbooks:



The New Not Strictly Vegetarian Cookbook

The Healthy Kitchen



The Healthy Kitchen is a little more 'advanced' so if you're just starting to cook, I would recommend the first one (it was my first ever cookbook and I use it to this day, 11 years after buying it).



The 2nd book iirc uses only fish & chicken meats, but almost all of the recipes can have the meat omitted or use tofu or tempeh or other proteins. Weil uses fresh, healthy ingredients and everything I've made from that book has turned out delicious.





Thanks so much!
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#22 Old 07-10-2007, 04:00 AM
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Originally Posted by froggythefrog View Post

By the way, congratulations on reducing meat! <--- These guys would like to join your party at the dinner table.



Cow's milk has a lot of saturated fat, and there are good vegetable sources of calcium, such as dark green vegetables and sesame seeds. Cutting milk from your diet is a healthy move to make.



Thanks for the kind welcome!



When my husband came home, he grabbed the soymilk and tried it. He liked it! I was quite chuffed. He asked, "Why should I drink soy instead of cow milk?" and to be honest I didn't know what to say, so we had a look at the side of the cartons. We were both a bit shocked that out of the 1.7 grams of fat 1 of those was saturated. But the soy it was next to nothing. So that answered his question!
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#23 Old 07-10-2007, 04:01 AM
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Originally Posted by luvnsmartbeauty View Post

Hi!



It sounds like you are where I once was on my journey! For vegetarian recipes there are pasta choices with olive, mushrooms, garlic, and zucchini (this has been a big hit since I made this recipe.) Actually there are lots of pasta recipes that can be made without meat. For rice dishes, there are lots of ethnic dishes to make like chinese, thai and other asian foods as well as some india type dishes too. Yesterday, I went to Kwans here in Salem Oregon and we ordered all vegetarian dishes! ie veggie spring rolls, deep fried breaded mushrooms and dipping sauce, veggie fried rice, veggie wonton soup, veggie stirfry in garlic sauce over rice. Yummy!



Oh and there are soup options to like italian gazpacho, tomato basil soup, minestrone, vegetable soup, italian bean soup, etc.



If you would like a supporter on your journey, feel free to contact me on my yahoo or myspace listed in my profile.



Cheers!



JOY



Thanks! It's very kind of you.
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#24 Old 07-10-2007, 04:03 AM
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Originally Posted by Sketchy View Post

Omnivoire, not semi-anything.



Consider eliminating meat and milk from your diet completely.



Like I said in another reply, getting rid of cow milk will be easy, since my husband and I are actually liking the soy. I think it's certain meat items that will be difficult. I want to start off slow.
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#25 Old 07-10-2007, 04:06 AM
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I think what that's called is an omnivore who is trying to eat healthier.



Fair enough. Although, it would be nice for people to be supportive instead of snarky. You never know, I may cut out meat completely, but I don't know anything about vegetarianism, so I'm not the type to jump in head first.



There have been some really nice people, too bad you aren't one of them.
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#26 Old 07-10-2007, 05:49 AM
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It's cool that you're reducing your animal product consumption, but please note that a semi-vegetarian does not exist. A person who eats meat is an omnivore, even if it only makes up half a percent of their diet.



Also I agree with a previous poster that 40% meat in your diet is extremely high. I suppose you live in the States where meat makes up a majority of people's diet? Where I live, in Switzerland, a 40% meat diet would be looked at pretty odd, even by an omnivore's standards.



Reducing animal products in one's diet is good for your health, for the animals and for the environment. The more you reduce, the better!!! Keep up the good work.
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#27 Old 07-10-2007, 08:01 AM
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solodanceparty - Once you stop and look at what you eat, it's amazing what can be made vegetarian - a veggie lasagna, or spaghetti with just marinara. You'll find different sandwich fillings etc., too. Order a pizza with veggies only. There are a lot of options.



If you're looking to keep fish in your diet (at least for now) and cut out dairy, you might also like Marilu Henner's cookbooks. Healthy Life Kitchen is one of my favorites, and though Party Hearty has too many meat recipes for me, you might like it.



Please understand that while you have been open to vegetarianism and new ways of eating, we do get people in here who argue that vegetarians eat fish (or chicken) or who think we're all a bit (or more than a bit) crazy. We also routinely run into those in our own lives and with our own families. Fewer killed/harmed animals is a good thing. We're glad you're eating less meat. But for every semi-vegetarian who eats meat at a cook-out, there's an omni who thinks this means that all vegetarians eat chicken/fish. So we've become rather picky about labels.
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#28 Old 07-10-2007, 03:53 PM
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Originally Posted by solodanceparty View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by rabid_child View Post


I think what that's called is an omnivore who is trying to eat healthier.

There have been some really nice people, too bad you aren't one of them.



O.M.G! Sensitive much?



If you happened to spend time on these boards ANYWHERE besides your own private little thread, you might have noticed that rabid_child is one of the nicest people around these parts!



She was being straightforward, there's nothing wrong with that - it was honest. Too bad YOU can't handle it.



Oh, and evidently it went straight over your head that plenty of people answered your little thread in a much "snarkier" tone.
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#29 Old 07-10-2007, 04:35 PM
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Rabid_Child and Diana are correct in that there are no such thing as semi-vegetarians, but congratulations anyway on your desire to eat healthier. I'm certain that you and your family will soon feel the benefits of your dietary changes. I wish you the best of luck on your journey, and I highly recommend that you read the book "Food Revolution" by John Robbins.
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#30 Old 07-10-2007, 06:17 PM
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In the world, a majority of people are "lactose intolerant" because after you are done breast feeding, the body become lactase deficient so you cannot readily accept lactose in milk. Otherwise you'd still have urges to breast feed and such.



If your ancestors are from northern Europe or certain other regions in the world you are more lactose tolerant because that is largely where people consumed dairy, in other parts of the world significantly less or none is consumed. In China and regions around there they don't drink cow milk for breakfast, it is more typical to drink soy milk.



If you don't like soy you can drink other milks. Almond is pretty good. The big issue I see is that the processed food industry in the West uses a lot of filler and soy is found in everything so your body may get too much from all these sources. I looked around my cabinets and in Reeses Peanut Butter Cups, Nature Valley granola bars, airplane peanuts, Kashi granola bars, Pepperidge Farm cookies, dinner rolls all had soy in them. McDonalds and Burger King have soy in the hamburger buns. You get too much exposure which doesn't sound good to me, but it's cheap and makes the companies money I guess. So just watch what you eat.
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