I feel sick and need help - VeggieBoards
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#1 Old 05-16-2007, 06:25 PM
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I only a week ago stopped eating meat and am new to all of this. I have only realized the ugliness of what I was doing recently. I am starting to feel sick and don't think I am eating good. This is probably because I don't know what to eat. I mostly have lived off cereal, yogurt, and a great big bag of carrots.



I do not know what I am supposed to be eating and I have even stopped eating cereal at the moment until I can find out more as to why some don't drink milk. I do not know what I should be eating and every time I turn left or right there is something new I find that I have been eating that I no longer desire.



I do not have anyone where I live to talk to and therefore do not know what I should be doing. It seems like I just dropped being ignorant all of a sudden and there is a lot of negative things I see that I do not like.



Can someone tell me what my eating habits should be? I am a 17 year old male of average weight. Also, why is it that some don't drink milk. I thought no animal was harmed in the process of milking, I am confused .



EDIT: Btw, hope posted in correct place. This forum is to big .

The recipe for perpetual ignorance is: be satisfied with your opinions and content with your knowledge. -Elbert Hubbard
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#2 Old 05-16-2007, 07:31 PM
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Welcome to VB! You need to be doing massive amounts of research right now. Variety is key here. Fruits, vegetables, whole grains, nuts, beans. If you don't want to go vegan right now, fine. It's probably better if you transition yourself slowly after doing more research. Google vegetarian diets or find the nearest library.



You musn't choose just a few foods to "live off." In order to thrive you need to include many different colors and textures from each food group. I'm sure others on this board will have loads of great advice for you, but it is imperative that you get some variety into your diet and do not limit yourself to three or four foods.



(ETA: If you still want to eat cereal without consuming cow's milk, milk substitutes are excellent. I like Silk Soymilk and Rice Dream. They can be found right in the dairy aisle. They are also fortified with very important vitamins and minerals.)
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#3 Old 05-16-2007, 07:45 PM
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I have to agree with CatLadyVT. You should do a lot of research, go to you local library and look up any vegan recipe books, also nutrition books.



Variety is pretty essential.



As for reasons against milk, you could start here: (assuming it's for ethical reasons)

http://www.vegansociety.com/html/ani.../dairy_cow.php



There's milk alternatives, rice milk, soy milk, almond milk, potato milk, etc. There seem to be these alternatives in many stores now days.

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#4 Old 05-16-2007, 08:16 PM
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I am not expecting to not make mistakes but I am trying where I can. However, there are a few things I can not do.



My school does not have a library and I am not allowed at the city's (don't ask , it was nothing bad).



As for thing's like milk. I do not like what I read of how it is gotten but I don't realistically think I can drop it until I am on my own. As far as I know, I think the other milk types are expensive in comparison and I am 17 and can not buy my own items (jobless and I have to assist around home a lot so I can not get a job). On top of that, we are not a family fortunate in money.



As for researching on the net. I don't know where to begin. I am mostly looking for a non meat list of what I CAN eat and what I MUST eat to get what I need to keep on going. I don't know what websites are outdated, what ones are reliable in good info, and what ones offer not overly expensive options. On top of that I did find a meal plan but realized after reading a bit that I was on a site for teenage girls and so I left as I am sure a male and females amount of needed food would probably be different.

The recipe for perpetual ignorance is: be satisfied with your opinions and content with your knowledge. -Elbert Hubbard
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#5 Old 05-16-2007, 08:25 PM
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I just have to say, it is really sad that your school doesn't have a library. Now, go to google.com and type in vegetarian nutrition or vegetarian diet. If you are concerned that you are not equipped to do adequate research on your own, see your doctor for nutrition advice.



You must have foods from each food group to be healthy: protein, veggies, fruits, grains, healthy fats. Giving up dairy is not a must right now. It is a nice goal for the future, but right now you need to concentrate on getting your nutrients. I said this before and I will say it again: Veggies, fruits, grains (whole grain breads, rice, pasta, cereals), nuts, beans, dairy or dairy substitutes. Eat as many different colors as you can.



It would be helpful, if you can, to talk to your family about your concerns. They may be supportive and try to help you out. They may even consider making some changes to their eating habits as well. Good luck, and please be careful with your health.



P.S. Eating vegetarian doesn't have to be expensive. In fact, look at the meat prices. Vegetarians eat basically everything meat eaters eat, minus the meat. Vegans are more restrictive but it doesn't sound like you are quite ready for that yet.
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#6 Old 05-16-2007, 08:31 PM
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Hi Jacob



Well you have to decide your self on the level of veg/an you want to start of they range from lacto/ ovo to vegan in here ...all are welcome



The advice was spot on in the previous post . Maybe you could visit the recipe sections to get a couple of basic recipes that have a good balance , are easy to cook and then work from there .



If you need some advice as you work through it all ...just post someone will reply
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#7 Old 05-16-2007, 08:32 PM
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#8 Old 05-16-2007, 08:54 PM
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Thanks a lot everyone. I am going to try and work this with the advice given and be active on the forums. I will also talk with my doctor just in case. Thanks again, I will keep it updated here if I run into some trouble.



Now. Time for meh to learnz me a recipe!

The recipe for perpetual ignorance is: be satisfied with your opinions and content with your knowledge. -Elbert Hubbard
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#9 Old 05-16-2007, 09:43 PM
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PS ...there is also a Teen section on the boards
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#10 Old 05-17-2007, 06:48 AM
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Here are some ideas on things to eat, as part of a ovo-lacto vegetarian diet (that is, as someone who eats dairy products and eggs). This might help get you started:



Breakfast ideas:

toast/bagel/muffin with cream cheese/peanut butter/butter and jam

cereal with fruit and milk (either cow's/soy/almond/rice)

soy sausages or bacon

scrambled eggs or scrambled tofu

omlet with veggies (cheese optional)



Lunch/dinner:

sandwiches - Peanut butter and jelly is vegetarian, have a cheese sandwich, try some of the soy deli meats (you can even find them at WalMart), hummus (a chickpea spread) with veggies

veggie pizza

substitute refried beans for meat in something at Taco Bell

pasta with meat-free sauce (a bunch of brands have meat-free sauces)

cheese ravioli with meat-free tomato sauce

veggie egg rolls or spring rolls

a stir fry with tofu instead of meat

salad (of course)

fruit

a variety of vegetables

macaroni and cheese (regular Kraft boxed mac and cheese isn't vegetarian, but their organic boxed mac and cheese is)



And keep in mind that most desserts are also vegetarian (though not necessarily vegan) - cookies, cakes, ice cream. Most chips are, too. It IS possible to be a junk-food vegetarian. I don't encourage that, though.



A hidden animal ingredient that you can usually eliminate just by reading labels is Gelatin. Some yogurts, chip dips and marshmallows have gelatin in them. If you start getting in the habit of reading labels, you'll be well on your way.



I hope those ideas get you started. If you can buy yourself a copy of "Becoming Vegetarian", that will help a lot in giving you the nutritional and practical information you need.
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#11 Old 05-17-2007, 07:26 AM
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There are different types of vegetarianism. Many vegetarians are Lacto-Ovo, meaning they eat milk and eggs, but no red meat, poultry, fish, sea life, and the biproducts of that like broth and lard.

Vegans do not consume any animal products, including milk, eggs, and honey.



There are a lot of every day foods that are vegetarian. You can still eat things like cheese pizza (or pizza with veggies! even better), macaroni and cheese, pasta with marinara sauce, many soups like minestrone and tomato. At our house we regularly make fajitas with bell pepper strips, zucchini, and some sort of meat substitute, like morningstar farms steak strips, or homemade seitan. Portabello mushroom works great there too! You can make tacos or sloppy joes with burger crumbles, lentils, or small beans in place of the ground meat. Don't think of vegetarianism of eliminating a lot of foods from your diet -- but learning to eat a lot more foods and broadening your horizons!



Are you allowed to walk into the library? You could always sit and read books there and just not check them out. There are a few "what did you eat today" threads around here as well that should give you an idea of what vegetarians eat!

http://megatarian.blogspot.com
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#12 Old 05-17-2007, 07:52 AM
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You're probably not eating enough calories or too many calories from carbohydrates at the moment. Try getting some more fat and protein in if you can, even if you just start with peanut butter.



If money is an issue, look up some recipes that use lentils and beans. Hummus or vegetarian chili can be dead cheap if made from scratch and they'll actually fill you up. For hummus, all you need to do is throw a can of chickpeas in a blender with lemon juice, oil, garlic, salt, paprika or chilli powder and cumin and sesame butter if you can find them. Makes a good spread for a sandwich with roasted eggplant and zucchini.



You don't need milk subs to eat cereal. I ate mine plain for years before upgrading to soy yoghurt, but I know people who pour on a bit of juice. Try calcium fortified OJ if you have any floating around the house. That said, a carton of soy milk can last me over a week - 89 cents (cheapest brand that's available here) a week isn't too bad.
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#13 Old 05-17-2007, 08:57 AM
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If you are able to save up some $$$, (maybe by doing some extra chores, or some people's yard work), I would highly recommend picking up a book suck as 'Becoming Vegetarian' By Brenda Davis and Vesanto Melina - or even 'Vegetarian for Dummies'.



The internet is a great resource, but it is really nice to have something portable, in book form that you can take with you when you go out, or even to read in the comfort of your bedroom.



Becoming Vegetarian was practically my bible for the first 6 months after I went veg.



Also, please check out the 'tip of the day thread'- there is tons of really great information there.



Another good reasource is goveg.com





Good luck- and use this opportunity to try lots of wonderful new foods. It's more fun than it sounds... Really!

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#14 Old 05-17-2007, 01:31 PM
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If you are concerned about cruelty to animals, you should no longer be eating commercial dairy or eggs. People think that because they don't kill the animal directly for these products, that they must be o.k. for animals, but that is not the case, given the ways they are produced.



Dairy: every calf is removed from his or her mother on the day of or within days of birth on a commercial dairy farm, so that humans can take the milk. This is so even on the "organic" and "free range" farms. The girls replace their mothers, the boys typically are made into veal or cheap meat, as there is no use for them on a dairy farm. If allowed to, a cow can live to about 25 years naturally; on a commercial farm a cow might live 3-4 years (or on a "good" farm 10 years at the very best) - she is so spent from the yearly forced preganancies and births, and no longer useful to the farmer. Gestation is 9 months so a cow is forced to be pregnant with one calf and giving milk from the previous one at the same time, in an endless cycle. Up to 80% of hamburger meat is made up of spent dairy cows.



The cruelest thing about dairy is the separation of mother from calf. This must happen by force, the calf literally being dragged away from the mother. The mother and calf may look for each other and cry for each other for months. The same hormones that bond a human mother to her baby are present in the mother cow, and the same drive to nurture and care for her baby. Ethically it's rather indefensible to consume dairy, especially as there are many other options for calcium and protein in the US.

http://www.factoryfarming.org/dairy.htm



Eggs: the vast majority of eggs are from battery farmed hens. They are kept in cages so cramped they can't even spread their wings. They receive no individual care in a system in which vast numbers of animals are farmed in order to maximize profits, it's about volume.



Countless investigations have shown hens with their heads caught in the bars of their cages (so they die of thirst and hunger), or hens who have fallen into the manure pits below, to again die of thirst and starvation. Or animals will have open sores and infections. At the end of their miserable lives they are trucked to a slaughterhouse, handled in an assembly-line process (particularly horrendous because at this point their bones are calcium-depleted, fragile, and easily broken), and killed, usually to become cheap meat/animal feed.

http://www.factoryfarming.org/eggs.htm



So-called "free range" may be no better. See: http://www.cok.net/lit/freerange.php



Even when people purchase their own hens in order to get the eggs (and assuming they don't kill them but keep them for life), the problem is that hens are sexed after birth. For every hen purchased, there is a male chick who was tossed in a grinder, the trash, or suffocated.



see:

http://www.factoryfarming.org/

http://www.whyvegan.com

http://www.meetyourmeat.com

"If you want to know where you would have stood on slavery before the civil war, don't look at where you stand on slavery today, look at where you stand on animal rights." - Paul Watson.

 

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#15 Old 05-17-2007, 01:45 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Irizary View Post

If you are concerned about cruelty to animals, you should no longer be eating commercial dairy or eggs. People think that because they don't kill the animal directly for these products, that they must be o.k. for animals, but that is not the case, given the ways they are produced.



This is true, but you should not try to give it all up at once. Be lacto/ovo for a little while (free range products are sometimes a little better but more costly) just see how that goes for you, and once you get the hang of it then you should think about veganism. It is a big change, it takes time and a little bit of experience to get used to it.



You can look for products like Morningstar Farms, Boca, and Amy's seem to be the most common. These are all meatless products that are easy to "cook"/microwave.
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#16 Old 05-17-2007, 02:58 PM
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I agree with everyone else. And this is why some people don't drink milk:



http://www.animalaid.org.uk/h/n/CAMP...anism/ALL/656/



Also, most cows are injected with hormones and drugs to make them produce abnormal amounts of milk- this is ending up in the stuff we drink.
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#17 Old 05-17-2007, 03:51 PM
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Hi, Jacob3. Welcome aboard!



If the library is off-limits to you, it will make finding information harder. Obviously you have internet access, but you'll want to be sure that your sources for nutrition are reliable.



I was ovo-lacto-vegetarian for a long time, but only started dropping eggs and milk about 10-15 years ago. In my experience, it's a lot harder if you're avoiding eggs and milk as well as meat and fish. Don't feel bad if you choose not to go vegan now- it sounds like you're taking on a lot of changes.



You mentioned you've been eating mostly cereal, yogurt, and carrots. Is that what you were eating besides meat and fish, until recently? If so, this could turn out to be good for you- you might be on the verge of improving your diet and finding a lot of other tasty things to eat, getting a lot more variety. What other things can you think of that you like?

Peasant (1963-1972) and Fluffy (1970s?-1982- I think of you as 'Ambrose' now)- Your spirits outshone some humans I have known. Be happy forever.
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#18 Old 05-17-2007, 06:34 PM
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If you really liked the vegetarian meal plan you found on the teenage girl website, you could always double or even triple the portions, or if that is too much food, increase them by half.
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#19 Old 05-18-2007, 01:46 AM
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Thanks everyone for your help. I think I got a grasp on it now. Besides, all my meals seem to taste better now. I have decided to go ovo-lacto-vegetarian untill I am bringing in my own cash flow and can afford to go further. I have discussed it with my parent and they agreed to buy certain items as long as I am willing to cook for the family as well (I got a laugh) and it is not over priced to what we normally buy. Of coarse meat will still be bought under my roof but on those nights I am going to manage on my own.



After several pms from nice people and several post replies I got down a stable list of ideas and have began fooling around with simple things in the snack section.



I thought I would need to limit myself by doing this but it seems that things have gotten better. I am now motivated to learn to cook and have found tons of ideas and nice people on this forum!



Thanks again! Looking to be here a good while.

The recipe for perpetual ignorance is: be satisfied with your opinions and content with your knowledge. -Elbert Hubbard
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#20 Old 05-18-2007, 05:46 AM
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That's wonderful! I am so happy for you. It's great to have a family who is willing to support your decisions. And it really is a lot of fun to experiment with new things. I hope you will stick around on the boards and let us know if you have anymore questions.
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#21 Old 05-18-2007, 05:57 AM
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That's great Jacob! I glad you were able to find support both with your family and here at VBs.

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#22 Old 05-19-2007, 03:15 PM
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Sometimes feeling sick is the release of toxins from the meat you were eating. Because of that, I had to gradually give up meat. Dairy products are unhealthy for you. They do give the cow tons of hormones (which you consume when you eat dairy) which causes them to give lots more milk than they normally would give. They are not treated like pets.



For a complete understanding of the healthiest foods to eat and why, see the site Healthy Foods. For example all animal foods have cholesterol and have no fiber-- none, zip, nada and zero. All plant foods have fiber and no cholesterol.
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#23 Old 05-19-2007, 04:34 PM
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I'm new to this too. I need to start looking at recipies.
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#24 Old 05-20-2007, 12:34 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sally429 View Post

This is true, but you should not try to give it all up at once. Be lacto/ovo for a little while (free range products are sometimes a little better but more costly) just see how that goes for you, and once you get the hang of it then you should think about veganism. It is a big change, it takes time and a little bit of experience to get used to it.





What? You're telling this poster, a person clearly concerned about animal cruelty in eggs and milk, what he "should" or should not do? A lot of people go from omnivore to vegan, because they care about animals, not how "easy" it is for them or not to stop harming animals, as their former purchases did.



I would encourage the OP to explore cruelty-free living. Just as you would not say, "Oh, I will harm humans for a while and see how I feel in a bit," it would be great for you to think of your actions, your purchases, and how they affect other lives, whether it be "free-range" (which means nothing) or not.



Good for you for looking into this!
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#25 Old 05-20-2007, 02:34 AM
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What? You're telling this poster,



Good for you for looking into this!



Penny ....Jacob has made his mind up what he wants to do whether he wants to go ovo/lacto or vegan or make vegan his goal its really non of our business . But to support him in the direction he is going . He has looked at all the info , talked it out with his family and worked it out from there ....I think thats great



I think Sally's advice was excellent , it was one way to work through the issues that Jacob was facing
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#26 Old 05-20-2007, 04:15 PM
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Depending on where you live, if there's a borders or barnes and noble around, what i do sometimes (ok, a lot of the time), is got and sit there and read through books, I take index cards and write down recipes and things like that in their cooking section. I've gotten stares, but nobody has stopped me yet! I"m vegan, and I eat everything in sight that doesn't have meat or animal byproducts. Basically, I like eating only ingredients I can pronounce. But I'm never short on being able to find something to eat. It realy does get easier over time. Some things are more expensive, but a lot of the things I eat are just around the house, fruits, vegetables, nuts, I love coconut milk, soy milk, etc. It really does get easier, to the point we hardly think about it anymore.
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#27 Old 05-27-2007, 07:07 AM
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Quote:
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I was on a site for teenage girls and so I left as I am sure a male and females amount of needed food would probably be different.



This is a good place to start, just eat more of it. Males have a higher metab. rate than females and you are growing faster at your present age than the girls your age. Until you can get better information, use that and increase the volumns of food. Until you are on your own or can talk Mom into Silk, go with the cow's milk for your nutrition's sake.



The act of milking doesn't hurt the cow, but sometimes they take the calves away at a very young age and kill them for their super tender meat. The other thing to know is milk has a minute amount of bad bacteria in it from infection in the cows. It is just a thought.
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