Veggies dont have enough nutrients?? - VeggieBoards
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#1 Old 03-31-2006, 07:46 PM
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As part of a mandatory meeting a work today we had a Dr. as a guest speaker who talked to us about stress and healthy lifestyles. He said that vegetables have relatively low nutritional value compared to what they used to because the soil they grow in has been depleted of nutrients. I do not take a multi vitamin because my diet is full of really really healthy stuff. But now he has me paranoid that maybe I should be. Can anyone help me???
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#2 Old 03-31-2006, 08:09 PM
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I keep reading this again and again. Explanations I've been given include that commercial fertilizers tend to bind to nutrients that would normally absorb into plants and keep those nutrients in the soil, and that soils are depleted of nutrients from overfarming. I suppose both of these are possibly true, and have lead me to take a multivitamin, despite having a reasonably healthy diet. Some sources I read this from had a vitamin supplement to sell ("Body For Life"), and others like "The Optimum Nutrition Bible" had not mentioned one as far as I read. The only thing I really know is that if you overfarm, you will deplete soil eventually, so it's a possibility. Without knowing a specific farm's practices and examining nutrient value in a lab, I don't think there's a way to really know.
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#3 Old 04-01-2006, 12:33 AM
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Eat organic. Seriously.



The reason? It used to be that farmers had to really cultivate the soil with lots of nutrients and things to make their veggies grow. Organic farmers still have to do that.



Farmers that use chemicals and pesticides and herbicides and crazy fertilizers and GMO products no longer have to manage the nutrients in the soil so much. Their crops grow from all the chemicals. So those veggies have less nutrients.
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#4 Old 04-01-2006, 06:27 AM
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It is true that soils are depleted because of chemicals used in farming, lack of crop rotation, etc. The best is to buy organic and grow some of your own things such as sprouts and herbs and even a vegetable garden. If you feel the need for supplementation, get a whole food vegan multi vitamin.
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#5 Old 04-01-2006, 02:11 PM
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Go organic... that's all I can say. I love it!
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#6 Old 04-06-2006, 04:03 AM
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Either way they are still saying to eat your fruits and veggies, if you can go organic, if not take a vitamin to be sure.
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#7 Old 04-07-2006, 07:33 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OrangeClouds115 View Post

Eat organic. Seriously.



The reason? It used to be that farmers had to really cultivate the soil with lots of nutrients and things to make their veggies grow. Organic farmers still have to do that.



Farmers that use chemicals and pesticides and herbicides and crazy fertilizers and GMO products no longer have to manage the nutrients in the soil so much. Their crops grow from all the chemicals. So those veggies have less nutrients.

I was going to give you this advice, so I will just second it!
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#8 Old 04-07-2006, 07:38 PM
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Read the book Organic Inc by Samuel Fromartz for an explanation of how non-organic farming makes for less nutritous produce. This book just cam out and I haven't finished it yet, but so far, it's pretty good.
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#9 Old 04-08-2006, 02:27 PM
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Farmers also do not practice crop rotation as they did in earlier days (especially before WW2). Crop rotation puts back into the soil what the plants take out. Without this step, farmers have to rely on things like "crazy fertalizers" to try to replenish the soil properly.



I've also read about where those "crazy fertalizers" come from, but I don't have the book so I can't fully explain the story properly (I read it long ago and the details are fuzzy at best).
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#10 Old 04-10-2006, 09:58 PM
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I take a wide spectrum vitamin and mineral supplement and haven't had any problems health wise since becoming a vegetarian - plus I find that the fact that I'm taking a supplement helps to make my family and friends feel better about my being a vegetarian - they worry less about my health.
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#11 Old 04-11-2006, 08:57 AM
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biodynamic is a great alternative as well. some organic farmers do not 'rest' their fields, but many biodynamic ones do. this builds up the soil over a couple of years (they fertilize and such each year, but only grow in certain fields each year, rotating between fields). so, the soil is even more nutrient rich.
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#12 Old 04-11-2006, 09:54 PM
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Zoebird, you bring up a good point about biodynamic crop farming.



How would one locate a biodynamic farmer (especially if one were in the city and could barely get hold of a conventional farmer, let alone one that practiced any form of concious farming apart from the mainstream)?
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#13 Old 04-16-2006, 11:27 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by deb9017 View Post

As part of a mandatory meeting a work today we had a Dr. as a guest speaker who talked to us about stress and healthy lifestyles. He said that vegetables have relatively low nutritional value compared to what they used to because the soil they grow in has been depleted of nutrients. I do not take a multi vitamin because my diet is full of really really healthy stuff. But now he has me paranoid that maybe I should be. Can anyone help me???





I am born vegetarian, and I do not support the need of meat in any case.

I get all my nutrients and millions like me who are born vegetarians.
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#14 Old 04-17-2006, 12:18 AM
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When people say the soil is depleted, where do they think the supplements are coming from? Either depleted soil or a labarotory, in any case the nutrients are coming to you second-hand. So it doesn't make sense for them to say your plant food is inferior due to depleted soil and then try to convince you to use a supplement.



Say the soil was truly depleted - there are still far more nutrients in fresh plant food than animal food and cooked grains.



Be comforted to know that all the nutrients are in your plants - a plant cannot produce without the proper nutrients in the soil.
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#15 Old 03-22-2007, 02:11 PM
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Some myths have been stated here. I have had a large vegan veg garden for about 7 years and I have extensive experience along with lots of reading to see why my experience didn't coincide with things I was told.



Yes, conventionally cultivated vegetables may be lower in micronutrients than cultivated vegetables were in the past. Because soil has become depleted of all nutrient, macro and micro, and farmers put back the macro nutrients and don't do as good a job of putting back the micronutrients. Plants get "empty calories" the same way people do, when they eat white flour and white sugar, instead of whole cane juice and whole grain flour. They may or may not take a "vitamin pill" to compensate. Farmers may or may not do the same thing, by buying "micronutrient" products to put on their soil, along with the macronutrients they put on their soil.



However this is NOT a good argument for eating animal foods - because animals are fed these very same plants, and thus they don't have all the micronutrients we expect from them, either. All nutrients needed by humans (and other animals) are synthesized by either micro-organisms or green plants. The animals that people eat do not synthesize anything we need, that we can't get from plants. They simply pass on plant-produced nutrients to us, second hand. This is basic junior high school health or biology.



Feeding inadequate food plants to animals first, does not solve the problem of humans getting the nutrients they need. The only solution is to grow better food plants. Then either feed THOSE to us, or feed THOSE to animals and eat the animals.



The best thing to do for plants is to feed them "whole foods" such as decomposing plant matter. Decomposing seaweed is particularly high in mineral micronutrients. Tree leaves are also a good source of micronutrients because they bring up nutrients from down deep, so deep that humans haven't depleted the nutrients yet, at that depth.



Orange cloud says "Farmers that use chemicals and pesticides and herbicides and crazy fertilizers and GMO products no longer have to manage the nutrients in the soil so much.'



The "crazy fertilizers" that farmers use [I]are[I] nutrients. But they are not whole foods. They are like white sugar. Gentically engineered products do not help farmers avoid putting nutrients back in the soil. Gentically engineered plants may require higher levels of macronutrients and micronutrients, in order to have the high yield that they have expected of them.



4evergrounded "Crop rotation puts back into the soil what the plants take out." Uh, crop rotation is just different plants. What one plant takes out, the next plant may not need, or not need as much of. So it will grow. But eventually you are back to the first plant again. And none of the plants you grew put anything back into the soil, that they didn't take out first. So you end up with depleted soil - but not so soon as you would if you didn't rotate. There is really no fool-proof solution to the problem of micro-nutrient depletion. Even leaving the land fallow and tilling in the wild weeds that take over, does not solve the problem. It just delays it. To solve the problem you have to get input from ELSEWHERE. Trees and seaweed are 2 examples. From down deep, and from far away. But trees also just delay the depletion. Another is cultivated plants grown on better soil, and composted or tilled in to your depleted soil. Only seeweed and plants from other soil (or the soil itself) really counteracts depletion. Everything else I mentioned just delays it.



sharon "Be comforted to know that all the nutrients are in your plants - a plant cannot produce without the proper nutrients in the soil."



Plant nutrients, yes. Plants cannot produce without plant nutrients. But many of the nutrients that animals and humans traditionally have acquired from plants, are not needed by the plants themselves. Some are waste products of plant metabolism. Others are taken up by the roots and distributed by the vascular system thruout the plant, but simply are not needed by the plant for anything. An example is iodine. Plants do not need iodine. Too much will harm them. But if there are traces of iodine in the soil, plants will absorb them. Then humans can get iodine they need, as a micronutrient, from the plants. But the plants themselves would grow just as well without iodine. See this; find "iodine" on the page.
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