nut free, soy free, gluten free, dairy free, vegetarian...anyone? - VeggieBoards
Forum Jump: 
 3Likes
  • 1 Post By vegan4health
  • 1 Post By David3
  • 1 Post By Spudulika
 
Thread Tools
#1 Old 11-24-2016, 10:03 PM
Newbie
 
Join Date: Nov 2016
Posts: 6
nut free, soy free, gluten free, dairy free, vegetarian...anyone?

Hi there, I'm new here and this lifestyle is new to me as well. My doctor told me a week ago that I need to change my lifestyle and take my health seriously as I have fatty liver and multinodular goiter among other things. She recommended a holistic nutritionist who suggested a vegan lifestyle that is nut free, soy free, and gluten free.

From reading thru the forum last night, I found out that being a vegan is more a lifestyle than a diets. So I guess I will be a strict vegetarian.

Will be starting with a 2 day vegetable juice cleansing tomorrow then off I go.

Just wondering if anyone out there is following the same diet or living the same lifestyle? Would love to get some tips, recipes and maybe gain some friends?! All my friends and family loves to eat lots of meat and some vegetables so hope I can connect with people who lives the same lifestyle for encouragement, etc..

TIA!
AbirasDad likes this.
vegan4health is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
#2 Old 11-24-2016, 11:42 PM
Veggie Regular
 
jessandreia's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Location: ON, Canada
Posts: 1,616
Base your diet around beans, quinoa, lentils, vegetables, fruit, oats, rice and potatoes. There are gluten-free pastas if you feel like splurging a bit too.

Google is great to find recipes. Just type "gluten-free and soy-free vegan recipes".

"We have enslaved the rest of the animal creation, and have treated our distant cousins in fur and feathers so badly that beyond doubt, if they were able to formulate a religion, they would depict the Devil in human form." - William Ralphe Inge


Last edited by jessandreia; 11-24-2016 at 11:46 PM.
jessandreia is offline  
#3 Old 11-25-2016, 01:34 PM
Vegan since 1991
 
David3's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Posts: 3,634
Quote:
Originally Posted by vegan4health View Post
Hi there, I'm new here and this lifestyle is new to me as well. My doctor told me a week ago that I need to change my lifestyle and take my health seriously as I have fatty liver and multinodular goiter among other things. She recommended a holistic nutritionist who suggested a vegan lifestyle that is nut free, soy free, and gluten free.

From reading thru the forum last night, I found out that being a vegan is more a lifestyle than a diets. So I guess I will be a strict vegetarian.

Will be starting with a 2 day vegetable juice cleansing tomorrow then off I go.

Just wondering if anyone out there is following the same diet or living the same lifestyle? Would love to get some tips, recipes and maybe gain some friends?! All my friends and family loves to eat lots of meat and some vegetables so hope I can connect with people who lives the same lifestyle for encouragement, etc..

TIA!

Welcome to the forum, Vegan4Health!

I definitely agree that a low fat, whole foods, vegetarian diet is a great way to go. Congratulations on this beginning. Also, you've made a good choice in working with a nutrition professional.

It is now widely accepted that low fat, whole foods, vegetarian diets are effective for weight loss (at least by health professionals, if not by the general public). If your family has doubts about this, please show them these statements from mainstream, reputable health organizations:


The American Heart Association makes this statement regarding the health of vegetarians:

“Many studies have shown that vegetarians seem to have a lower risk of obesity, coronary heart disease (which causes heart attack), high blood pressure, diabetes mellitus and some forms of cancer.”
Link to this statement: http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/GettingHealthy/NutritionCenter/Vegetarian-Diets_UCM_306032_Article.jsp#




The American Diabetes Association makes this statement regarding vegetarian diets:

“A vegetarian diet is a healthy option, even if you have diabetes. Research supports that following this type of diet can help prevent and manage diabetes. In fact, research on vegan diets has found that carbohydrate restrictions were not necessary and still promoted weight loss and lowered participants' A1C”
Link to this statement: http://www.diabetes.org/food-and-fit...r-vegetarians/




Kaiser Permanente (one of the largest health insurance companies in the United States) makes the following statement regarding plant-based diets:

“Research shows that plant-based diets are cost-effective, low-risk interventions that may lower body mass index, blood pressure, HbA1C, and cholesterol levels. They may also reduce the number of medications needed to treat chronic diseases and lower ischemic heart disease mortality rates. Physicians should consider recommending a plant-based diet to all their patients, especially those with high blood pressure, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, or obesity.”
Link to this statement: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3662288/


Mainstream vegan organizations recommend a diet that include legumes (beans, lentils, and/or peas), whole grains, vegetables, fruit, and small amounts of fatty foods (nuts, seeds, and/or avocados). If you choose to avoid gluten, there are several other common grains available (oatmeal, brown rice, corn). If you choose to avoid soy and soymilk, then you might enjoy other types of calcium-fortified plant "milks" (rice milk, almond milk):

vegan4health likes this.

_________

Specific recommendations for a healthy diet include: eating more fruit, vegetables, legumes, nuts and grains; cutting down on salt, sugar and fats. It is also advisable to choose unsaturated fats, instead of saturated fats and towards the elimination of trans-fatty acids."
- United Nations' World Health Organization
http://www.who.int/topics/diet/en/

Last edited by David3; 11-25-2016 at 01:40 PM.
David3 is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
#4 Old 11-25-2016, 01:39 PM
Vegan since 1991
 
David3's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Posts: 3,634
Has the nutritionist supplied you with meal plans, in order to make your vegetarian transition easier?
.

_________

Specific recommendations for a healthy diet include: eating more fruit, vegetables, legumes, nuts and grains; cutting down on salt, sugar and fats. It is also advisable to choose unsaturated fats, instead of saturated fats and towards the elimination of trans-fatty acids."
- United Nations' World Health Organization
http://www.who.int/topics/diet/en/
David3 is offline  
#5 Old 11-26-2016, 03:39 AM
Veggie Regular
 
Spudulika's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: UK
Posts: 1,098
Quote:
Originally Posted by vegan4health View Post
She recommended a holistic nutritionist who suggested a vegan lifestyle that is nut free, soy free, and gluten free.
Hi there, just curious - did your nutritionist explain why no nuts, soya or gluten?
Sounds like it could be quite challenging to maintain.
vegan4health likes this.
Spudulika is offline  
#6 Old 11-28-2016, 01:20 AM
Newbie
 
Join Date: Nov 2016
Posts: 6
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spudulika View Post
Hi there, just curious - did your nutritionist explain why no nuts, soya or gluten?
Sounds like it could be quite challenging to maintain.
Hi, she said they are bad for my thyroid. Soya and gluten are bad for autoimmune disease.
vegan4health is offline  
#7 Old 11-28-2016, 01:27 AM
Newbie
 
Join Date: Nov 2016
Posts: 6
Quote:
Originally Posted by jessandreia View Post
Base your diet around beans, quinoa, lentils, vegetables, fruit, oats, rice and potatoes. There are gluten-free pastas if you feel like splurging a bit too.

Google is great to find recipes. Just type "gluten-free and soy-free vegan recipes".
Thanks for the suggestion! I've been googling like crazy and saving blogs. I guess I'm more overwhelmed with the transition. It's a whole different way of life entirely and changing habits as small as knowing exactly where to go if you need eggs or ketchup. Now I'm struggling to find condiments that are vegan, gluten free, soy free, and nut free. And if there are available alternatives, I'd have to go to different specialty stores. I'm used to different bold flavour profile, it's just a struggle for me to come to terms and wrap my head around all these big changes all at the same time. but I'll get there!
vegan4health is offline  
#8 Old 11-28-2016, 12:57 PM
Vegan since 1991
 
David3's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Posts: 3,634
Your nutritionist should be able to provide you with this information. Don't be afraid to make your nutritionist work for you. They should be able to provide you with sample meal plans, and lists of condiment brands that are suitable. The nutritionist should not leave you guessing wondering what to do next.
.

_________

Specific recommendations for a healthy diet include: eating more fruit, vegetables, legumes, nuts and grains; cutting down on salt, sugar and fats. It is also advisable to choose unsaturated fats, instead of saturated fats and towards the elimination of trans-fatty acids."
- United Nations' World Health Organization
http://www.who.int/topics/diet/en/
David3 is offline  
#9 Old 11-28-2016, 08:33 PM
Beginner
 
Join Date: Nov 2016
Location: PEI, Canada
Posts: 151
Quote:
Originally Posted by vegan4health View Post
Hi, she said they are bad for my thyroid. Soya and gluten are bad for autoimmune disease.
I have a slow thyroid and take Synthroid for it. So I can understand why the concern about soy and gluten but did the dietitian exclude all nuts for you? Walnuts and almonds are both goitregenic but what about hazelnuts and pecans and cashews?

I do use walnuts but I limit it to four halves because I do want the omega 3's that they provide and I try to take them after I've had my synthroid and kelp tablets.
121938 is offline  
#10 Old 12-02-2016, 06:28 PM
Newbie
 
Join Date: Nov 2016
Posts: 6
Quote:
Originally Posted by DebrahM View Post
I have a slow thyroid and take Synthroid for it. So I can understand why the concern about soy and gluten but did the dietitian exclude all nuts for you? Walnuts and almonds are both goitregenic but what about hazelnuts and pecans and cashews?

I do use walnuts but I limit it to four halves because I do want the omega 3's that they provide and I try to take them after I've had my synthroid and kelp tablets.
Hi, she allowed cashews on our second appointment. I'd have to ask about hazelnuts and pecans. I can do without soya but I love nuts! Do you avoid goitrogenic vegetables too? She gave me a long list of veggies I should avoid, so frustrating at first but I'm getting used to it now.
vegan4health is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the VeggieBoards forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
If you do not want to register, fill this field only and the name will be used as user name for your post.
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in


Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off