Can you eat too much tofu, beans and nuts? - VeggieBoards
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#1 Old 04-25-2014, 11:34 PM
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Can you eat too much tofu, beans and nuts......the reason I ask is I feel I may be as I can feel repulsed at the thought of eating them. So can you eat too much of them.

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#2 Old 04-26-2014, 02:43 AM
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Nuts are easy to overeat and binge on so I can see if that happens one might be sick of them for a period of time.  A few of them go a long way as far as nutrition.

 

It might be that you are making the same types of meals over and over and maybe you are tired of them and need some new ideas?  Or maybe you are concentrating too hard on getting in proteins without looking at the whole picture of your diet?  It is easy to get in a rut this way, feeling like you have to have some high protein source at the center of every meal.  Not saying you do any of these things, just suggestions based on my own experiences or observing others.  

 

I have been eating beans, nuts and seeds, tempeh, homemade seitan, whole grains, veggies, fruits etc for years and have yet to ever tire of them.  But I have had times where I ate the same kind of bean over a weeks time due to poor planning or some weird craving and may have gotten sick of that particular food for a little while.  There are just so many ways to prepare these foods that I am usually never bored...dips/spreads, sandwiches, soups, stir fries, casseroles, in baking, sauces, sprouted and raw, in salads, different ethnic dishes and styles, and the list goes on.  For example, have you ever tried mashed red potatoes with great northern white beans in the mix?  Or black bean enchiladas?  Or vegetarian split pea soup?  Or a chickpea salad sandwich with homemade nut based mayonnaise?  Or raw sprouted lentils in a garden salad?  How about red lentils in spaghetti sauce?  Or tofu pudding or in baking breads?  There are far more varieties of beans/legumes, nuts, seeds and other plant based sources of protein than there are animal proteins.  I can think of fifteen different types of beans alone off the top of my head (never mind the variety of nuts/seeds, whole grains, and veggies I can get protein from and easily grow my own too) but only a handful of farmed or hunted wild animals that humans eat and not a whole lot of ways to prepare those unless you depend on highly processed and unrecognizable byproducts (ie who came up with chicken nuggets or cheese sticks lol).  On the otherhand, I can also see how a little meat might provide more protein in one meal than a lot more beans, but I guess it depends on how you eat the beans or if you are combining them with other sources of protein (such as brown rice or quinoa, or with broccoli etc).  Or you could eat a serving of homemade seitan (from vital wheat gluten) and get more than the amount of protein in a steak without a lot of food combining etc.  I think often it is just thinking outside the box of what is considered the norm and being creative with food that makes all the difference, and eating more variety to meet your needs.  If you are not a natural cook, you are still in luck as there are so many vegetarian and vegan cookbooks on the market now and online blogs to help that it is mind blowing.  And people are still coming up with new ways to use foods.  The biggest discovery for me was making homemade mayonnaise using blanched almonds.  My omnivore husband likes this version so much more than his commercial mayo.  

 

I tend to plan out meals in advance (I admit I do have a bit of an obsessive compulsive tendency) but I do rotate the types of foods and dishes I eat so I am not eating the same things (or style) all the time and getting easily bored.  It keeps eating and cooking interesting for me and challenges me not to eat too little or avoid eating (a problem for me but that's for another post).  My lunches tend to be the same over a weeks time due to time constraints but I vary my dinners each day and rotate different breakfasts for variety.  For example, for breakfasts I might rotate different grains such as millet, oats, couscous, quinoa, whole grain toast, etc based on what is available or what I have on hand or am in the mood for, or choose to have them with beans or instead scramble some tempeh and leafy greens and fruit on the side.  Or have just a simple smoothie with chia seeds and leafy and fruit, or a chickpea flour omelete loaded with veggies.  When I was an omnivore, I would always eat either oatmeal with fruit or Greek yogurt with fruit every single morning.  I rarely varied my breakfasts except Saturdays.  

 

Before I quit rambling on and on, I should mention I experimented a ton with cashews in the beginning of being vegan because you can do so many things with them...alfredo sauce, cream cheese, homemade nut cheese etc.  I quickly developed an intolerance to them and would get very sick each time I consumed them.  I use blanched almonds now in place of cashews for recipes that call for them, but do not consume nuts on a daily basis.  I also developed an intolerance to tofu for a long time (cramps, diarrhea, gas) so avoided that but still didn't miss it much, but lately, after over two years of avoidance, I reintroduced it and can tolerate it fine.  I didn't eat those foods when I was an omnivore so it was a learning experience for my body.

 

Hope this helps!


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#3 Old 04-26-2014, 10:43 AM
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Originally Posted by karl1976 View Post

Can you eat too much tofu, beans and nuts......the reason I ask is I feel I may be as I can feel repulsed at the thought of eating them. So can you eat too much of them.
Are you asking about whether, from a health perspective, you can eat too many? If so,yes, you can eat too much of just about anything.....the goal is to have a well balanced diet. Eating tufo and nuts aren't a critical factor in a vegetarian diet, but you should be eating 3~5 servings of legumes (beans, lentils, peas, soy etc) a day. But that isn't a huge amount.

What are you eating?
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#4 Old 04-27-2014, 06:39 AM
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@logic.....I eat the range of protein sources, plenty of beans tofu and lots of nuts, mostly cashew, also almonds and walnuts. I feel the walnuts are problematic as they say don't eat too much.

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#5 Old 04-27-2014, 08:02 AM
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Hi karl. smiley.gif Anytime you change up your diet, there is usually digestive adjustments that take place. Sometimes feeling repulsed at food can relate to intestinal issues.

Otherwise, just vary up what you're eating. There's lots of variety that can be had in veg food and easy, quick recipes all over the web. Herbs and spices are your friends. smiley.gif

I think a well-balanced vegan diet includes all kinds of fruits and vegetables, lots of leafy greens, whole grains, beans, lentils, peas. Nuts and seeds, especially winter squash/pumpkin seeds (I'm eating them a lot lately.) Soymilk and tofu are good protein sources: I am sensitive to soy so avoid it and fairly easily get enough protein.

I'm a moderately active small woman in her 50's; my 21-year old vegan son is very active and eats a lot more food and also adds hemp or pea powder to his green smoothies. He likes the hemp powder because there is some fat in it as well as protein.
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#6 Old 04-27-2014, 12:20 PM
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@logic.....I eat the range of protein sources, plenty of beans tofu and lots of nuts, mostly cashew, also almonds and walnuts. I feel the walnuts are problematic as they say don't eat too much.
I'm talking about your diet as a whole, since protein is found in nearly all whole foods you don't need to include huge amounts of protein rich foods in your diet to meet your protein needs. Eating 3~5 servings of legumes a day along with other foods (whole grains, vegetables, fruit,nuts, etc) will meet your protein needs. Nuts, contrary to popular belief, aren't a protein rich food....on average they have the same amount of protein as grains per calorie. That doesn't mean you shouldn't eat them, but you should think of them as primarily a source of fat.

Walnuts are low in protein but are a good source of omega-3. Eat them as a small snack or to garnish a meal.
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#7 Old 04-27-2014, 12:27 PM
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Originally Posted by karl1976 View Post

Can you eat too much tofu, beans and nuts......the reason I ask is I feel I may be as I can feel repulsed at the thought of eating them. So can you eat too much of them.

You can eat too much of anything. One winter my dad and I were so poor we basically ate potatoes the entire winter. It took me four years to get over that one.

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#8 Old 04-27-2014, 12:42 PM
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You can eat too much of anything. One winter my dad and I were so poor we basically ate potatoes the entire winter. It took me four years to get over that one.

That sucks! Something similar happened to me, except that it was because I was depressed and got physically sick. Basically, the only thing I could manage to swallow and keep in my stomach was couscous, so I was eating that for every meal for about 3 months. It got to a point that I was so sick of couscous that my stomach wasn't accepting it anymore either. This was in 2009. I only ate couscous again in 2013. Once.

 

On topic: If you feel you're not eating a wide enough variety of foods rich in protein, I suggest: Chickpea flour pancakes (one has about 10 grams of protein), and whole grain bread with peanut butter. One slice of whole grain bread has 5 grams of protein, so a sandwich with peanut butter will give over 10 grams of protein.


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#9 Old 04-27-2014, 01:11 PM
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You definitely can overeat on these things.  Too much protein is bad for Vegans just as it is for anyone else (though the health problems seem to be worse with animal products).  Protein overload causes me to have some really odd digestive issues. 

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