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#1 Old 04-28-2012, 06:02 PM
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Hi everyone!

I am writing this as I feel very conflicted at the moment. I am seriously considering becoming vegetarian/vegan however there are many factors in my life that seem to make it difficult.

I consider myself an animal lover. I'm a Veterinary Nurse, have 2 gorgeous furbabies of my own (a rescue cat and a Miniature Dachshund), have tried to be as good a consumer as possible - my cleaning/beauty products on the most part are vegan, I have read about animal cruelty and watched documentaries on the subject and buy free range/organic animal products. But recently I feel this isn't enough and the decisions I've made (ie. organic/free range animal products) aren't that great afterall (for example I was shocked to learn the male chicks are killed in the egg industry - even the free range/organic industry).

I do want to become more educated on this issue of animal welfare and actually physically go to places with farm animals. I don't know if this sounds weird but I want to try and break down the barriers between the meat on my plate and where it comes from. There's a farm sanctuary about an hour away from me with rescued factory farmed animals I want to go. I feel like it well help cement my feelings and give me more physical evidence when talking to my partner, his family about my reasons why to become vegetarian. I want first hand experience. Would it be worthwhile contacting animal liberation in my state and enquiring about this??

I was a vegetarian when I was young - around 11 - 12 years old, however I became anaemic and my mum didn't want me to continue it anymore. Being so young I was easily persuaded!

There are a few aspects of my life which make this decision hard.

A small aspect is my job. As a Veterinary Nurse I sell meat and animal products, pre packaged pet foods, medications that would have been tested on animals. There's not really anyway to get around this.

Second is my wonderful partner of 7 years. He is a chef and cooking, in his words last night "is a massive part of our relationship" and he feels that by becoming vegetarian/vegan I would be taking this away. None of our friends or his family (we don't see mine) are vegetarian or vegan and he feels it will be difficult, isolating for me, etc. My partner doesn't believe people should be vegetarian/vegan although he considers himself a lover of animals and buys free range/organic animal products. He has suggested not to become vegetarian/vegan but instead go to farmers markets more often and buy animal products from small farmers, thereby cutting out all factory farming. While we wouldn't break up or anything drastic I have a feeling that by becoming a vegetarian/vegan it would be a massive issue for my partner and will not make him happy. He also has said he is not prepared to cook vegetarian meals instead and that I can do all my cooking. He is such a wonderful person I have actually been quite shocked from his reaction.

If I weren't with my partner I know I would be a vegetarian/vegan.

I am also worried about going out to restaurants, etc given my partners and I lives revolve around food and dining out so much. I have done some research and found many nice restaurants do vegan degustations, etc and the area we live in is very vegan friendly! What do I do at family functions and how do I broach that I have become a vegetarian if/when I make that decision with everyone??

I'm not so worried about the nutrition side as I've studied nutrition in the past. I'm a good cook (if I do say so myself!) and have lots of vegetarian cookbooks, etc. Our housemate is also vegan so have had alot of helpful advice from her.

I am also trying to get my mind around - if/when I become a vegan/vegetarian I want to make a difference - but I'm only 1 person, how much of a difference can I make against animal cruelty?? It seems impossible when I think of all the factory farming, meat in shops and restaurants, etc, etc.

Sorry this is so long winded. Ultimately I have to make my own decisions but I wondered if anyone had any advice or faced such difficulties with their partners/living with omni's?

Thanks for reading
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#2 Old 04-28-2012, 07:04 PM
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I'm sorry you're torn. I know, from personal experience, that happiness comes from following your heart, and compromising on important issues can be draining when you know deep down that what you want is compassionate, healthy, and wise. I was lucky that when I went vegetarian and then vegan, I had the support of my husband, although he was skeptical at first! It's been nearly 6 years since I went vegan, and he's changed from being a big meat eater to being almost vegetarian.

You may try to approach your partner with the idea that experimenting with vegan cuisine will broaden his cooking repertoire. I'm sure there's a need for vegan chefs, and even if he doesn't went to be vegan, having some tried and true recipes may help his career in the long run. And do let him know that while farmer's markets may offer organic products, there is no guarantee that the animals live any better or die less brutally. Most small farmers still use slaughterhouses and try to practice "efficient" farming (premature death, forced impregnation, crowded conditions).

You'll be happiest in the long run if you live your life in a manner that respects your conscience. A relationship with an omni can work, believe me, as long as both partners are respectful of each other. Being controlled or belittled is no fun. Give your partner some time, and let him ask questions. Good luck!

It is our choices that show what we truly are far more than our abilities. ~A. Dumbledore
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#3 Old 04-28-2012, 08:16 PM
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My view, and it will probably be unpopular is that you do what ever you can do within the practical boundaries of environment, family, relationship, employment and so on. For some people it's being vegan, others like myself vegetarian and yet others pick and choose for a variety of reasons.

A reduction in meat consumption ultimately leading to the vegetarian/vegan lifestyle of your choice is addressing your concerns in a controlled way.....in my opinion.

The difference you make could be looked at from a range of perspectives, you are not consuming animal products, you are contributing to demand for vegan/vegetarian foods and products, you are increasing the numbers of people that have a conscience about animal welfare, you are an individual with integrity.

I face conflicting situations regularly, an example was exposure to the cattle trade to Indonesia via transport logistics, very sad indeed and particularly so when we had seen on TV how those peaceful animals were mistreated over there.

I hope that helps in some way.
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#4 Old 04-28-2012, 09:35 PM
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Why don't you start by becoming a "weekday vegetarian"? That way you're not totally changing our identity or the things your boyfriend feels are necessary, but you'll be drastically reducing your animal product consumption and testing out the waters to see if you want to go all the way vegetarian. Monday through Friday you eat only plants. Saturday and Sunday, you eat whatever you boyfriend makes. And you suggest that HE by animal products at farmers markets, not you.

If all works out well, then you can go vegetarian or vegan full-time when you feel you're really ready and/or your boyfriend gets less codependent on meat. This way, as a part time veg, you don't have to even contemplate the "should I or shouldn't I" issue. You just plain eat fewer animals than you're currently eating. Simple.
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#5 Old 04-28-2012, 10:16 PM
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As for your husband, can he cook veg at home? Tell him there are numerous vegan chefs out there even vegan restaurants. You can make gourmet vegan food just as you can make regular food.

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#6 Old 04-28-2012, 11:12 PM
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Welcome.

If you've done your research and you know how much suffering goes into animal products - free range or not - and if you don't like the thought of killing a healthy animal for a taste preference regardless - I don't know how you might be able to live congruently with yourself and consume animals and their products.

I don't think it's in any way reasonable for your guy to expect you to put a taste preference and convenience over your morals. I don't know why he would be so resistant to making veg meals, since he likes to cook, and no one has an ethical problem with cooking plant products.

I think you can be polite and kind, but still have the courage to stand your ground and live by your morals. I wouldn't compromise on this and eat meat because a guy wants you to - that's ridiculous. It's your body. Maybe show your guy Earthlings too (go too http://www.earthlings.com and watch for free).

"If you want to know where you would have stood on slavery before the civil war, don't look at where you stand on slavery today, look at where you stand on animal rights." - Paul Watson.

 

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#7 Old 04-29-2012, 12:02 AM
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The restaurant thing is not that difficult, especially if you just peek at their menus online first. That way you have an idea of what non-meat dishes you can order.

As far as your partner goes, many chefs get freaked out thinking veg food is bland and out of his realm of expertise. In addition, having a vegan housemate may make him feel he'll be outnumbered. Does the housemate talking about animal issues make your partner uncomfortable?

ElaineV's going veg weekdays idea is innovative and might be just the thing for your situation. I hope you find a way to be at ease with your conscience and your family.

Oh and here's my 12-year old mini dachshund, Pepper. Aren't they the best?
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#8 Old 04-29-2012, 12:33 AM
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From what I am reading in between the lines your partner seems threatned by you wanting to go veg. Does he get the impression that you admire him for his cooking skills ?
You already seem to be a person who is a vegan in disguise, as your love and respect of animals comes through in a strong manner.

Your partner states that cooking plays a major role in your relationship. Prehaps you could find some other way of enjoying other aspects in life ?

He says that he's not going to change his way of cooking. You say you can cook so I would stick to your guns before you start to ressent him.
Many omni/veg couples seem to work it out and if he really is a fantastic person who respects you, the two of you will find a compromise.
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#9 Old 04-29-2012, 01:14 AM
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I was a cook for many years. While I did the work of, and had the training to be, everything from a Saucier to an Executive Chef, and was sometimes even called by those titles, I never did the testing and paperwork required to actually hold the title of Chef. But I still think I can see what might be bothering your partner.

A lot of cooks get deeply into the art, it's part of what makes them good at what they do. It becomes a large part of their identity and is tied to their sense of their self worth. For a large portion of my life if you had asked me who I was, I would have replied that I was a cook.

He's trained in and is most likely very good at cooking meat dishes, and is rightly proud of those skills, and enjoys using them.

He also might feel that these skills were a large part of what he brought to your relationship, what made him worth having a relationship with.

When you said you wanted to go Veg*n, something he didn't have a skill set for, deep down he felt this as a rejection of him. He might not even be conscience of why it bothers him so much.

Or he might just be a selfish *******.

If he's the first type of person give him time to come around. Go Veg*n on the meals you don't eat together, add more salads and fruits to the meals you do share, and give him time to adjust. He should come around.

I am my own bad companion

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#10 Old 04-29-2012, 02:07 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dropkick View Post

I was a cook for many years. While I did the work of, and had the training to be, everything from a Saucier to an Executive Chef, and was sometimes even called by those titles, I never did the testing and paperwork required to actually hold the title of Chef. But I still think I can see what might be bothering your partner.

A lot of cooks get deeply into the art, it's part of what makes them good at what they do. It becomes a large part of their identity and is tied to their sense of their self worth. For a large portion of my life if you had asked me who I was, I would have replied that I was a cook.

He's trained in and is most likely very good at cooking meat dishes, and is rightly proud of those skills, and enjoys using them.

He also might feel that these skills were a large part of what he brought to your relationship, what made him worth having a relationship with.

When you said you wanted to go Veg*n, something he didn't have a skill set for, deep down he felt this as a rejection of him. He might not even be conscience of why it bothers him so much.

Or he might just be selfish *******.

If he's the first type of person give him time to come around. Go Veg*n on the meals you don't eat together, add more salads and fruits to the meals you do share, and give him time to adjust. He should come around.

We will see !
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#11 Old 04-30-2012, 09:29 AM
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I'm really sorry you're torn at the moment but believe me it, will get resolved.

1) About being a veterinary nurse, I don't think it will or should affect you for a couple of reasons. I've just made the decision to drop out of uni (where I study/ied History) and train to become a veterinary nurse. One of my biggest fears about doing this is about having to instruct pet owners on animal diets which invariably involve meat. Firstly, I think the wonderful thing about choosing to go vegan is that it is a CHOICE. It shows that we're compassionate and caring because we CHOOSE to go veg*n, we don't just follow the crowd and eat flesh or hen periods because its what we've been brought up to do. It shows we are educated and able to make a decision using information presented to us: we face up to reality and choose to try and change that, rather than just bury our heads in the sand like ostriches don't do. Animals don't have that choice because they're dominated by animal instincts. For cats, for example, their natural diet is purely carnivorous (As opposed to dogs who are omnivores). Given the choice, my cat would have turkey any day over a carrot. But cats can thrive on a vegan diet, though it may be a little difficult to get things off the ground. I think your job is a wonderful opportunity to educate people on the possibilities of a vegan diet for animals and, by association, for themselves. The medicines, well, that's not really something you can get around. I just had an image of my cat being like "HELL NAW B*TCH" when I tried to give her some medicine... anyway. I think also, its one of those things where the good outweighs the bad. You're helping animals get better and enjoy a fruitful life AND you're not eating them! I think that's win (almost) win in my book.

2) Cooking may be a "massive part of your relationship" but it shouldn't be the only one! Why not try to find something else to do together? Maybe try cooking for him like another poster suggested and if he doesn't eat it, then, really what kind of chef is he? Don't know about you, but I don't want a chef who cooks the same foods all the time and isn't creative. I think, for myself, veg*n got my even more creative. Its so easy when you're an omnivore to put a piece of animal, some rice and a vegetable on a plate and call it a balanced meal, but dude, where's the fun? Now, I only have to look at a veg*n cookbook and I'm drooling. Going to farmers markets may, potentially, cut out the factory farming aspect but it doesn't change the fact that something died so you can eat for 30 minutes.

3) Eating out is a problem, but realistically more people are going veg*n nowadays and more restaurants are meeting the supply for veg*n food and its definitely a problem that can be overcome pretty easily. Veganism isn't just for the spaced out whackos who still think its Woodstock. Even health conscious omnis opt for animal-free food because it is healthier. Its easy to miss vegan options on a restaurants menu because we're so used to looking for animal products,but vegan options are there and restaurants are normally able to adapt veggie and even some omni foods. Where abouts in Oz are you? I have some friends dotted about out there so I can ask them for restaurant ideas. And also don't forget the Aussie board on here: they'll be able to give more local advice about eating vegan as a whole.

Lastly, I commend your decision to turn vegan. Sometimes people get threatened with people going against the norm (my meat and two veg family acted the same way as your partner) and react like this, but just stick to your guns and it always tends to phase out. They'll see that you're serious and will leave you alone, at least, but more often than not join in. Case in point, when I first went vegan my mum was like "WTFM8!YOUWILLDIE" or something like that anyway, but I stuck to it and she began to see that vegan foods were't flavourless, just death-less. Then, recently my brother went vegetarian and now she's like "WTFM8!WHERE'STHECARROTS" or something like that. Sometimes its really difficult to overcome someone's opbringing and in your partner's case, his career. That's a huuuuuuuuuge chunk of his life which is under threat but as along as he sees it won't be a problem unless he makes it one then he'll come around. Not really sure what I posted here, but I hope it helps!

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#12 Old 05-01-2012, 09:03 AM
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Cooking is one of the things I love most about being veg. It has forced me to get creative. Sometimes I'll spend hours browsing food blogs. I am enjoying what I cook and eat much more now that I'm veg. Perhaps explain to your partner that cooking can still be a big part, it'll just include trying new types of food. You can really be a gourmet vegan.

Vegetarian with vegan tendencies.
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#13 Old 05-01-2012, 09:14 AM
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every single thing you do matters. if you change yourself, you change the world.


Once upon a time, there was a wise man who used to go to the ocean to do his writing. He had a habit of walking on the beach before he began his work. One day, as he was walking along the shore, he looked down the beach and saw a human figure moving like a dancer. He smiled to himself at the thought of someone who would dance to the day, and so, he walked faster to catch up.

As he got closer, he noticed that the figure was that of a young man, and that what he was doing was not dancing at all. The young man was reaching down to the shore, picking up small objects, and throwing them into the ocean.

He came closer still and called out "Good morning! May I ask what it is that you are doing?"

The young man paused, looked up, and replied "Throwing starfish into the ocean."

"I must ask, then, why are you throwing starfish into the ocean?" asked the somewhat startled wise man.

To this, the young man replied, "The sun is up and the tide is going out. If I don't throw them in, they'll die."

Upon hearing this, the wise man commented, "But, young man, do you not realize that there are miles and miles of beach and there are starfish all along every mile? You can't possibly make a difference!"

At this, the young man bent down, picked up yet another starfish, and threw it into the ocean. As it met the water, he said, "It made a difference for that one."
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#14 Old 05-01-2012, 09:59 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by penny79 View Post

every single thing you do matters. if you change yourself, you change the world.


Once upon a time, there was a wise man who used to go to the ocean to do his writing. He had a habit of walking on the beach before he began his work. One day, as he was walking along the shore, he looked down the beach and saw a human figure moving like a dancer. He smiled to himself at the thought of someone who would dance to the day, and so, he walked faster to catch up.

As he got closer, he noticed that the figure was that of a young man, and that what he was doing was not dancing at all. The young man was reaching down to the shore, picking up small objects, and throwing them into the ocean.

He came closer still and called out "Good morning! May I ask what it is that you are doing?"

The young man paused, looked up, and replied "Throwing starfish into the ocean."

"I must ask, then, why are you throwing starfish into the ocean?" asked the somewhat startled wise man.

To this, the young man replied, "The sun is up and the tide is going out. If I don't throw them in, they'll die."

Upon hearing this, the wise man commented, "But, young man, do you not realize that there are miles and miles of beach and there are starfish all along every mile? You can't possibly make a difference!"

At this, the young man bent down, picked up yet another starfish, and threw it into the ocean. As it met the water, he said, "It made a difference for that one."

Ahh I love this!

I love my friends. So I don't eat them
I love animals. So I don't eat them either
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#15 Old 05-01-2012, 01:47 PM
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Originally Posted by arcoftime View Post

I'm really sorry you're torn at the moment but believe me it, will get resolved.

1) About being a veterinary nurse, I don't think it will or should affect you for a couple of reasons. I've just made the decision to drop out of uni (where I study/ied History) and train to become a veterinary nurse. One of my biggest fears about doing this is about having to instruct pet owners on animal diets which invariably involve meat. Firstly, I think the wonderful thing about choosing to go vegan is that it is a CHOICE. It shows that we're compassionate and caring because we CHOOSE to go veg*n, we don't just follow the crowd and eat flesh or hen periods because its what we've been brought up to do. It shows we are educated and able to make a decision using information presented to us: we face up to reality and choose to try and change that, rather than just bury our heads in the sand like ostriches don't do. Animals don't have that choice because they're dominated by animal instincts. For cats, for example, their natural diet is purely carnivorous (As opposed to dogs who are omnivores). Given the choice, my cat would have turkey any day over a carrot. But cats can thrive on a vegan diet, though it may be a little difficult to get things off the ground. I think your job is a wonderful opportunity to educate people on the possibilities of a vegan diet for animals and, by association, for themselves. The medicines, well, that's not really something you can get around. I just had an image of my cat being like "HELL NAW B*TCH" when I tried to give her some medicine... anyway. I think also, its one of those things where the good outweighs the bad. You're helping animals get better and enjoy a fruitful life AND you're not eating them! I think that's win (almost) win in my book.

2) Cooking may be a "massive part of your relationship" but it shouldn't be the only one! Why not try to find something else to do together? Maybe try cooking for him like another poster suggested and if he doesn't eat it, then, really what kind of chef is he? Don't know about you, but I don't want a chef who cooks the same foods all the time and isn't creative. I think, for myself, veg*n got my even more creative. Its so easy when you're an omnivore to put a piece of animal, some rice and a vegetable on a plate and call it a balanced meal, but dude, where's the fun? Now, I only have to look at a veg*n cookbook and I'm drooling. Going to farmers markets may, potentially, cut out the factory farming aspect but it doesn't change the fact that something died so you can eat for 30 minutes.

3) Eating out is a problem, but realistically more people are going veg*n nowadays and more restaurants are meeting the supply for veg*n food and its definitely a problem that can be overcome pretty easily. Veganism isn't just for the spaced out whackos who still think its Woodstock. Even health conscious omnis opt for animal-free food because it is healthier. Its easy to miss vegan options on a restaurants menu because we're so used to looking for animal products,but vegan options are there and restaurants are normally able to adapt veggie and even some omni foods. Where abouts in Oz are you? I have some friends dotted about out there so I can ask them for restaurant ideas. And also don't forget the Aussie board on here: they'll be able to give more local advice about eating vegan as a whole.

Lastly, I commend your decision to turn vegan. Sometimes people get threatened with people going against the norm (my meat and two veg family acted the same way as your partner) and react like this, but just stick to your guns and it always tends to phase out. They'll see that you're serious and will leave you alone, at least, but more often than not join in. Case in point, when I first went vegan my mum was like "WTFM8!YOUWILLDIE" or something like that anyway, but I stuck to it and she began to see that vegan foods were't flavourless, just death-less. Then, recently my brother went vegetarian and now she's like "WTFM8!WHERE'STHECARROTS" or something like that. Sometimes its really difficult to overcome someone's opbringing and in your partner's case, his career. That's a huuuuuuuuuge chunk of his life which is under threat but as along as he sees it won't be a problem unless he makes it one then he'll come around. Not really sure what I posted here, but I hope it helps!

"WTFM8!YOUWILLDIE"
Oh how I'm too familiar with this! xD
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#16 Old 05-01-2012, 06:17 PM
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Originally Posted by emmy25 View Post

Second is my wonderful partner of 7 years. He is a chef and cooking, in his words last night "is a massive part of our relationship" and he feels that by becoming vegetarian/vegan I would be taking this away.

If this ever becomes a problem you need to realize that it will be his fault for being unwilling to accept your growth, rather than your fault for growing, so don't let him blame you, in case he tries.

Each of us has the right to change and grow, and we have the right to expect anyone who loves us and has committed to us to understand this and support our growth. You may love each other very much and have a wonderful, committed relationship, but he has no right to demand that you never change, and it is his duty to support your growth, not hinder it or undermine it, just as I am sure you support him in return.

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#17 Old 05-01-2012, 08:12 PM
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1) Veganism is a choice for humans. Cats are domestic because of humans control, and deserve to live as best they know, which is being cared for and fed appropriate foods. I've yet to believe plant based diets are appropriate, and not willing to subject mine to research.

2) People come and go through your life, and many leave deep impressions, good and bad. You however, are always going to be left with yourself, day and night. If you don't control yourself you'll always be looking outside for guidance. Don't live your life wishing you've done what you wanted.

3) After realizing how amazing vegan cooking can be I can't abide anyone with an interest in food who would dismiss vegan choices.
Why does he feel people shouldn't be veg*n?

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#18 Old 05-02-2012, 03:14 AM
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Thank you so very, very much to everyone that has responded to my post. I really appreciate it. I only know a couple of vegans/vegetarians so it is so helpful to have an online community I can go to!

My partner and I have spoken more about this and for the time being have come to a sort of compromise that I am happy with. I am going to be vegan/vegetarian for the time I am away from him (which is quite alot given his long work hours!) I will also slowly cook more vegan dishes for him and when at restaurants with him order vegan/vegetarian foods. Baby steps, not rushed, so I can adapt and he can understand where I'm coming from. But eventually, I am going to become vegan. That might be as soon as my birthday in July or the end of the year at the latest - I will see how I go.

He works at an asian restaurant/bar which actually has amazing vegan and vegetarian food - so he can cook it! He just prefers meat based dishes and the dishes he has perfected at home are meat based. He also believes humans are meant to eat meat nutritionally and has been brought up. It also doesn't help for example his brother in law is from south america - so family get togethers invariably revolve around bbqs, meat, etc!

I have been eating more vegetarian/vegan foods recently and I have realised part of the problem is habit and being used to something/a lifestyle (say for example its a cold winter night - it would normally have been roast chicken, a stew, etc but now I have to get creative!)

Dropkick Thank you for your post. What you said is true - it is very much his identity. He works 50 hour weeks and then comes home to cook, shops for food,buys kitchen stuff - its his life!! He isn't a selfish *******, I just think my decision has to him come out of the blue (although I don't think so), it goes against his family upbringing/lifestyle, etc, etc. He said if I am vegan he is going to support me but at the moment he can't see himself cooking vegan food at home - I have a feeling it will be fine! (eventually )

He just needs to realise - cheffing/cooking is his 'thing' - animals are mine. It is my job, my beliefs, my thoughts and it is time to start putting it into action, my lifestyle should reflect my beliefs and feelings.

Thanks arcoftime for such a detailed response! I'm glad your becoming a Vet Nurse - I LOVE my job, its amazing! Thanks for making me realise the good I do outweighs the bad (ie meat products and animal tested medications)

Thank you ade903 I've been looking at my housemates vegan cookbooks - Vegan Pie in the Sky - yummy! You can be a gourmet vegan.

Thank you so much Somebody Else So true, thanks.

Silva Thank you! I agree regarding feeding cats - they are obligate carnivores and unfortunately don't fare well on high carbohydrate foods (urinary problems, diabetes, obesity, etc). Plus look at their teeth! Large canines - teeth we don't share in appearance and function!

Shyvas 'Vegan in disguise' - thank you, I took that in such a happy way - my thoughts are finally starting to be aligned with my actions!

LedBoots Aww your doxie is gorgeous! Our housemate is actually not one to discuss animal welfare at home unless I ask her! She has even said "I am the least preachy vegan ever!" She prefers her actions to speak louder than words. I feel like I'm like this too! And have tried to tell my partner I am not going to attack him because of being a chef that cooks meat! (he at least goes one step better than omnis and buys free range, organic produce, etc)

Irizary I watched Earthlings. It's horrible My partner isn't one for "vegan scare videos" so he won't watch stuff like this unfortunately.

Vefo and ElaineB thanks - a slow approach to veganism is what I'm going to do to allow my partner and family/friends to get used to the idea!

DoktorMartini Hopefully I can get him to cook more vegetarian things

Poppy Thanks for giving me hope this can work at home with an omni partner!


penny 79 thanks for sharing that story, I think I've heard it before, but it definitely can be compared to how I'm feeling. Thanks!
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#19 Old 05-02-2012, 03:39 AM
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For anything it may be worth Emmy ..

I became vegetarian partly because I loved to cook.

Being meat-centric limited my cooking to a base of around 1/2 dozen main key flavours (red meat, white meat, fish, game, cheese, eggs).

Vegetarian cooking, particularly because of the need to become skilfull with herb and spice combinations, gave me far more fun in the kitchen, not less.
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#20 Old 05-02-2012, 03:41 AM
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Originally Posted by ade903 View Post

Cooking is one of the things I love most about being veg. It has forced me to get creative. Sometimes I'll spend hours browsing food blogs. I am enjoying what I cook and eat much more now that I'm veg. Perhaps explain to your partner that cooking can still be a big part, it'll just include trying new types of food. You can really be a gourmet vegan.

Yes! Like this ^
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#21 Old 05-02-2012, 03:48 AM
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Originally Posted by Clueless Git View Post

For anything it may be worth Emmy ..

I became vegetarian partly because I loved to cook.

Being meat-centric limited my cooking to a base of around 1/2 dozen main key flavours (red meat, white meat, fish, game, cheese, eggs).

Vegetarian cooking, particularly because of the need to become skilfull with herb and spice combinations, gave me far more fun in the kitchen, not less.

Thanks So true! I am realising this you have get more creative in the kitchen! I actually made a really nice tempeh pilaf the other night with lots of herbs and spices - I'm not usually good at pilafs but this had yummy cinnamon, ginger, coriander, paprika - it was delicious!
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#22 Old 05-02-2012, 07:57 AM
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Originally Posted by silva View Post

1) Veganism is a choice for humans. Cats are domestic because of humans control, and deserve to live as best they know, which is being cared for and fed appropriate foods. I've yet to believe plant based diets are appropriate, and not willing to subject mine to research.

I was agreeing... my cats aren't vegan and never will be. I think there are too many potentially serious/fatal problems involved with trying to make a cat go vegan - but I was trying not to offend anybody who has a vegan cat ^.^

"The love for all living creatures is the most noble attribute of man." - Charles Darwin
http://leighonamission.wordress.com
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