soy and breast cancer myth... - VeggieBoards
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#1 Old 12-30-2009, 01:16 AM
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as I sat there drinking my Silk Original soymilk, the first thing that came out of my friends mouth was, "you know there's a study that showed drinking soymilk causes breast cancer..."



... my initial response was to give him the birdie and to tell him to "shove it"....



I've briefly looked at breast cancer and soy links and I'm still confused... is it a myth?



I'm gonna go crazy with all these 'new studies' that have links to cancer with even the healthiest foods!



so... is it a myth?
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#2 Old 12-30-2009, 01:44 AM
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The average person in Taiwan eats 41lbs of tofu per year, not to mention many other soya products. Are the streets of Taiwan littered with people who've died from breast cancer? No.



The meat and dairy industries have lots of money to spend on 'research' that will make their competitors products less appealing to consumers. Soy milk and other soy products sales have soared in the last decade while meat and dairy sales have not risen so much. Soy is a threat to the powerful meat and dairy industry.



So for any research or study on soy you need to ask 1) who funded this research? 2) Where was the research conducted? 3) Whom do the researchers work for? 4) What is the motivation behind this research?





Another consideration is the people who have successfully treated their breast cancer by replacing dairy milk with soya milk as part of their diet: Read this for an explanation on why there is so much negative press on soya:

http://www.canceractive.com/cancer-a...nk.aspx?n=1430
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#3 Old 12-30-2009, 02:28 AM
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I just read another article, I think in the Veg Times Healing Foods, that soy in women is ok in moderation, you don't need to avoid it, but for older woman who are menopausal, the verdict still isn't clear. They say to go ahead and enjoy it if in the younger yrs.



This is one of those slippery slides, that I don't think they want to give full out recommendations on. Supposedly, it is still heart healthy, but not to the extent originally thought previously too. This may be a decision you have to read up on, and then make for your own. the rare time I eat fake food or eat edamame is about the highest amts I eat at one time, just because I'm not a big soy eater anyway.....besideds what's put into food.

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#4 Old 12-30-2009, 08:36 AM
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I buy strictly organic soy milk because a HUGE percent (~90%) of soy in the U.S.A. is GMO.

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#5 Old 12-30-2009, 08:56 AM
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I have to admit that, whether justified or not, I still have some concerns regarding soy products. Traditionally the peoples who have consumed soy products over the centuries have fermented it which apparently removes much of it's harmful qualities. The stuff we buy nowadays is mostly unfermented and produced as quickly and cheaply as possible with gmo crops. As MrFalafel pointed out the Taiwanese may well consume 41 pounds of tofu per year on average, but that still only equates to less than two ounces per day. The dairy lobby in the U.S. may be huge, but trust me the soy lobby is quite large and powerful itself and will promote its own interests as well. Everything in moderation I guess.
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#6 Old 12-30-2009, 09:05 AM
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The source is neither from soy manufacturers or anti-soy groups. I got the article from MescapeCME which is a continuing ed source for nurses, and you have to register, so I can't link it. The study was published in the Journal of the American Medical Association which charges for their articles.



But the bottom line of this study (mind you, it's one study, but a legit one) is: "Among women with breast cancer, soy food consumption was significantly associated with decreased risk of death and recurrence," the study authors write."





December 14, 2009 — Dietary soy intake among Chinese women with breast cancer is significantly associated with lower risk for death and recurrence, according to the results of a large, population-based cohort study reported in the December 9 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.



"Soy foods are rich in isoflavones, a major group of phytoestrogens that have been hypothesized to reduce the risk of breast cancer," write Xiao Ou Shu, MD, PhD, from Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Nashville, Tennessee, and colleagues. "However, the estrogen-like effect of isoflavones and the potential interaction between isoflavones and tamoxifen have led to concern about soy food consumption among breast cancer patients."



The study goal was to determine the association of dietary soy intake after diagnosis of breast cancer with total mortality and cancer recurrence. In the Shanghai Breast Cancer Survival Study of 5042 female breast cancer survivors in China, women 20 to 75 years of age who were diagnosed between March 2002 and April 2006 were recruited and followed up through June 2009.



At about 6 months after cancer diagnosis, participants provided information on cancer diagnosis and treatment, lifestyle exposures after cancer diagnosis, and disease progression. Three follow-up interviews at 18, 36, and 60 months after diagnosis allowed updating of this information. To obtain survival information for participants who were lost to follow-up, the investigators used annual record linkage with the Shanghai Vital Statistics Registry database. Disease and treatment information were verified from medical record review.



Primary study endpoints were total mortality and breast cancer recurrence or breast cancer–related deaths. Adjustment for known clinical predictors and other lifestyle factors was performed using Cox regression analysis, with dietary soy intake treated as a time-dependent variable. Median follow-up was 3.9 years (range, 0.5 - 6.2 years).



During follow-up of 5033 breast cancer patients treated with surgery, there were 444 deaths and 534 recurrences or breast cancer–related deaths. Soy food intake, measured by either soy protein or soy isoflavone intake, was inversely associated with mortality and recurrence. Compared with the lowest quartile of intake of soy protein intake, the hazard ratio for the highest quartile was 0.71 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.54 - 0.92) for total mortality and 0.68 (95% CI, 0.54 - 0.87) for recurrence. For women in the lowest and highest quartiles of soy protein intake, the multivariate-adjusted 4-year mortality rates were 10.3% and 7.4%, and the 4-year recurrence rates were 11.2% and 8.0%, respectively. Women with either estrogen receptor–positive or estrogen receptor–negative breast cancer exhibited this inverse association, as did both users and nonusers of tamoxifen.



"Among women with breast cancer, soy food consumption was significantly associated with decreased risk of death and recurrence," the study authors write.



Limitations of this study include a relatively short follow-up period and limited statistical power for subanalyses, such as estrogen receptor status or tamoxifen use status.



"In this population-based prospective study, we found that soy food intake is safe and was associated with lower mortality and recurrence among breast cancer patients," the study authors conclude. "The association of soy food intake with mortality and recurrence appears to follow a linear dose-response pattern until soy food intake reached 11 grams/day of soy protein; no additional benefits on mortality and recurrence were observed with higher intakes of soy food. This study suggests that moderate soy food intake is safe and potentially beneficial for women with breast cancer."



In an accompanying editorial, Rachel Ballard-Barbash, MD, MPH, from the National Cancer Institute in Bethesda, Maryland, and Marian L. Neuhouser, PhD, from the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle, Washington, note differences between China and the United States in the quality, type, and quantity of soy food intake. Differences in screening rates and other factors in China compared with the United States may also preclude comparisons of stage- and treatment-specific results.



"Even though the findings by Shu et al suggest that consumption of soy foods among breast cancer patients is probably safe, studies in larger cohorts are required to understand the effects of these foods among diverse clinical subgroups of breast cancer patients and survivors," the editorialists write. "In the meantime, clinicians can advise their patients with breast cancer that soy foods are safe to eat and that these foods may offer some protective benefit for long-term health. Moreover, the potential benefits are confined to soy foods, and inferences should not be made about the risks or benefits of soy-containing dietary supplements."



The US Department of Defense Breast Cancer Research Program and the National Cancer Institute supported this study. Dr. Shu reports having received a research development fund from the United Soybean Board in 2005. The other study authors and editorialists have disclosed no relevant financial relationships.



JAMA. 2009;302:2437-2443, 2483-2484.



Clinical Context



Adjuvant therapy for breast cancer includes blocking the effect of estrogen, noted by Moundsen and colleagues in the August 2003 issue of Breast. Isoflavones, a major group of phytoestrogens found in soy foods, have estrogen-like and antiestrogenic effects, as reported by Adlercreutz and Mazur in the April 1997 issue of the Annals of Medicine. In the April 5, 2006, issue of the Journal of the National Cancer Institute, a meta-analysis by Trock and colleagues found an inverse relationship between soy food intake and the risk for breast cancer. However, it is not clear whether breast cancer treatment and soy isoflavones might interact in an adverse manner.



This longitudinal, population-based cohort study, using the Shanghai Breast Cancer Survival Study data, assesses the link between soy food intake and mortality and breast cancer recurrence in women diagnosed with breast cancer.
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#7 Old 12-30-2009, 09:06 AM
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Study Highlights



•5042 women aged 20 to 75 years were recruited into the Shanghai Breast Cancer Survival Study during a 4-year period approximately 6 months after breast cancer diagnosis.

•Exclusion criteria were refusal to participate, absence during enrollment, lack of contact, and health or communication problems.

•Nonparticipants vs participants were similar in age but were more likely to have advanced stage of cancer.

•The investigators conducted data analysis on 5033 patients, after excluding 9 patients who did not have surgical treatment.

•Data on cancer diagnosis, treatment, lifestyle exposures after diagnosis, and disease progression were obtained approximately 6.5 months after diagnosis.

•3 follow-up interviews are scheduled at 18, 36, and 60 months after diagnosis.

•Soy intake was measured by a validated food frequency questionnaire at 18 months for the prior 12 months and at 36 months for the preceding 18 months.

•Soy intake was categorized by quartile: first (≤ 5.31 g/day of soy protein or ≤ 20 mg/day of isoflavones), second (5.32 - 9.45 g/day of soy protein or 20.01 - 36.50 mg/day of isoflavones), third (9.46 - 15.31 g/day of soy protein or 36.51 - 62.68 mg/day of isoflavones), and fourth (> 15.31 g/day of soy protein or > 62.68 mg/day of isoflavones).

•4354 (88.2%) of 4934 patients completed the 36-month interview at time of study publication.

•1868 patients completed the 60-month interview, which is ongoing.

•Disease and treatment data were confirmed by review of medical charts and pathologic slides.

•Survival information for patients lost to follow-up was obtained from the Shanghai Vital Statistics Registry.

•The main outcome measures were total mortality and recurrence rates (breast cancer recurrence or breast-cancer related death).

•Analysis adjusted for age at diagnosis, TNM stage, chemotherapy, radiotherapy, type of surgery, body mass index, menopause status, estrogen and progesterone receptor status, tamoxifen use, educational level, income, cruciferous vegetable intake, total meat intake, vitamin supplement use, tea intake, and physical activity.

•Median follow-up was 3.9 years (range, 0.5 - 6.2 years).

•444 deaths occurred.

•534 breast cancer recurrences or breast cancer-related deaths occurred.

•Highest vs lowest quartile of soy protein intake was linked with lower mortality rates (hazard ratio, 0.71; 95% CI, 0.54 - 0.92).

•Adjusted 4-year mortality rates were greater for lowest vs highest quartiles of soy protein intake (10.3% vs 7.4%).

•Highest vs lowest quartile of soy protein intake was linked with lower breast cancer recurrence (hazard ratio, 0.68; 95% CI, 0.54 - 0.87).

•Adjusted 4-year breast cancer recurrence rates were greater for lowest vs highest quartiles of soy protein intake (11.2% vs 8.0%).

•The link between soy protein or isoflavone intake and mortality and recurrence followed a linear dose-response pattern until soy protein intake reached 11 g/day or soy isoflavone intake reached 40 mg/day.

•The associations of soy intake with mortality and breast cancer recurrence were similar in estrogen receptor–positive or estrogen receptor–negative breast cancer and with or without tamoxifen use.

•Study limitations included relatively short follow-up period and limited power for subanalysis of estrogen receptor and tamoxifen use.



Clinical Implications



•In women with breast cancer, higher intake of soy food is linked with a decreased risk for mortality.

•In women with breast cancer, higher intake of soy food is linked with a decreased risk for breast cancer recurrence.
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#8 Old 12-30-2009, 10:07 AM
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I think the negative effects from soy are more related to processed soy foods, like soy milk, soy yogurts, soy cheeses, veggie burgers, etc. At least that's what I've gathered from all of the conflicting research. Edamame, tempeh, and tofu are less processed and might be better options of soy.

Any processed food, soy or not, though, really should be eaten in moderation.
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#9 Old 12-30-2009, 10:23 AM
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The phytoestrogens in soybeans have the ability to mimic estrogen in that they are able to occupy the body's estrogen receptor sites, which causes estrogen in the blood stream to be eliminated by the liver. In people with estrogen-sensitive cancers, this is a good thing. What they don't know much about yet is the other ways in which phytoestrogens can mimic estrogen.



As far as processing and fermentation, these don't get rid of the phytoestrogens, they get rid of the phytates that make raw soybeans toxic to humans, so if you are unconvinced that the phytoestrogens in soy are beneficial, eating fermented or less processed soy foods isn't going to help you avoid them. Though I see no reason to fear them. They aren't going to feminize men any more than the natural estrogen already occurring in men does.

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#10 Old 12-30-2009, 10:26 AM
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Originally Posted by SomebodyElse View Post

Though I see no reason to fear them. They aren't going to feminize men any more than the natural estrogen already occurring in men does.

Speak for yourself. Soy made me gay!
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#11 Old 12-31-2009, 06:38 AM
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Originally Posted by Digger View Post

Speak for yourself. Soy made me gay!



Probably grew your boobs and shrunk your balls too.
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#12 Old 12-31-2009, 06:51 AM
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Probably grew your boobs and shrunk your balls too.

The boobs aren't coming along quite as nicely as I'd like.
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#13 Old 12-31-2009, 07:19 AM
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If soy = bigger boobs, then why isn't the Orient the bustiest region on Earth?
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#14 Old 12-31-2009, 10:29 AM
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Uh oh, I may have to retract...



http://www.usmagazine.com/celebrityn...y-milk-2009311



Quote:
"I was the guy that dabbled in soy milk, but now I've found out soy milk has enough estrogen for me to grow breasts," the Emmy winner explained. "I had to put the soy milk down. It was a very confusing time."


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#15 Old 01-03-2010, 01:22 AM
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so much information... thanks guys.



true that anything in moderation is fine.
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#16 Old 01-08-2010, 03:59 PM
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Originally Posted by SomebodyElse View Post

Uh oh, I may have to retract...



http://www.usmagazine.com/celebrityn...y-milk-2009311



I smell phony article! If he didn't have these, he didn't have man boobs http://www.prestigereviews.com/image.../manboobs3.jpg

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#17 Old 01-08-2010, 04:01 PM
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ahhh, i wish i could un-see that..
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#18 Old 01-10-2010, 07:30 AM
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just found this on Health.com.....a little easier to digest.



http://eating.health.com/2009/12/03/...out-soy-foods/

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#19 Old 01-11-2010, 11:02 AM
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Cancers are largely caused by animal fats and proteins. Along with most Western diseases.



"The China Study" is something every human should read.
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#20 Old 01-13-2010, 04:11 AM
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Interesting, I have heard this argument from a vego guy. As always too much of anything is bad, at first I thought I had to eat heaps of 'fake' meats but these days I seem to prefer legumes etc instead and only eat tofu/soy products once or twice a week.
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