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-   -   Vegan On A Budget: My Top 10 Tips! (https://www.veggieboards.com/forum/55-frugal-living/199449-vegan-budget-my-top-10-tips.html)

BiteSizeVegan 01-09-2016 11:10 AM

Vegan On A Budget: My Top 10 Tips!
 
Check out my top 10 tips for being vegan on a budget! Eating vegan doesn't have to break the bank. In fact, a vegan diet is often less expensive than one with animal products. These tips will help you spend smart and avoid blowing through your food budget.

David3 01-09-2016 12:21 PM

Can I suggest one more?

11. Shop at Asian and Hispanic markets: Beans and rice sold in huge bulk bags, for cheap. Enormous variety of vegetables and fruit, at low prices.

Also, Asian and Hispanic markets have unusual vegetables and fruit that you've never seen before.

(Below: 50-pound bags of rice at 99 Ranch Market)

https://c1.staticflickr.com/5/4021/4...d4934a1e_b.jpg


(Below: Longan fruit)

http://www.samuiholiday.com/archives...-longan-01.jpg


(Below: Martian fruit! Or maybe just rambutan):

http://cdn1.listovative.com/wp-conte...4/08/vit-c.jpg

Sadrielle 01-09-2016 03:25 PM

I love rambutan, but it's such an expensive fruit! The only fruit I have money to purchase these days is bananas.

But I have to disagree with farmer markets. Maybe it's because I live in Canada and everything is covered in snow up here, but it's far more expensive to visit the farmer market than it is to visit Superstore (which is the Canadian Walmart). Even in summer they were charging almost two thirds more for zucchini per pound than stores. About the only thing I actually got a deal on was different cucumber varieties, since at some point there was a kind elderly lady selling pickling cucumbers 25 cents each, and spanish onions. There was maybe one occasion where the apples could be bought at the same price as store apples.

BiteSizeVegan 01-10-2016 05:47 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by David3 (Post 3871201)
Can I suggest one more?

11. Shop at Asian and Hispanic markets: Beans and rice sold in huge bulk bags, for cheap. Enormous variety of vegetables and fruit, at low prices.

Also, Asian and Hispanic markets have unusual vegetables and fruit that you've never seen before.

(Below: 50-pound bags of rice at 99 Ranch Market)

https://c1.staticflickr.com/5/4021/4...d4934a1e_b.jpg


(Below: Longan fruit)

http://www.samuiholiday.com/archives...-longan-01.jpg


(Below: Martian fruit! Or maybe just rambutan):

http://cdn1.listovative.com/wp-conte...4/08/vit-c.jpg

thanks for the extra tips!

Quote:

Originally Posted by Sadrielle (Post 3871313)
I love rambutan, but it's such an expensive fruit! The only fruit I have money to purchase these days is bananas.

But I have to disagree with farmer markets. Maybe it's because I live in Canada and everything is covered in snow up here, but it's far more expensive to visit the farmer market than it is to visit Superstore (which is the Canadian Walmart). Even in summer they were charging almost two thirds more for zucchini per pound than stores. About the only thing I actually got a deal on was different cucumber varieties, since at some point there was a kind elderly lady selling pickling cucumbers 25 cents each, and spanish onions. There was maybe one occasion where the apples could be bought at the same price as store apples.

that's interesting! guess it all varies with location, which isn't surprising.

Spudulika 01-10-2016 06:40 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Sadrielle (Post 3871313)
it's far more expensive to visit the farmer market than it is to visit Superstore (which is the Canadian Walmart). Even in summer they were charging almost two thirds more for zucchini per pound than stores.

That's how it is here in the UK too. Farmer's markets are more expensive than supermarkets. Green grocers used to be the cheapest way to buy vegetables in the UK, but I rarely go to town to shop any more and green grocers (much like other traditional specialist food shops) are less commonplace than they used to be. Farmers' markets are typically more for the more affluent 'foodie' types rather than people on a low income. It may be different if you're able to strike a bargain with a seller for bulk goods.

I buy bulk wholefoods online. Some cities have wholefood stores that sell in bulk, but they're not all that common.

Another good way to save is through menu planning and batch cooking, this determines what I buy and resultantly how much I spend, probably more than anything I can think of.

Menu planning in conjunction with 1) buying bulk wholefoods, 2) going through your cupboards and planning meals around what you already have, 3) creating meals focusing on the less expensive fresh items per 1lb like bananas, roots and cabbages, plus 4) making a shopping list for the remaining things you need for your menu plan and sticking to it, all makes a huge difference.

If I'm on top of my game, this can reduce my regular weekly spend by 30% (and I'm pretty frugal anyway). It does mean I don't get nice extras like avocados, savoury snacks, sparkling fruit drinks, berries, tastier salad greens, frozen meat subs etc. Plus the food making side is more laborious and time consuming. It's worth it if you really need to save though.

no whey jose 01-11-2016 03:22 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Spudulika (Post 3871937)
That's how it is here in the UK too. Farmer's markets are more expensive than supermarkets. Green grocers used to be the cheapest way to buy vegetables in the UK, but I rarely go to town to shop any more and green grocers (much like other traditional specialist food shops) are less commonplace than they used to be. Farmers' markets are typically more for the more affluent 'foodie' types rather than people on a low income. It may be different if you're able to strike a bargain with a seller for bulk goods.

I buy bulk wholefoods online. Some cities have wholefood stores that sell in bulk, but they're not all that common.

Another good way to save is through menu planning and batch cooking, this determines what I buy and resultantly how much I spend, probably more than anything I can think of.

Menu planning in conjunction with 1) buying bulk wholefoods, 2) going through your cupboards and planning meals around what you already have, 3) creating meals focusing on the less expensive fresh items per 1lb like bananas, roots and cabbages, plus 4) making a shopping list for the remaining things you need for your menu plan and sticking to it, all makes a huge difference.

If I'm on top of my game, this can reduce my regular weekly spend by 30% (and I'm pretty frugal anyway). It does mean I don't get nice extras like avocados, savoury snacks, sparkling fruit drinks, berries, tastier salad greens, frozen meat subs etc. Plus the food making side is more laborious and time consuming. It's worth it if you really need to save though.

Here in Worthing, there's a weekly open-air market with all kinds of things for sale, including a couple of produce stands with crazy cheap fruits and veggies. Last week I got a huge bag of sweet peppers, maybe 30 peppers, for £1! I don't know if this is specific to my town or if these kinds of markets are common.

Spudulika 01-11-2016 05:01 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by no whey jose (Post 3872825)
Here in Worthing, there's a weekly open-air market with all kinds of things for sale, including a couple of produce stands with crazy cheap fruits and veggies. Last week I got a huge bag of sweet peppers, maybe 30 peppers, for £1! I don't know if this is specific to my town or if these kinds of markets are common.

Yes, the old town centre markets you get in market towns can be good value for a lot of things, though you also get a lot of bad quality toot at them too! We used to go every week when I was a child, I find they can be smaller these days than they used to be due to all the competition from budget chain stores. When I was a kid my nan usually bought her veggies from the fellas at the Saturday market, and they always flirted with the old ladies calling them "love" and "darlin'". The fruit and veg stalls you get at those kinds of markets buy their goods wholesale in the wee hours of the morning; they're not usually growers or small-holders selling their own produce or hand made goods like at farmers markets. I like farmers markets; you can get some lovely things at our local one like organic loose leaf herbal teas, hand made toiletries, and the more unusual heritage vegetables that can only be found on the high-street at Waitrose. They're just outside of my budget for regular food shopping.


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