What are your top 10 ways to save money :-) - Page 4 - VeggieBoards
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#91 Old 05-31-2014, 01:46 PM
 
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I also forgot to mention. I save money by making / growing my own herbal remedies at home or in my yard rather than seeking professional health care and/ or travelling at all. Im not saying everyone should never go to the doctor but I refuse (they might put a microchip capable of monitoring a persons thoughts and emotions in a vaccine) and it works as well or better for me and my asthma. I mostly take oat straw, turmeric, cacao, and marshmallow.
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#92 Old 06-02-2014, 07:17 PM
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Oh dear.

Beanitarian.
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#93 Old 06-02-2014, 08:16 PM
 
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wow that is some blog
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#94 Old 06-02-2014, 10:56 PM
 
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Top 10 Money Saving Tips from a vegetarian who has experienced being completely broke yet still had to pay monthly rent, weekly food, weekly gas, and yearly subscription fees.

Tip 1) You need a life purpose. If you don't have a life purpose, you're just living life day to day. If you have a life purpose like I do, which is to save the planet, save the animals, do as much good as I can and educate as many people as I can to make the right decisions in life so the planet doesn't turn into rubbish. If you have a life purpose, you will see the world in a different way, and everything that isn't part of your life purpose is just a distraction.

Tip 2) Instead of using a car, either walk to work or use a bicycle to get to work. You will probably get there much later than if you used a car, so be sure to calculate your time to arrive to work at the right time.

Tip 3) Minimize your monthly bills as much as possible. If you want to save money, cut out the cable, cut out the cell phone, cut out the landline, cut out the high speed Internet. If you want these, get the cheapest versions you can get, such as low speed Internet or whatever.

Tip 4) Save your money, if you have money, put it into the bank or store it somewhere at home. Don't spend it unless you really need to spend it. If it is something you really need to buy, then spend it. Otherwise try to save as much as possible.

Tip 5) Pay off all your debts first before saving. Don't save if you have debt bills to pay, pay off the debt that you have.

Tip 6) Time is money, that is a true statement. Don't waste a single second of your time if you want more money. Exercising is a better option than sitting down, for example. Who do you think earns more money, the fit guy or the fat guy? Who do you think has the energy, the ability, and the attractive physical qualities needed to earn more money than the other?

Tip 7) Don't buy things you don't need. I recently made this really stupid decision because I had money in the bank and felt like spreading the vegetarian message more. So I ended up ordering some $100+ Vegetarian Shoes product, which is something I didn't need, now I'm terribly missing that $100+ because I actually need it now much more than the shoes.

Tip 8) Stay focused. If you want something in life, go for it, go get it. Let all other distractions around you fade away. Everyone and everything that is not part of your life purpose is a distraction. Get them out of focus and never think about them ever again.

Tip 9) Don't make dumb decisions. If you are going to smoke a cigarette or drink alcohol or play video games all day, you are making dumb decisions that won't benefit your life in any positive long-term manner. These activities make you feel good for a few moments, but think about your past, I remember I used to play videogames for over 10 hours a day, when I think back on those memories, I can barely recall anything. Those memories were meaningless, they don't give your life any value whatsoever.

Tip 10) Take advice from people who have the results that you desire. If you like the advice that I gave, be sure to check out my Youtube channel, I will give out more advice like this.
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#95 Old 06-03-2014, 03:29 PM
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If you drink soy milk, get a soy milk maker!
I thought it was too expensive (mine was $115.), but it's also an okara maker, so you really save money.
Half cup soybeans, bought in bulk, makes about 2 quarts. You get a cup of the pulp (okara) to use in so many ways. My favorite burger is as simple as mixing the okara with an equal amount of oats, some ground flax, and a good amount of differing seasoning. Best baked, but also in a lightly oiled skillet.
Each batch costs roughly 30 cents to get both milk and the okara for the burgers. The oatmeal I get is $2.29 for a 42 oz. box.


Think of your pantry of non perishables as a bank so you can eat when your money is loooooowwwww
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#96 Old 06-04-2014, 05:47 AM
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My biggest tip would probably be to pro-rate things you spend money on regularly to see how much you can save over the course of a year by just making a few adjustments (switching to a generic brand, making dinner at home vs. going out, etc).

Perfect example...

For a long time I was getting an Egg White Delight (minus Canadian bacon of course) and a Diet Coke on my way to work each morning (4 days a week).

The Egg White Delight was $3.29 and the Diet Coke was $1.00. Multiply that times 4 days and then times 52 weeks and the total is $892.32.

A couple months ago I switched to oatmeal. 2 packages of oatmeal is 60 cents. Multiply that times 4 days and then times 52 weeks and the total is $124.80.

A savings of $767.52 per year just for changing my breakfast 4 days a week!!!

Second... I would suggest going through your bills and look for things you can eliminate or reduce. You'll usually find a few things you've forgotten about and/or realize you can live without.

Third... Sell things you no longer use and/or need. We had our first garage sale last year and I can assure you - there are people out there who will pay for ANYTHING. I think we made about $650 by selling things that would have ended up going to Goodwill anyway. As and added bonus you'll get rid of some clutter.

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Last edited by Michael; 06-04-2014 at 05:55 AM.
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#97 Old 06-10-2014, 05:22 AM
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Starbucks I only ride my bike there once a day sometimes 2x instead of four ! :what:
Laundry day 1 x a week
Shop at vintage and thrift shop
Carry my own water from home
Eat at restaurants less frequently
Shop at local farm stands for produce
Buy tj's brand soaps and shampoos vegan and low in prices compared to name brands and works as well or better ....
Shop at tj's for vegan almond milk and condiments ....
Ride bike or walk instead of buses or cabs.
Grow my own herbs and cat nip and sew toys for my cat family
I sew so I recycle and make my own clothes ....
Buy beans and brown rice, sriracha and sesame and peanut oils at Asian market
and save lots even some veggie dumplings and dipping sauce is vegan!
Buy flip flops for a $ 1 made from recycled soda pop bottles
I guess that's all I can think of now
Animals should be loved not eaten !

Last edited by lavender phase; 06-10-2014 at 05:39 AM.
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#98 Old 02-16-2015, 07:05 PM
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-Ask local gov about housing auctions.
-Get a tax ID and buy samples/wholesale at 90-80% off retail.
-Find a "reclaimed" supplier for fixtures, building supplies, etc.
-When buying new, search out merchandise that is quality and will last a long time.
-Look for discount/ overstock stores.
-Make my own dog food.
-Make my own laundry soap, which is cheap and easy.
-Make my own shirts, dresses, skirts and some pants.
-Use an ice/fan cooling system in the summer.
-Learn maintenance procedures to avoid having to fix.

Last edited by MichelleClover; 02-16-2015 at 08:37 PM.
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#99 Old 02-16-2015, 07:42 PM
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1. Make meals from scratch, at home
2. Meal plans and always shopping on a list
3. Use cloth instead of paper (if there's a disposable product, theres a cloth alternative, and yes, you get over the 'gross' factor quickly. It's better for the earth too!). In general, avoid single use/on the go/convienence items, as most cost significantly more than reusable when you keep buying them repeatedly
4. Don't buy beauty or cleaning products (I assure you, they are NOT necessary)
5. Know how to sew
6. Research online if you can do something yourself for a fraction of the cost before hiring a professional
7. Know your limitations on DIY and hire a professional on things you will likely screw up
8. Shop used
9. Write a budget and use the envelope system to stick to it
10. CASH ONLY (absolutely NO debt! If you can't afford it, you go without it, no exceptions)
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Last edited by Kiwibird08; 02-16-2015 at 07:47 PM.
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#100 Old 02-16-2015, 07:51 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by silva View Post
If you drink soy milk, get a soy milk maker!
I thought it was too expensive (mine was $115.), but it's also an okara maker, so you really save money.
Half cup soybeans, bought in bulk, makes about 2 quarts. You get a cup of the pulp (okara) to use in so many ways. My favorite burger is as simple as mixing the okara with an equal amount of oats, some ground flax, and a good amount of differing seasoning. Best baked, but also in a lightly oiled skillet.
Each batch costs roughly 30 cents to get both milk and the okara for the burgers. The oatmeal I get is $2.29 for a 42 oz. box.


Think of your pantry of non perishables as a bank so you can eat when your money is loooooowwwww
My husband has quit drinking regular milk for the fact we figured it out and we can make a gallon of organic oat milk in the soy milk maker for roughly 80cents. A gallon of organic cows milk was creeping upwards toward $6! That soy milk maker payed for itself really fast!
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#101 Old 02-17-2015, 04:49 AM
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-Eat things like lentils and dried soya, they are usually pretty cheap.
-Buy store own brand products if possible.
-Collect reward points by shopping at one or two stores only.
-Make use of student or NHS discounts.
-If you must buy non-essential stuff, buy one small thing per week maximum.
-Buy petrol/ gas from the cheaper fuel stations, prices can vary quite a lot from station to station.
-Buy things online.
-Use charity shops.
-Get phone/ Internet/ TV all together in one package.
-Make dinner and take it with you when you go out.
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#102 Old 04-12-2015, 09:46 AM
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1. Investing in essential oils and use them for meds instead. My allergies blend oils coast about $50 for three oils then the carrier oil. But it last me 4 - 6 months of using it everyday. I use oils for headache,sleeping,energy blend instead of caffeine,yoga mat cleaner cold prevention so much.
2. Food budget.we stick to $200 ever two weeks this includes all households things and cat products. For two people it's not bad but includes my vegetarian stuff and my husband's things ( he's not a vegetarian) we try to buy his meat at a local meat market. More expensive but better quality and local humane farmers.
3. Shop local
4. Keep Charlie (our cat) healthy. It's so much better to pay $100 every year on a vet visit vaccines and licensing then many vists on a over weight unhealthy cat.
5. Keep Windows open we do this a lot Nebraska has cool springs and fall and lots of wind.so we cut the air on only when it gets to hot or cold. Usually we only use heat or a.c. for about 6-7 months in the year.
6. We don't buy soda at all only a few times when we want to make drinks. I got a water bottle that has a filter in it love it. Can fill it up anywhere at work or the sink before yoga.
7. Make things from scratch. I stopped buying bread I make a loaf every week I even make buns too. I only buy it when I don't have time to make it.
8. Take advantage of coupons.
9. When it's nice out we try to cook outside.

I don't have a 10 yet.
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#103 Old 04-23-2015, 02:46 AM
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1. Rarely ever eat out, maybe five or six times a year tops if that
2. make a good bit of my food from scratch...dried beans, breads, flours (I grind my own flour from seed with my Blendtec), nut butters etc. For a while I used to make my own flaxseed milk and add Calcium/D drops but got lazy. May start doing it again as a lb of flaxseed lasted me a few months (I could make seven servings of flaxmilk with 1/4 cup flaxseed and water and add a little sweetener such as dates).
3. Grow vegetables and herbs in my garden from May to November and can/jar/freeze extras
4. I don't wear hair products or makeup at all. I use either Dr. Bronners castile liquid soap or homemade concoction of essential oils and vinegar for my hair and skin. A bottle of Dr. Bronners will last me a few months; the essential oils will last me over a year for a bottle since I dilute it when using.
5. natural cleaning solutions instead of commercial ones...lemon juice, white vinegar, washing soda, hot water
6. Ride my bike to work, to the fitness center, and errands most days from May to October, though I still drive to the grocery store once per week.
7. I wear my clothes more than once or even twice before washing them again, so that I only need to do one load of laundry two times per month (if I wash blankets and bed sheets etc it is two loads). I haul my laundry to the laundromat in a large hiking backpack and only do wash there, then hang dry clothes at home or use my home dryer if needed for blankets etc (I don't have washer at home). If I have something that really needs to be washed and worn sooner than I can get to my usual laundry schedule, I do it in the bathtub.
8. Utilize the library instead of bookstore. Yes, libraries still exist.
9. Buy the majority of my clothes at second hand stores, and buy some vegan shoes online through Amazon.com. I have gotten insanely cheap deals on organic hemp and canvas vegan shoes online (my Wicked Hemp hiking shoes were less than $37 for the shoe and for shipping/tax combined and they are still in excellent shape several years later, and my Five and Dime canvas rock climbing/mountain biking shoes were under $45). With Amazon, you can watch prices and buy when they fall for specific items. When I add an item to my wishlist, each time I check it there, it tells me if the price has fallen or risen since I saved it to my Wishlist.
10. Entertainment often involves a walk in the woods, bird watching, geocaching, cycling on trails, snowshoeing, tent camping, canoeing, curling up with a biography, or visiting Veggieboards.

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#104 Old 04-23-2015, 03:33 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Naturebound View Post
1. Rarely ever eat out, maybe five or six times a year tops if that
2. make a good bit of my food from scratch...dried beans, breads, flours (I grind my own flour from seed with my Blendtec), nut butters etc. For a while I used to make my own flaxseed milk and add Calcium/D drops but got lazy. May start doing it again as a lb of flaxseed lasted me a few months (I could make seven servings of flaxmilk with 1/4 cup flaxseed and water and add a little sweetener such as dates).
3. Grow vegetables and herbs in my garden from May to November and can/jar/freeze extras
4. I don't wear hair products or makeup at all. I use either Dr. Bronners castile liquid soap or homemade concoction of essential oils and vinegar for my hair and skin. A bottle of Dr. Bronners will last me a few months; the essential oils will last me over a year for a bottle since I dilute it when using.
5. natural cleaning solutions instead of commercial ones...lemon juice, white vinegar, washing soda, hot water
6. Ride my bike to work, to the fitness center, and errands most days from May to October, though I still drive to the grocery store once per week.
7. I wear my clothes more than once or even twice before washing them again, so that I only need to do one load of laundry two times per month (if I wash blankets and bed sheets etc it is two loads). I haul my laundry to the laundromat in a large hiking backpack and only do wash there, then hang dry clothes at home or use my home dryer if needed for blankets etc (I don't have washer at home). If I have something that really needs to be washed and worn sooner than I can get to my usual laundry schedule, I do it in the bathtub.
8. Utilize the library instead of bookstore. Yes, libraries still exist.
9. Buy the majority of my clothes at second hand stores, and buy some vegan shoes online through Amazon.com. I have gotten insanely cheap deals on organic hemp and canvas vegan shoes online (my Wicked Hemp hiking shoes were less than $37 for the shoe and for shipping/tax combined and they are still in excellent shape several years later, and my Five and Dime canvas rock climbing/mountain biking shoes were under $45). With Amazon, you can watch prices and buy when they fall for specific items. When I add an item to my wishlist, each time I check it there, it tells me if the price has fallen or risen since I saved it to my Wishlist.
10. Entertainment often involves a walk in the woods, bird watching, geocaching, cycling on trails, snowshoeing, tent camping, canoeing, curling up with a biography, or visiting Veggieboards.
Wow. You're an inspiration! I feel like such a money waster, now. I ate out twice just yesterday! I'm working on it, though...

I'm not sure that I have ten ways to save money, but I don't have a car and I think that really helps: no gas, no repairs, etc. I walk or take public transportation everywhere.
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#105 Old 04-23-2015, 06:07 AM
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That's all so great! I'm afraid I fail at books. I hate borrowing them. I need to own them. It's almost an obsession.

If I enjoy a borrowed book, I have a burning desire to get a copy on my bookshelf. I carry around lists of books I want to have. Hmm. So it seems I still have a bit of a hoarding problem.

I grew up in a hoarded house. I used to save everything. I saw it as a way to be less wasteful. In reality, I was just cluttering up my space and stressing myself out. Now I go through all the stuff I manage to collect, and twice a month I sort it: recycling, donate, and outright trash. I then take it to it's proper destination.

1. I grow veggies and can the extra. 2. I try to condense all my errands into one trip so I don't drive around as much.
3. Always turn out unused lights.
4. Hang out as much laundry as possible.
5. .. oh my, I can't think of anything else.
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#106 Old 04-23-2015, 09:16 AM
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I don't know if I have 10. I am not very good with money.

1. Open windows yearround, no air conditioning unless it is oppressive (live in Florida).
2. Use energy saving lightbulbs and turn off lights. Plug devices into an energy strip and turn that off so they don't drain power when off but plugged in.
3. Son uses a push mower, no gas mower (small yard, strong young man)
4. Husband and I share a small used car with good gas mileage.
5. Shop at thrift stores for scrubs and clothes (except shoes, I get skeeved).
6. Don't like to wear jewelry
7. Don't pay for haircuts. I do son and husband, a friend of my daughter's does ours.
8. Bring lunch to work whenever possible.
9. Always have some food around that is quick to fix so not tempted to eat restaurant food.
10. Switch shoes every other day (they last longer if they rest for 24 hours between wears.) I'm a nurse, so walk a lot and good began shoes ain't cheap.

Well there are my 10!
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#107 Old 04-24-2015, 03:19 PM
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I'm bad with money, too...intermittently so. Sometimes, when I try really hard (and hubby isn't working for a few months, ha) I can be good.

The best way for me to save money is to stay home and not go out for a few weeks...and pull the plug on the Internet!


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#108 Old 05-03-2015, 08:17 PM
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these are the main ones:

1. don't have a kid. dogs instead of kids. dogs can be vegan, too.

2. don't buy stuff you don't need.

3. if you rent, rent the cheapest possible place. if you buy, buy the cheapest possible place

4. if you need a car, buy the cheapest, most reliable one and drive it as little as possible. but it's better to walk, ride your bike, or take public transportation

5. don't get into debt, unless it's really important, and try to minimize your debt

6. hand me downs or used clothes

7. beans instead of fake meats

8. cook from scratch instead of fast food or nice restaurants

9. don't drink or smoke. what a horrible waste of money.

10. craiglist for furniture

11. conserve water and energy in your house/apt.

12. don't worry about your neighbors. they are probably in debt up to their eyeballs.
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#109 Old 05-03-2015, 08:29 PM
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I don't get how number 12 helps someone save money... unless someone is constantly giving money to their neighbours which seems unlikely.
As for number 1, I feel that it's unfair to tell people who want kids to not have them. Of course that if you can't afford to have them, you should wait until you can. But someone wanting to save some money doesn't automatically mean they can't afford to have children.
Also, if you really want to save money, have a cat or another smaller animal instead of a dog. Veterinary care for a dog is more expensive.

"We have enslaved the rest of the animal creation, and have treated our distant cousins in fur and feathers so badly that beyond doubt, if they were able to formulate a religion, they would depict the Devil in human form." - William Ralphe Inge

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#110 Old 05-04-2015, 06:47 AM
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If the neighbors have nicer stuff. that makes some people think they have to have nicer stuff, too.

The cost of raising a kid in the United States has reportedly gone up, averaging $245,340 per child.

Small dogs are cheaper than cats.

Last edited by cuberail; 05-04-2015 at 06:49 AM.
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#111 Old 08-21-2015, 11:25 AM
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Originally Posted by azerea_02 View Post
1.diva cup
2.dvd workouts instead of gym membership
3.clearly contacts.ca for my contacts
4.shopping rule: sales ONLY
5.cut my own hair
6.wash dishes by hand
7.coupons
8.deal websites such as dealfind, livingsocial, wagjag, groupon etc.
9.buy in bulk (bulk barn, costco )
10. gas card, 20c off per litre (came free with the purchase of my car and it's been darned helpful! But they sell them, so it's great gift idea)
Thanks for the tip about diva cups. I had no idea what one was, but when I read that it started a whole bunch of research leading to my buying a Ruby Cup, and now I wish I'd known about them so much sooner! Xx

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#112 Old 08-21-2015, 12:55 PM
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Stay home and stay off the computer!


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