Can You Lose A significant Amount of Weight Without Going Low Carb? - VeggieBoards
Forum Jump: 
 30Likes
Reply
 
Thread Tools
#1 Old 12-27-2014, 09:24 PM
Newbie
 
Join Date: Dec 2014
Posts: 28
Question Can You Lose A significant Amount of Weight Without Going Low Carb?

I just started my vegetarian diet yesterday and day two is just winding down.
My question is, can people lose as much weight being a vegetarian as they can doing Atkins? I don't plan on ever going back to eating meat again. I still have dairy and eggs but will eventually be limiting them quite significantly.
I feel like a high fiber, low calorie diet with enough protein and fat will help me shed pounds quickly even if it's not anything like the trendy low carb diets. I hope i am right!
If you have lost weigh going vegetarian or vegan please tell me about your own personal experiences.
DeliciousCauliflower is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
#2 Old 12-27-2014, 10:14 PM
Herbivorous Urchin
 
River's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 9,721
Simply being vegetarian does not mean you will lose weight.

If I'm not mistaken, most people that "diet" particularly fad diets like Atkins regain and then some.

The only way to actually lose weight and keep it off is to change your daily habits forever and live a healthier life, including an hour of exercise at lest 4 days a week.

If you would like to see a film for the health benefits of a plant based diet, check out "forks over knives."

But yes, many people, myself included, have reached their "ideal" weight while eating vegan/vegetarian.

Quote:
"You will always be fond of me. I represent to you all the sins you never had the courage to commit.”
Oscar Wilde, The Picture of Dorian Gray
River is offline  
#3 Old 12-28-2014, 02:34 AM
Veggie Regular
 
Tweety's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 920
Hi! Best of luck in your journey. There are a lot of testimonials out there about eating a vegetarian diet and maintaining weight loss. For example "Forks Over Knives" folks. While this is vegan mostly without dairy and eggs, these people have lost weight through plant-based eating that isn't low carb. This is just one example.

http://www.forksoverknives.com/categ...ccess-stories/
Tweety is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
#4 Old 12-28-2014, 05:32 AM
Newbie
 
Docbanana's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2014
Posts: 69
Losing weight happens because you burn more calories than you consume, causing your body to convert your stored fat to energy. Changing the source of the calories (meat, carbs, etc.) won't make you lose weight all by itself.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk HD
Docbanana is offline  
#5 Old 12-28-2014, 07:45 AM
Veggie Regular
 
Rocket's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Posts: 246
Take a look at www.drmcdougall.com.
Rocket is offline  
#6 Old 12-28-2014, 02:34 PM
Newbie
 
Join Date: Dec 2014
Posts: 28
JS

I do realize that you have to create calorie deficit in order to lose weight.
Just saying.
DeliciousCauliflower is offline  
#7 Old 12-28-2014, 04:24 PM
The Corpulent Vegan
 
Aliakai's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Seattle
Posts: 514
I've lost about 60 lbs since I went veg and the scale is still dropping every week (it's been going down since March, so about 9 months). The big thing that I did that made a difference early on was adopting a completely whole foods based approach. As much food as I could possibly make myself I did. With the exception of tortillas (which are kind of a pain in the butt to make IMO) we make almost everything from scratch from whole foods ingredients. It's a great way to lose weight, especially if you pay close attention to how much cooking oil you use when you cook.
Aliakai is offline  
#8 Old 12-28-2014, 05:38 PM
Veggie Regular
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: B.F.E but I like it ;)
Posts: 1,028
I eat a high fiber, low fat, ovo-lacto vegetarian diet. I lost a little over 60lbs, and have been maintaining that loss since July.

I prefer carb-rich foods, and I dont go heavy handed on proteins. I eat 3 meals a day, and include a serving of protien with each, and in the evening I have something small, like 5 oz of wine, or some hard candy.

I do watch my fat intake (rich foods upset my stomach) and track my calories on myfitnesspal each day.
melimomTARDIS is offline  
#9 Old 12-28-2014, 05:39 PM
Veggie Regular
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: B.F.E but I like it ;)
Posts: 1,028
added- I lost all the weight I had to lose. I currently have a BMI of 20.
melimomTARDIS is offline  
#10 Old 12-28-2014, 09:24 PM
Newbie
 
Docbanana's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2014
Posts: 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by DeliciousCauliflower View Post
I do realize that you have to create calorie deficit in order to lose weight.
Just saying.
Then I guess I don't understand the question. Atkins is a specific plan designed for weight loss and will work if followed. How quickly it works will vary by how strictly you follow it. I lost 70 pounds on it...and then gained back eventually because I didn't really want to live the rest of my life that way and ended up reverting to the eating style that got me obese in the first place. But that isn't really the diet's fault, that was me.

Vegetarian/vegan is not a weight loss plan, it is a way of eating that that doesn't include meat. What you DO include, and in what quantities, is up to you and will determine your rate of loss. If your vegetarian diet involves eating 200 calories a day of lettuce, you'll lose at a dramatic and unhealthy clip. If it involves 4000 calories of peanut butter and jelly sandwiches, pizza, Mac and cheese and a whole cake for desert....I imagine you'll gain at a pretty nice rate. So no one can tell you whether the veg diet will help you lose more, that depends on your calories. For the record, my veg diet is more healthy and moderate than either of these two options and I've lost back what I regained after Atkins and am still losing at a healthy pace. But I'm not choosing this diet for weight loss, it's for ethical reasons. I just am cutting calories right now to lose...eventually I'll maintain.

Ultimately who cares? Are you looking for a quick fix or a healthy weight loss that you can maintain by eating that way for the rest of your life? Choose the plan you can live with after the weight loss phase is over, because what's the point if you just go back to normal and regain it all again?


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk HD
River likes this.

Last edited by Docbanana; 12-28-2014 at 09:27 PM.
Docbanana is offline  
#11 Old 12-29-2014, 09:38 AM
Veggie Regular
 
etherea's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: Scotland
Posts: 263
Eat less, exercise more!
RedPill likes this.

There is joy and beauty in everything around us, just take time to see it!

etherea is offline  
#12 Old 12-29-2014, 04:52 PM
Veggie Regular
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: B.F.E but I like it ;)
Posts: 1,028
Yes to all that docbanana said. If being vegetarian guarenteed weight loss, I dont think a vegetarian diet would be recommended for people in all stages of life, like the very old, or in my case (I have two young children) the very young.

But a vegetarian diet is considered acceptable and adequate for all ages, old or young, fat or thin.

I will say that low fat carb heavy food is quite filling, for the calories (ie- minestrone soup). I add more fat to my children's portions to ensure they eat enough calories.
River, Tiger Lilly and Naturebound like this.
melimomTARDIS is offline  
#13 Old 12-30-2014, 03:15 AM
Veggie Regular
 
Tweety's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 920
Quote:
Originally Posted by Docbanana View Post
Then I guess I don't understand the question.
When choosing a diet plan there's overwhelming advice from many sources, not just Adkins to take a low carb approach, and very few advocate high carb veg*n eating. Some of these site studies that show the same amount of calories in low carb cause quicker weight loss than the same amount of calories high carb...that the all calories are created equal and all you have to do is cut calories isn't necessary true. I'm not saying I buy that, but it's out there. So I think I understand where the question is coming from.
Tweety is offline  
#14 Old 12-30-2014, 07:04 AM
Veggie Regular
 
Shallot's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: UK
Posts: 437
Quote:
Originally Posted by DeliciousCauliflower View Post
I just started my vegetarian diet yesterday and day two is just winding down.
My question is, can people lose as much weight being a vegetarian as they can doing Atkins? I don't plan on ever going back to eating meat again. I still have dairy and eggs but will eventually be limiting them quite significantly.
I feel like a high fiber, low calorie diet with enough protein and fat will help me shed pounds quickly even if it's not anything like the trendy low carb diets. I hope i am right!
If you have lost weigh going vegetarian or vegan please tell me about your own personal experiences.
I think it depends how much exercise you're doing. If you're eating a lot of carbs and exercising you will loose weight. If you're eating a lot of carbs and being quite sedentary you might not see a quick drop in weight ... unless you're limiting your calories quite severely.

Personally I eat mostly carbs - because I need fuel for my running and carb consumption is my friend (of course I mean healthy carbs I'm not chowing down on french fries & crisps).

However it runs to reason that if you replace unhealthy foods with healthy whole foods you will start to loose weight and that would be true regardless of it being a vegetarian or omnivorous diet. The main appeal (for me) of veg*nism are all the other health benefits.

Good luck with it all :-)
Ryan61 likes this.
Shallot is offline  
#15 Old 12-30-2014, 07:55 AM
Beginner
 
lightergait's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Posts: 191
Quote:
Originally Posted by DeliciousCauliflower View Post
I do realize that you have to create calorie deficit in order to lose weight.
Just saying.
I eat sometimes 3000 calories in a day of fruits, veggies and carbs when I'm not even going out that day and I'm losing weight, even when I've got a slow metabolism from a bad thyroid, so I don't think it's simply calorie deficit that makes you lose weight. I think it's the kind of calories you're putting in your body.

I follow an 80/10/10 diet - look up Freelee and others on the lifestyle through YouTube, the results are all there and I'm seeing them myself. Carbs don't make you fat, fat does. IMO, high carb low protein and fat is the way to go. There's too many people I've watched, heard of and seen that look and seem to feel amazing on this lifestyle for anyone to ridicule it. The lifestyle is also NOT to do with calorie restriction - who doesn't want to eat as much as they care for and still look a million bucks?

Last edited by lightergait; 12-30-2014 at 08:01 AM.
lightergait is offline  
#16 Old 12-30-2014, 10:27 AM
Veggie Regular
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: B.F.E but I like it ;)
Posts: 1,028
My personal macros are not 80/10/10, but 70/15/15 (so pretty close to that).... I find my food is much more filling if I eat the bulk of my calories from starchy carbs.
River, Aliakai and lightergait like this.
melimomTARDIS is offline  
#17 Old 12-30-2014, 12:11 PM
Herbivorous Urchin
 
River's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 9,721
Quote:
Originally Posted by melimomTARDIS View Post
My personal macros are not 80/10/10, but 70/15/15 (so pretty close to that).... I find my food is much more filling if I eat the bulk of my calories from starchy carbs.
I second this.
melimomTARDIS likes this.

Quote:
"You will always be fond of me. I represent to you all the sins you never had the courage to commit.”
Oscar Wilde, The Picture of Dorian Gray
River is offline  
#18 Old 12-30-2014, 01:10 PM
Newbie
 
Join Date: Dec 2014
Posts: 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by lightergait View Post
I eat sometimes 3000 calories in a day of fruits, veggies and carbs when I'm not even going out that day and I'm losing weight, even when I've got a slow metabolism from a bad thyroid, so I don't think it's simply calorie deficit that makes you lose weight. I think it's the kind of calories you're putting in your body.

I follow an 80/10/10 diet - look up Freelee and others on the lifestyle through YouTube, the results are all there and I'm seeing them myself. Carbs don't make you fat, fat does. IMO, high carb low protein and fat is the way to go. There's too many people I've watched, heard of and seen that look and seem to feel amazing on this lifestyle for anyone to ridicule it. The lifestyle is also NOT to do with calorie restriction - who doesn't want to eat as much as they care for and still look a million bucks?
Thats great! I do however try to restrict my calories along with being vegetarian and it is working wonders so far. I've already lost 6 pounds and the week isn't even over. Obviously this is probably just the initial water weight loss everybody experiences when they start a new lower calorie diet but it signifies that i'm on the right track. I am 34 years old and I doubt i can eat 3000 calories a day even if it's all healthy. You might be on to something though. Thanks for sharing!
DebBaldauf likes this.
DeliciousCauliflower is offline  
#19 Old 12-30-2014, 06:02 PM
Newbie
 
Docbanana's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2014
Posts: 69
I eat around 2000 cals a day, am active, and lose on average about 3/4th of a pound per week. I track food on myfitnesspal and activity on fitbit and my weight loss is as predicted if you assume a pound loss = 3500 cal deficit. So it is calories in, calories out in my own personal data. My macro split runs around 55/15/30 (carb/protein/fat) and am vegetarian with very little eggs/dairy (none at home, but sometimes while at social functions...I'm planning to go fully vegan this year). Mostly whole foods...whole grains, fresh fruits and veggies, almond milk, nuts, legumes, some soy, healthy fats like olive oil and avocado. My fats aren't making me fat!

Edited to add: I'm 42 years, female, 5'5' and 164 pounds. I was 267 at my heaviest and my goal (for now) is 145.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk HD
Ryan61 likes this.

Last edited by Docbanana; 12-30-2014 at 07:34 PM.
Docbanana is offline  
#20 Old 12-30-2014, 06:40 PM
Veggie Regular
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: B.F.E but I like it ;)
Posts: 1,028
Um... I dont eat 3,000 calories a day though!

I also track my calories daily myfitnesspal, and I eat 1800 calories a day regularly, and have the occasional (once/twice a month?)day when I eat more (sometimes much more) than that. I try to average 1800 over the course of a week.

I am 5'4 and 118lbs, holding steady (i like this weight).

what I find is that eating low fat vegetarian foods, I naturally dont feel the need or want to eat more than 2,000 calories in a day. When my food was higher protein/fat/meat based I needed more calories at each meal to feel sated.

Ie- two vegetarian meals, one a 500 calorie dish of mac'n'cheese (extra cheesy!) the other a 500 calorie plate of plain cooked rice. After my 500 calories of cheesy pasta, I will still need to eat to fill my belly. The quantity just isnt enough to fill me up.

After 500 calories of rice, Im thanksgiving-dinner-full. I couldnt eat more, even if I wanted to. (not that you can live on rice alone, but you get the idea, right?) and 500 calories of baked potato? HOLY CRAP.

I have heard from others that I must have a special ability to digest carbs or something, and maybe that is true. I am no doctor.

I personally never found high protein items like chicken breasts,protein bars/shakes,very filling. And those are the recommended dieter's foods.

Greasy food turns my stomach, and I dont enjoy feeling sick after eating either.

I hope this post helps!
Naturebound likes this.
melimomTARDIS is offline  
#21 Old 12-31-2014, 04:13 AM
Veggie Regular
 
Naturebound's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: Minnesota
Posts: 4,609
I think the less you weigh the less you need to maintain, but age and activity level do play a part. A 52 year old marathon runner might consume more daily calories to maintain than a 22 year old sedentary person. Conditions like hypothyroidism or disorders that make it hard to be more active like rheumatoid arthritis, and some drugs, can make weight loss or maintenance hard. Yo yo dieting for years can also screw up your metabolism and set it up so you maintain or gain on far less as you body adjusts to eating less and then the fat piles on when you eat more.

I maintain at 5'5.5" and 114 lbs (age 42 and with long term treated hypothyroidism and surgical menopause) but came from being very underweight for many years so even with exercising an hour to an hour and a half five days a week (weight lifting/calisthenics and daily cardio) plus weekend activities like hiking and so on I maintain on 1500-1800 calories per day and would gain steadily but slowly on 2000 calories a day. Going under 1500 calories I start to strain muscles. Admittedly this is probably not my natural weight but it is where I am comfortable at the moment, though it takes a lot of work for me to stay here, and I am strict about watching my nutrient intake, though also allow for treats occasionally. My theory is that I would probably maintain at 1800-2000 calories if I were twenty lbs heavier. IDK.

I also have more energy, stamina, and just feel better with a lower fat higher carb vegan diet about 70/15/15. But I try to balance fullness with satiety. I can get very full on a plateful of brown rice and beans also, but I might be hungry an hour or two later. Add in just a little bit of raw sunflower seeds or a ground almond/nutritional yeast "Parmesan" and I feel much more satiated for longer. Too much fat though, and I feel sluggish and not as well. I definitely prefer high volume to calorie dense though, but try to find a balance.
melimomTARDIS likes this.

In the end, only kindness matters. - Jewel



To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Naturebound is offline  
#22 Old 12-31-2014, 05:04 AM
Beginner
 
lightergait's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Posts: 191
Quote:
Originally Posted by DeliciousCauliflower View Post
Thats great! I do however try to restrict my calories along with being vegetarian and it is working wonders so far. I've already lost 6 pounds and the week isn't even over. Obviously this is probably just the initial water weight loss everybody experiences when they start a new lower calorie diet but it signifies that i'm on the right track. I am 34 years old and I doubt i can eat 3000 calories a day even if it's all healthy. You might be on to something though. Thanks for sharing!
Thanks! I'm not going to pretend to be a nutritionist or anything, haha! I think restricting calories can mean two things and I wonder which one you are - on one hand, simply tracking calories to make sure you dont go above something like 1500, or on the other hand eating as little as possible. The second one seems unsustainable and like torture, haha, but the first one it just something everyone does, right?!

I'm very happy for you and hope you find the vegan diet you're looking for!
lightergait is offline  
#23 Old 12-31-2014, 08:01 PM
 
CaptainNoFun's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2014
Location: Land of Cheese, USA
Posts: 31
A lot depends on your body. I'm insulin resistant and borderline diabetic. I tried everything and all diets and working out 3 hours a day and nothing worked. And by that I mean for 6 months I was working out twice a day with only 1 rest day, eating healthy, drastically changed my lifestyle and food intake and had lost a total of 5 pounds for the whole 6 months.
I was initially told by doctors to start the "ideal protein" diet which means very little carb intake. I was limited to spinach and greens and meat. I was supposed to cut out fruit, dairy, some vegetables, legumes, bread, rice and any other grains. Very restrictive. I was supposed to have only 26g of carbs per meal. I lost a lot of weight in one month but that was specific to my health issue. I also felt sick....since starting the vegan lifestyle I feel better (energy-wise and morally) and I've lost a very small amount of weight for only eating this way less than a few days. So it happens! No matter what, add exercise in your routine!
Ryan61 likes this.
CaptainNoFun is offline  
#24 Old 01-01-2015, 05:56 AM
Veggie Regular
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: B.F.E but I like it ;)
Posts: 1,028
captain no fun, have you heard of eco-atkins? Its a carb controlled vegan diet.
melimomTARDIS is offline  
#25 Old 01-01-2015, 06:36 AM
Not such a Beginner ;)
 
LedBoots's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Posts: 8,396
Quote:
Originally Posted by CaptainNoFun View Post
A lot depends on your body. I'm insulin resistant and borderline diabetic. I tried everything and all diets and working out 3 hours a day and nothing worked. And by that I mean for 6 months I was working out twice a day with only 1 rest day, eating healthy, drastically changed my lifestyle and food intake and had lost a total of 5 pounds for the whole 6 months.
I was initially told by doctors to start the "ideal protein" diet which means very little carb intake. I was limited to spinach and greens and meat. I was supposed to cut out fruit, dairy, some vegetables, legumes, bread, rice and any other grains. Very restrictive. I was supposed to have only 26g of carbs per meal. I lost a lot of weight in one month but that was specific to my health issue. I also felt sick....since starting the vegan lifestyle I feel better (energy-wise and morally) and I've lost a very small amount of weight for only eating this way less than a few days. So it happens! No matter what, add exercise in your routine!
Hi Cap'n!

There has been positive news in studies on vegan eating helping with diabetes.
Not that I'd go against ypur MD's advice, but you could present this.

"These studies suggested that meaty, fatty diets cause the body to be more resistant to insulin’s actions. Clinical research studies have shown that adopting a low-fat, plant-derived diet does indeed improve insulin sensitivity, help with weight loss, and reduce blood sugar and cholesterol.

Part of the value of a low-fat, plant-based diet is that it is very low in saturated fat—that is, the kind of fat that is found especially in meats, dairy products, and tropical oils (coconut, palm, or palm kernel oil). To cut fat effectively, you’ll want to do two things:

The first step is to avoid animal-derived products. Needless to say, this eliminates all animal fats. It does something else, too: It eliminates animal protein. While we need protein, we do not need animal-derived protein. Animal proteins accelerate kidney damage in people who have already lost some kidney function. They also increase the loss of calcium from the body (through the kidneys and into the urine), potentially increasing the risk of osteoporosis. Plant sources of protein do not present these problems.

The second step is to avoid added vegetable oils. Although oils are often thought of as healthier than animal fats, they are just as high in calories. For the healthiest diet, you will want to keep oils to a minimum. This guide covers both of these steps.

It also helps you select the most healthful carbohydrate-containing foods, and provides many other ideas for healthful foods to choose.

The way of eating explained in this guide does not require weighing or measuring, and you will never go hungry!"
http://www.pcrm.org/health/diabetes-...e-for-diabetes
Naturebound and CaptainNoFun like this.
LedBoots is offline  
#26 Old 01-01-2015, 06:18 PM
 
CaptainNoFun's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2014
Location: Land of Cheese, USA
Posts: 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by melimomTARDIS View Post
captain no fun, have you heard of eco-atkins? Its a carb controlled vegan diet.
I haven't heard of this, I'll have to look more into it...I wasn't going to have to stay on the low carb diet for long, it was until I reached "ideal body weight" and my blood work came back more normal. The biggest problem was the amount of sugar in EVERYTHING. Right now I'm working on not eating processed foods or things from boxes. The doctor said I just had to get my levels back to normal (essentially resetting my body) and then learn to eat a more balanced diet instead of all carb filled sugary foods all the time. Like unbeknownst to me, apparently eating potatoes and bread and pasta all in one meal is not okay...I have to learn to balance everything. My doctor I'm seeing now is supportive of my vegan diet and gave me a list of supplements I want to make sure to take and said we'd do some blood work in a couple of months and see where I'm at.

My biggest thing when it comes to losing weight is that you have to look at what your problem is. Because you can be vegan and eat oreos or teddy grahamns or famous amos cookies or so delicious ice cream, fried potatoes, etc and you will not lose weight. I had to find a doctor to do ridiculously thorough tests to figure out my problem. It wasn't calorie counting. I was expending more calories than I was taking in but wasn't losing weight. I would encourage anyone that is wanting to lose weight through a vegan diet to also discuss it with your doctor because there may be more to it than you know.
CaptainNoFun is offline  
#27 Old 01-06-2015, 04:00 AM
Beginner
 
RedPill's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 196
Quote:
Originally Posted by lightergait View Post
I follow an 80/10/10 diet - look up Freelee and others on the lifestyle through YouTube, the results are all there and I'm seeing them myself. Carbs don't make you fat, fat does. IMO, high carb low protein and fat is the way to go.
I wouldn't trust the 30 bananas a day woman. Her diet might work for her, but most normal people don't lead the same lifestyle and so the diet is not appropriate. Her tips on weightlifting are just plain wrong too.

Any kind of macronutrient can make you fat. Carbs can most definitely make you fat; sugar is a carb. Fat is essential for healthy body and mind because it is necessary for hormone production. In fact, scientists have recently discovered that certain fats (coconut) can effectively treat Alzheimer's.
RedPill is offline  
#28 Old 01-06-2015, 01:05 PM
Vegan as f**k
 
Go Vegan's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: Worthing, England
Posts: 2,228
If you eat healthily and exercise you will lose weight...Remember that not all veggie food is healthy! If you are sensible you will achieve all that you want to achieve
etherea likes this.
Go Vegan is offline  
#29 Old 01-06-2015, 04:04 PM
Veggie Regular
 
Tweety's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 920
For me, and this is for me only, I reject any plan that would advise me to restrict any fat, protein or carbs...or increase any of these over the other. If do feel there is an over-emphasis on protein, but a healthy body needs all three.

For me, it's just vegan variety, variety and variety.

I think we have to find what works for us. A good deal of vegan food is low calorie and nutrient dense...two good combinations there.
LedBoots, Naturebound and RedPill like this.

Last edited by Tweety; 01-06-2015 at 05:23 PM.
Tweety is offline  
#30 Old 01-07-2015, 01:52 PM
Newbie
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Posts: 41
I've lost weight on a high-carb but low-calorie diet. Not intentionally high carb, but I just eat bread as my main food.

There is no firm proof that low-carb diet is better for weight loss than any other.
http://www.nutrientsreview.com/lipids/fats.html
When you eat a lot of fat you can get sick of it so you just start to eat less - this is what I believe low-carb weight loss diet works.
Ilikecabbage is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the VeggieBoards forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
If you do not want to register, fill this field only and the name will be used as user name for your post.
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in


Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off