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#1 Old 08-08-2010, 06:56 AM
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Is it possible to eat too much healthy oils?


I eat a lot of olive oil ( I cook with it, use it in salad dressings, etc.)

I also eat flax oil in my yogurt and fruit at breakfast and have peanut on my toast.

Is that too much?
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#2 Old 08-08-2010, 08:42 AM
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I always try to use just enough to sautee, adding liquid when things start to stick.
Instead of flax oil, try grinding enough whole seeds for about a weeks worth (keep refridgerated), and add like a tablespoon to your yogurt, cereal, or smoothies.
Do you mean you add peanut oil on toast? I'd like peanut butter anyway.
I definitally think fat content should be limited.

Don't let the perfect be the enemy of the good
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#3 Old 08-08-2010, 09:16 AM
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Yes, it is entirely possible to have too many "healthy" oils in your diet. Ideally you should have no refined, extracted oils at all. When you extract something from a whole food, like in the case of oil, you lose most of the vitamins, minerals, antioxidants, and hundreds of other components found in the whole food and are left with nothing but fat. I'm not saying fat is bad by any means, just that the majority, if not all of your fat intake should come from whole foods. I wouldn't advise anyone cook with oils at all (no matter what oil you use, it will degrade to some degree to form toxic compounds, but that's another topic), but especially not with olive oil. If you're cooking with any oil at all, I would recommend virgin, unrefined coconut oil under low heat. It sounds like you use a lot of extracted oils in your diet, so try replacing them with whole foods. You'll still get the oil content, but also the whole nutrients of the whole food. Try adding sliced up avocado to your salad instead of olive oil. Instead of flax oil in your yogurt, grind up whole flax seeds. Buy the seeds whole, grind a week's worth in a coffee grinder, and always, always store the ground flax in the freezer. Instead of peanut oil on your toast, try non-hydrogenated peanut butter (the kind you have to stir). Or better yet, try whole peanuts.

The point isn't to eliminate the fat, just to eliminate the amount of refined fat in your diet.
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#4 Old 08-16-2010, 08:58 AM
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well, I have pretty strong opinions on oils vs. fats, so I came to read this thread to see if I could add anything but I think SkyDog & I share a common brain because the last 2 topics I've gone to, he has posted thoughts that very well could have once existed in mine. And same for this topic...

Minimal thoughts I can add:
Avocado can make a nice dressing by blending rather than just sliced in the salad.
Olives are fantastic in salads as well, in place of olive oil
It is definitely possible to have too much oil, as Skydog said, and also possible to have too much fat in proportion to the rest of your diet.
When you do use oil for cooking, the purpose is to coat the FOOD - NOT the pan! There is no need to swirl the oil around the pan unless you're making pancakes or omeletes or something. All it does is expose the oil to more heat and makes it break down into toxic nastiness faster. When you are sauteeing vegetables, heat the pan, add a small amount of oil (I use 1 tsp or less) just before adding the veggies and then immediately stir them around to coat them in the oil and get the oil off the direct heat.

I do use flax oil, since it can be difficult for our digestive systems to break down the seeds, even when they are ground. I am careful to buy unrefined, virgin, cold-pressed, in an opaque bottle and in a store that keeps it refrigerated - and then I refrigerate it at home. I also buy the smallest bottle, even though it costs more, to keep it as fresh as possible.

I also use a small amount of olive oil when cooking. I agree that coconut oil is better, but olive is mostly monounsaturated fats which are still fairly stable at high temp. Also, since olive oil has been used for centuries in Europe without any major health implications I feel ok about it. I also use sesame oil, which although more polyunsatured than would normally work has an antioxidant that helps protect it from breaking down in heat. Sesame oil has also been used for centuries in Asia safely. I'd be interested to hear your thoughts on those 2 oils in more detail SkyDog!

Feel free to check out my videos on how to make healthy and delicious vegan meals at www.HealthyVeganRecipes.net
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#5 Old 08-19-2010, 09:06 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by healthyvegan View Post

well, I have pretty strong opinions on oils vs. fats, so I came to read this thread to see if I could add anything but I think SkyDog & I share a common brain because the last 2 topics I've gone to, he has posted thoughts that very well could have once existed in mine. And same for this topic...

Minimal thoughts I can add:
Avocado can make a nice dressing by blending rather than just sliced in the salad.
Olives are fantastic in salads as well, in place of olive oil
It is definitely possible to have too much oil, as Skydog said, and also possible to have too much fat in proportion to the rest of your diet.
When you do use oil for cooking, the purpose is to coat the FOOD - NOT the pan! There is no need to swirl the oil around the pan unless you're making pancakes or omeletes or something. All it does is expose the oil to more heat and makes it break down into toxic nastiness faster. When you are sauteeing vegetables, heat the pan, add a small amount of oil (I use 1 tsp or less) just before adding the veggies and then immediately stir them around to coat them in the oil and get the oil off the direct heat.

I do use flax oil, since it can be difficult for our digestive systems to break down the seeds, even when they are ground. I am careful to buy unrefined, virgin, cold-pressed, in an opaque bottle and in a store that keeps it refrigerated - and then I refrigerate it at home. I also buy the smallest bottle, even though it costs more, to keep it as fresh as possible.

I also use a small amount of olive oil when cooking. I agree that coconut oil is better, but olive is mostly monounsaturated fats which are still fairly stable at high temp. Also, since olive oil has been used for centuries in Europe without any major health implications I feel ok about it. I also use sesame oil, which although more polyunsatured than would normally work has an antioxidant that helps protect it from breaking down in heat. Sesame oil has also been used for centuries in Asia safely. I'd be interested to hear your thoughts on those 2 oils in more detail SkyDog!

Haha well it's cool to see someone who has similar thoughts to me! I'm passionate about health through nutrition, so these kind of things are always important to me.


I used to always cook with olive oil. I agree that as far as refined foods go, olive oil does have a healthy balance of fats, it being mostly monunsaturated. And well, I do have to admit, it's hard to surpass the smell of some garlic and onions cooking in olive oil. I always kept it under low heat too, I was always really careful of that. But as I got to reading more and more, I learned that olive oil is a really delicate oil, not the best for cooking. (http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=movie&dbid=6) After that, I switched over to cooking with refined avocado oil, which is much more stable under heat. But as I read more and more about cooking with oils in general, I couldn't escape the fact that bad things happen, at least to a small degree, when you heat any oil. It was a really inconvenient truth, I cooked with oil almost every single day. But I changed my food prep and eventually quit cooking with oils all together. If people do choose to cook with oil though, I still recommend unrefined virgin coconut oil under low heat, refined avocado oil, or refined high oleic safflower or high oleic sunflower oil. Like you said though, people in Europe have been cooking with olive oil for some time without any noticeable negative effects. But I think that's mostly due to a lot of areas in Europe where people's diets are mostly focused on fruits and vegetables, and not as much meat. So while that may even it out a bit, if I can help it, I like to avoid anything that could possibly cause harm.

And I don't know too much about sesame oil for cooking, but I heard as well that it's better for cooking because of the antioxidants in it, regardless of its mostly polyunsaturated fats. I also read that an antioxidant in sesame oil, sesamol, prevents oxidation and has other health benefits for the body. But either way, I think the best way to get the benefits of any oil is through the whole foods. Thanks for sharing your interest, healthyvegan!
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#6 Old 08-19-2010, 09:17 AM
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Agree 100% with Skydog and also a couple other points:

Fats are not a sustainable source of energy; carbohydrates are.

Using oils and other high-fat foods like soy, peanuts, and nuts/seeds increases our percentage of calories from fat very quickly. Think of a spinach salad, lots of spinach leaves, 10 cups worth, well, 14% of the 69 calories in the spinach already came from fat (good, whole food fats). Add oil, "just a tad," 1 T. and you have 120 calories coming from fat for your 190 calorie meal = 68% of calories from fat with the oil added.

People who eat refined foods like oils mess up their fatty acid ratios (you know the ones who scramble to take a supplement?), whereas whole foods, especially fruits and greens, have good fatty acid ratios for our bodies.

Fats are addictive, so using "just a little bit" sometimes leads to more, etc.
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