The Health at Every Size Pledge - VeggieBoards
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#1 Old 03-07-2010, 06:23 AM
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Health at Every Size is based on the simple premise that the best way to improve health is to honor your body. It supports people in adopting health habits for the sake of health and well-being (rather than weight control). Health at Every Size encourages:



* Accepting and respecting the natural diversity of body sizes and shapes.

* Eating in a flexible manner that values pleasure and honors internal cues of hunger, satiety, and appetite.

* Finding the joy in moving ones body and becoming more physically vital.



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Few of us are at peace with our bodies, whether because were fat or because we fear becoming fat.



Health at Every Size is the new peace movement.



Very simply, it acknowledges that good health can best be realized independent from considerations of size. It supports peopleof all sizesin addressing health directly by adopting healthy behaviors.



More HAES resources:



Health at Every Size (book)



Linda Bacon's website



Jon Robinson's HAES page



Take the pledge with me!
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#2 Old 03-07-2010, 05:58 PM
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sorry, I can't jump on her bandwagon. I am not going to buy her book just to read what she says, but there has been a little research I've seen that did say something about being a "little" overweight can help protect against xyz......whatever it was...it was awhile ago. Is this Dr overweight by chance?



The fact of the matter is, more health care dollars are spent each year on obesity related illnesses than any other disease, which heart disease, diabetes, and HTN are all inteconnected with. I'm in the health care world, and I directly see the effects of HTN and diabetes on the dialysis unit I work on....you'd never see me tell a pt, it's ok if you're overweight....the world just has to get over it...



Good luck on losing weight......I've done it on my own....it is possible. People have to change the way they look at food, the types of foods they consume, and HOW much of it they eat......our wonderful illustrious American diet is killing everyone slowly!

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#3 Old 03-07-2010, 08:58 PM
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At the risk of offending someone, I somewhat agree with photojess. Most people who are obese aren't healthy. Most people become that size because they don't take care of themselves. Note I say most, as there are exceptions to everything. I very much support loving your body and recongizing the many shapes and sizes people come in, so on that I agree with the OP. But I think many people will take "loving your body as it is" to mean not working to make it better. I love my body, and part of that is recognizing where it can or ought to be improved so I can treat it well and have it be vibrant and healthy.
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#4 Old 03-07-2010, 09:08 PM
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I also agree with the posters above. I was larger at one point myself, and I lost the weight (and am still trying to lose). I know that I feel healthier now for having lost it, and thus won't support something that basically says a 300lb woman is 'just built that way.'



I like the focus on healthy eating, I have found that is what has really helped me, rather than going on a fad diets, but your joints, heart, etc would definately disagree about a large amount of excess body weight being 'okay.'
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#5 Old 03-07-2010, 09:52 PM
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Originally Posted by beatricious View Post

http://haescommunity.org/index.php



Health at Every Size is based on the simple premise that the best way to improve health is to honor your body. It supports people in adopting health habits for the sake of health and well-being (rather than weight control). Health at Every Size encourages:



* Accepting and respecting the natural diversity of body sizes and shapes.

* Eating in a flexible manner that values pleasure and honors internal cues of hunger, satiety, and appetite.

* Finding the joy in moving one’s body and becoming more physically vital.

I completely support these sentiments, and am trying to figure out how supporting them is equal to cheering someone on to bad health. I don't see where learning to love and appreciate the body you have RIGHT NOW means that you don't give crap enough about yourself to be in perfect, or good, shape. (And how fit, how healthy, how slender do you have to be, anyway? Enough not to be sick, or enough to fit on some chart?)



The problem with not accepting people, or not supporting people in accepting their bodies, is that it leads to all this judgment and discrimination against fat people. I don't care if I have to pay a few more dollars in taxes to support health care for the obese. I care as much about that as I want to get into the business of somebody thinking they need a sex change. It's not my business. I care way more about WHY so many more people are obese these days. The "they're just greedy and lazy" does not fly. Instead of criticizing the growing number of obese people and making them feel unworthy, why not put all that energy into something else?



BTW, I come in at less than 110, so I hope nobody wishes me well in losing weight.



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The fact of the matter is, more health care dollars are spent each year on obesity related illnesses than any other disease, which heart disease, diabetes, and HTN are all inteconnected with. I'm in the health care world, and I directly see the effects of HTN and diabetes on the dialysis unit I work on....you'd never see me tell a pt, it's ok if you're overweight....the world just has to get over it...

I'm not in the healthcare field, but any way I read this (albeit from my limited experience), I am reminded that I have seen enough slender people with these "obesity related diseases" to find it misleading. I've no doubt that obese people are, on the whole, less physically fit than slender people. When there are numbers to support the percentage of who became diseased specifically from obesity (but would not have otherwise), then we will have a better picture of just how unhealthy it is to be obese.



Also, I don't believe the blurb above is telling anyone to tell people it is "ok" to be obese. I think the point is that their bodies are their responsibility, and they need to accept them and love them in order to care well for them. That was my take on what I read in that quote. I haven't read the book and don't plan to.

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#6 Old 03-08-2010, 04:16 AM
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This isn't a thread to debate the health or unhealth of being overweight or obese. Health at Every Size is about making healthy lifestyle changes with the goal of improving health, rather than changing your weight. In other words, Health at Every Size recognizes that lifestyle choices such as eating more vegetables, getting more exercise, or whatever, are valuable in and of themselves, whether or not they lead to weight loss. Too often, I see people say things like "I was at the gym every day this week and I've been eating so healthy, so why haven't I lost weight?" The truth is that going to the gym regularly and eating healthfully are great all by themselves! Improved health is possible independent of weight loss. Perhaps more importantly, improving your health is much, much easier when you accept and respect the body you have right now. People who feel bad about themselves are less likely to take good care of themselves. I'm not really sure why people are so against the notion of someone feeling good about themselves and taking steps to be healthier, even if they are overweight or obese.



I intended this as a support thread for people who want to follow HAES or want to learn more about it. If you disagree with the tenets of HAES, please stay out of the thread and/or start a debate in the Compost Heap. Thanks.



Quote:
Good luck on losing weight....



Are you talking to me, photojess? If so, then this is a bad comment and you should feel bad. It's very rude to wish someone good luck on losing weight if they haven't made it clear that they're trying to. (And in fact, I think I made it very clear that I'm not trying to lose weight, since I follow Health at Every Size.)



Quote:
Also, I don't believe the blurb above is telling anyone to tell people it is "ok" to be obese. I think the point is that their bodies are their responsibility, and they need to accept them and love them in order to care well for them. That was my take on what I read in that quote. I haven't read the book and don't plan to.



You got it exactly right, veggily.
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#7 Old 03-08-2010, 04:35 AM
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Anywho, just to get the support thread/safe space ball rolling...I've started walking to work a couple of days a week instead of taking the subway (I live about an hour away). It's great for "becoming more physically vital." I really love being able to listen to my music and people-watch and see the city wake up. It's so enjoyable that I don't even notice I'm getting exercise, too! It also gives me more energy all day, and totally beats being stuck in an overcrowded subway car with 10,000 hostile strangers.
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#8 Old 03-08-2010, 04:38 AM
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Originally Posted by beatricious View Post

This isn't a thread to debate the health or unhealth of being overweight or obese. Health at Every Size is about making healthy lifestyle changes with the goal of improving health, rather than changing your weight. In other words, Health at Every Size recognizes that lifestyle choices such as eating more vegetables, getting more exercise, or whatever, are valuable in and of themselves, whether or not they lead to weight loss. Too often, I see people say things like "I was at the gym every day this week and I've been eating so healthy, so why haven't I lost weight?" The truth is that going to the gym regularly and eating healthfully are great all by themselves! Improved health is possible independent of weight loss. Perhaps more importantly, improving your health is much, much easier when you accept and respect the body you have right now. People who feel bad about themselves are less likely to take good care of themselves. I'm not really sure why people are so against the notion of someone feeling good about themselves and taking steps to be healthier, even if they are overweight or obese.

I don't know if I gave you that impression, because it wasn't my intent.



I DO agree with the tenants of HAES. The problem is that a lot of people take things like this to mean not implementing changes - they see it as "I love my body for what it is, so I'm not going to start changing my poor habits because that would affect who I am right now." And I don't mean simply people who are overweight; that can include people of all sizes. For example, I AM trying to get a little slimmer - but I'm doing it for the health benefits of building muscle and lowering my body fat percentage. I don't really care how much I weigh, and honestly I'm not even sure why I bother to track it.



I think, actually, my feelings correspond pretty much to the point of HAES. I just get worried when I hear things like this because no matter how well intentioned it is, someone will take it to mean acceptance without betterment is the best. I think we should always be trying to make ourselves better (in this case, implementing healthy habits), even if we accept our shortcomings or situations.
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#9 Old 03-08-2010, 05:59 AM
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I agree somewhat with what she says, but not enough to justify the buying of her book.





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If so, then this is a bad comment and you should feel bad.)



haha.



Good job on telling other what to think.

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#10 Old 03-08-2010, 06:20 AM
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haha.



Good job on telling other what to think.



How am I telling others what to think? I'm not trying to lose weight (even a minimal scanning of any of the materials I linked to should make it obvious that HAES is not about weight loss), and photojess has no idea how much I weigh in the first place. For all she knows, I could be 100 pounds soaking wet, or I could be recovering from an eating disorder. It was a rude comment that deserved to be called out.
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#11 Old 03-08-2010, 06:32 AM
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Beatricious, did you see this?



And I agree with you. I truely believe that some people are meant to be larger, and some are meant to be smaller. Just like some people are tall, some are short.

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#12 Old 03-08-2010, 07:37 AM
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Originally Posted by beatricious View Post

How am I telling others what to think? I'm not trying to lose weight (even a minimal scanning of any of the materials I linked to should make it obvious that HAES is not about weight loss), and photojess has no idea how much I weigh in the first place. For all she knows, I could be 100 pounds soaking wet, or I could be recovering from an eating disorder. It was a rude comment that deserved to be called out.



Separated that quote in order to clarify that I did not address the weight question, but rather the fact that you told her "to feel bad".

"Hell exists not to punish sinners, but to ensure that nobody sins in the first place."
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#13 Old 03-08-2010, 08:18 AM
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Separated that quote in order to clarify that I did not address the weight question, but rather the fact that you told her "to feel bad".



"This [post/comment] is bad and you should feel bad" is a meme used frequently on Livejournal. It's not really intended seriously. Her comment was bad, but she should feel however she feels about that.
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#14 Old 03-08-2010, 08:23 AM
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Originally Posted by Kibbleforlola View Post

Beatricious, did you see this?



Interesting! Thanks. I haven't seen that theory before.



Quote:
I don't know if I gave you that impression, because it wasn't my intent.



I DO agree with the tenants of HAES. The problem is that a lot of people take things like this to mean not implementing changes - they see it as "I love my body for what it is, so I'm not going to start changing my poor habits because that would affect who I am right now." And I don't mean simply people who are overweight; that can include people of all sizes. For example, I AM trying to get a little slimmer - but I'm doing it for the health benefits of building muscle and lowering my body fat percentage. I don't really care how much I weigh, and honestly I'm not even sure why I bother to track it.



I think, actually, my feelings correspond pretty much to the point of HAES. I just get worried when I hear things like this because no matter how well intentioned it is, someone will take it to mean acceptance without betterment is the best. I think we should always be trying to make ourselves better (in this case, implementing healthy habits), even if we accept our shortcomings or situations.



This is a common criticism of HAES, but I actually find that it has the opposite effect. People who start eating healthier and being more active, with the goal of weight loss, might find that they don't lose weight; so they quit, because, "what's the point?" With HAES, those healthy changes are the point. It encourages you to see eating healthier and being more active as valuable goals in and of themselves, and you're more likely to stick with them because you're not expecting a dramatic related result. For me, I exercise regularly and eat generally nutritious foods because I feel good when I do and bad when I don't. That's it. That's the whole point. It's incredibly liberating.
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#15 Old 03-08-2010, 08:39 AM
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This is a common criticism of HAES, but I actually find that it has the opposite effect. People who start eating healthier and being more active, with the goal of weight loss, might find that they don't lose weight; so they quit, because, "what's the point?" With HAES, those healthy changes are the point. It encourages you to see eating healthier and being more active as valuable goals in and of themselves, and you're more likely to stick with them because you're not expecting a dramatic related result. For me, I exercise regularly and eat generally nutritious foods because I feel good when I do and bad when I don't. That's it. That's the whole point. It's incredibly liberating.



I agree. Now don't get me wrong, I have my own issues with Kate Harding, but I actually think her HAES stuff is alright. In my personal experience, the more I've tried to actively manage my weight (dieting, regimented eating, etc), the more my self-esteem would take a hit when I'd inevitably fail. I'd maybe be 5 pounds lighter after a month using Slim-Fast shakes, but feel fatter than ever before. I just can't deal with constantly obsessing over my weight and what I eat, which is what happens when I'm on a "diet." It just takes too much out of me, emotionally.



My transition to veganism has had 100% to do with ethics and 0% to do with my weight. Oddly enough, the excess weight I've been carrying around has been literally melting off. I'm not perfect - I still weigh myself regularly and I will stress over a weight increase but I don't beat myself up as much as I used to. I feel healthier, which is a better feeling than the kind of "thin" I'd feel after a month of crazily restrictive eating on some random program.



Just like everything else, there are extremes in HAES. Could there be a healthy 300 pound woman? I guess, but they're extremely uncommon. Yes, there are probably individuals who use the HAES philosophy to cover a binge-eating disorder or a simple unwillingess to exercise (or anorexia/bulimia on the other end of the "every size" spectrum). But most people DO fall in the middle, and it's OK for them to feel good about themselves! A 5'6", 170 pound woman is not in ANY danger of dying from an obesity related illness - but she is considered "heavy" according to a western cultural notion of beauty and health. If this woman can look at herself in the mirror and say "I'm good, I'm healthy", then HAES has served its intended purpose.
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#16 Old 03-08-2010, 08:47 AM
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Are you talking to me, photojess? If so, then this is a bad comment and you should feel bad. It's very rude to wish someone good luck on losing weight if they haven't made it clear that they're trying to. (And in fact, I think I made it very clear that I'm not trying to lose weight, since I follow Health at Every Size.)



You posted in the 'dietary and weight issues' forum, so you can't blame her for presuming that. Her intentions were well-meaning I am sure. I wouldn't take offence personally.
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#17 Old 03-08-2010, 08:57 AM
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"This [post/comment] is bad and you should feel bad" is a meme used frequently on Livejournal. It's not really intended seriously. Her comment was bad, but she should feel however she feels about that.



Well, I never hang around LJ, but I get your point.

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#18 Old 03-08-2010, 09:43 AM
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You posted in the 'dietary and weight issues' forum, so you can't blame her for presuming that. Her intentions were well-meaning I am sure. I wouldn't take offence personally.



I wasn't sure whether or not to put this in Weight Issues or General Health, but since Health at Every Size is partly about, well, size, it seems to fit more here (and the forum is weight issues, not weight loss). But if the consensus is that it fits better in GH, I can ask a mod to move it.



Well-intentioned or not, I think the comment was in very poor taste. I know photojess wasn't intending to be rude, because she seems like a nice person, but surely we can agree that it's best to never assume that someone is trying to lose weight, unless they say so explicitly. You risk hurting someone's feelings or triggering an eating disorder. Or a punch in the face.
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#19 Old 03-08-2010, 12:46 PM
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This is a very interesting thread. I recently (3 days ago) rejoined weight watchers (for the 5th time I think) and already I've failed, I'm due on my period and ate a load of rubbish for dinner tonight despite such a good start to the day, also I had some wine and stuff over the weekend. Although I had all good intentions when I started these have already fallen by the wayside. I am feeling very guilty and I feel like a failure and so the vicious circle starts again. If only I could focus on health and wellbeing and doing things for myself because its pleasurable and makes me feel good but instead I concentrate on weight and how much I will love myself when I lose that weight and look acceptable, I put on hold my self esteem and tell myself I don't deserve it until I've made those changes and 'disciplined' myself enough to be acceptable. I live in a place which does not exist.



I was slim when I was younger, I was anorexic, I was miserable and I still hated myself.



Anyway my point is (sorry to digress) I think the ideas behind HAES move the focus from weight obsession to the joy of doing things for yourself, loving yourself and living life right now, forgetting about this ridiculous ideal and quest for size zero. It teaches acceptance of what and who you are right now without the conditions. Although I agree that one cannot move forward without progression and bettering oneself, the idea that you cannot accept yourself without the attached conditions (when I'm thin, drink less, do more exercise) will not bring peace and in turn will not give anyone the confidence or self worth in order to better themselves. It is in the present that we are truly alive not 6 months down the line when we have lost all that weight.



Loving oneself whatever your current situation can only be a good thing, surely? I'm sure that even if people do look at HAES and think 'Hmm I can love myself as I am, I don't have to change anything' then at least thats a start, any step towards loving and caring for oneself is a step further, a progression to bettering oneself. I certainly wish I could even get to that point. I'll definitely try and read more on this, clearly what I've been doing isn't working so why not try something new!



I hope this makes sense, I'm not the best at getting my thoughts communicated
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#20 Old 03-08-2010, 12:54 PM
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Originally Posted by beatricious View Post

http://haescommunity.org/index.php







More HAES resources:



Health at Every Size (book)



Linda Bacon's website



Jon Robinson's HAES page



Take the pledge with me!



I've signed the pledge yay!
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#21 Old 03-08-2010, 01:05 PM
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Beanz, have you ever noticed that you always seem to find something once you stop looking for it?



I think it's for this same reason that a HAES philosophy could unintentionally lead to weight loss in overweight individuals. If someone were to ultimately embrace HAES and look at their food choices solely in terms of overall nutrition rather than fat/calories/carbs, then they'd be less likely to say "Screw it, I'm eating cheese fries for lunch" just because they had a fattening breakfast. They're not going out for a walk or a jog because they want to lose weight - they do it because it feels good and it's good for their body. I believe the biological motivation to achieve overall health is much stronger than the biological motivation to simply "lose weight." We need to be healthy to function, we don't necessarily need to be thin to function. And besides, I like the idea of HAES because it's moderate. It's about choices over time, not choices over a day or week.
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#22 Old 03-08-2010, 01:09 PM
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Beanz, have you ever noticed that you always seem to find something once you stop looking for it?



I think it's for this same reason that a HAES philosophy could unintentionally lead to weight loss in overweight individuals. If someone were to ultimately embrace HAES and look at their food choices solely in terms of overall nutrition rather than fat/calories/carbs, then they'd be less likely to say "Screw it, I'm eating cheese fries for lunch" just because they had a fattening breakfast. They're not going out for a walk or a jog because they want to lose weight - they do it because it feels good and it's good for their body. I believe the biological motivation to achieve overall health is much stronger than the biological motivation to simply "lose weight." We need to be healthy to function, we don't necessarily need to be thin to function. And besides, I like the idea of HAES because it's moderate. It's about choices over time, not choices over a day or week.



I agree completely
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#23 Old 03-08-2010, 07:35 PM
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This is a very interesting thread. I recently (3 days ago) rejoined weight watchers (for the 5th time I think) and already I've failed, I'm due on my period and ate a load of rubbish for dinner tonight despite such a good start to the day, also I had some wine and stuff over the weekend. Although I had all good intentions when I started these have already fallen by the wayside. I am feeling very guilty and I feel like a failure and so the vicious circle starts again. If only I could focus on health and wellbeing and doing things for myself because its pleasurable and makes me feel good but instead I concentrate on weight and how much I will love myself when I lose that weight and look acceptable, I put on hold my self esteem and tell myself I don't deserve it until I've made those changes and 'disciplined' myself enough to be acceptable. I live in a place which does not exist.



I was slim when I was younger, I was anorexic, I was miserable and I still hated myself.



Anyway my point is (sorry to digress) I think the ideas behind HAES move the focus from weight obsession to the joy of doing things for yourself, loving yourself and living life right now, forgetting about this ridiculous ideal and quest for size zero. It teaches acceptance of what and who you are right now without the conditions. Although I agree that one cannot move forward without progression and bettering oneself, the idea that you cannot accept yourself without the attached conditions (when I'm thin, drink less, do more exercise) will not bring peace and in turn will not give anyone the confidence or self worth in order to better themselves. It is in the present that we are truly alive not 6 months down the line when we have lost all that weight.



Loving oneself whatever your current situation can only be a good thing, surely? I'm sure that even if people do look at HAES and think 'Hmm I can love myself as I am, I don't have to change anything' then at least thats a start, any step towards loving and caring for oneself is a step further, a progression to bettering oneself. I certainly wish I could even get to that point. I'll definitely try and read more on this, clearly what I've been doing isn't working so why not try something new!



I hope this makes sense, I'm not the best at getting my thoughts communicated



Great post, and I'm glad you signed the pledge!



I think your point about putting things off until "when you're thin" is a really good one. (Kate Harding has a good post on this, called "The Fantasy of Being Thin": http://kateharding.net/2007/11/27/th...of-being-thin/) I think it's easy to blame any unhappiness with your current situation on your weight - I know I've fallen into that trap before. "I'll start loving my body when I'm thin," "I'll buy that cute dress when I'm thin," etc. etc. You really do need to give yourself license to live and be happy right now, which is much easier said than done after a lifetime of being told that being thin is good and being anything else is bad, bad, bad.



I actually had a small-scale experience lately that really opened up my eyes to this. I really like the "hipster" look - skinny black jeans, stripey t-shirts, faux leather jackets, etc. So I tried to buy clothes in that style, but I couldn't find anything that looked good on me, and I blamed my body for not fitting into that hipster mold. I was feeling really low after a couple of failed shopping expeditions. And then it hit me that those clothes just don't look good on me, and they never will. And that's ok! I look great in dresses with empire waists, and in classy belted cardigans. That's my body. I have the right to dress the body I have now in clothes that make me feel happy and confident. (Not to say that there aren't plenty of ways for large ladies to rock the hipster look, of course.)
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#24 Old 03-09-2010, 01:02 AM
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This is a common criticism of HAES, but I actually find that it has the opposite effect. People who start eating healthier and being more active, with the goal of weight loss, might find that they don't lose weight; so they quit, because, "what's the point?" With HAES, those healthy changes are the point. It encourages you to see eating healthier and being more active as valuable goals in and of themselves, and you're more likely to stick with them because you're not expecting a dramatic related result. For me, I exercise regularly and eat generally nutritious foods because I feel good when I do and bad when I don't. That's it. That's the whole point. It's incredibly liberating.

You're definitely right. I agree with the ideals of HAES. Again, I just worry because a lot of people will misconstrue them into something else. But people who follow the tenants of it, instead of using it to hide other things, of course I think is great.

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A 5'6", 170 pound woman is not in ANY danger of dying from an obesity related illness - but she is considered "heavy" according to a western cultural notion of beauty and health.

Just wanted to point out that this isn't necessarily true. The illnesses we think of as related to obesity can strike anyone. But otherwise I agree with you.
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#25 Old 03-09-2010, 05:24 AM
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Originally Posted by Clarita Osita View Post


Just wanted to point out that this isn't necessarily true. The illnesses we think of as related to obesity can strike anyone. But otherwise I agree with you.



Yes - you're right. Heart disease, high cholesterol, etc. can strike anyone. But if a my hypothetical 5'6" 170lbs woman were to develop one of those ailments, her doctors couldn't attribute that to her weight. The stronger risk factor would have been something like family history, or smoking, or what have you. Even though her weight wasn't the cause of her problems, that woman would still be considered "fat" by most everyone's standards (unless she was a Serena Williams-type built athelete or something!)
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#26 Old 03-10-2010, 01:53 PM
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I've been trying different ways of moving lately, instead of getting stuck in a "gym rut." I find that the treadmill, elliptical etc. makes me focus on numbers too much, what with the big red digital timer and the gross calorie counter. I went to spin class today with my coworker. Phoof! Lots of fun. Now I need to go home and lie down.
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#27 Old 03-11-2010, 12:41 PM
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I've been trying different ways of moving lately, instead of getting stuck in a "gym rut."



Sounds good. I just try to get off my ass more often. I get a lot more enjoyment out of going for a walk and taking pictures than doing an exercise video, but they can easily burn the same number of calories.

You're gonna make me puke my pants.
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#28 Old 03-12-2010, 04:11 AM
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Ugh. Here's a really gross piece in Canada's National Post about exercise and weight loss: http://www.nationalpost.com/rss/story.html?id=2655554



Not only is it riddled with fatphobic stereotypes ("most obese people hate exercise"...I'd love to see the study they're referencing for that one), but it essentially assumes that any healthy activity is useless unless it makes you lose weight. Isn't exercise, like, massively beneficial? For all kinds of reasons? But instead, they frame exercise as a way to "compensate" for food. What better way to make exercise seem like punishment instead of fun?
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#29 Old 03-12-2010, 05:39 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by beatricious View Post

Ugh. Here's a really gross piece in Canada's National Post about exercise and weight loss: http://www.nationalpost.com/rss/story.html?id=2655554



Not only is it riddled with fatphobic stereotypes ("most obese people hate exercise"...I'd love to see the study they're referencing for that one), but it essentially assumes that any healthy activity is useless unless it makes you lose weight. Isn't exercise, like, massively beneficial? For all kinds of reasons? But instead, they frame exercise as a way to "compensate" for food. What better way to make exercise seem like punishment instead of fun?



Yes times one million. The fastest way to get sick of exercise is to force yourself to do it for the sole purpose of weight loss. What happens is people looking to lose weight will start an overly ambitious exercise program and push themselves too hard, all so they can burn more calories in a faster timeframe. Of course, this isn't really sustainable or fun, so eventually they burn out and give up on exercise entirely.



People should just get out and have fun while trying new things. We shouldn't get too caught up on time spent working out, or miles per hour, or calories burned unless we're actually training for a marathon or something. One of the best workouts I ever had was when a friend and I took a soccer ball to an empty elementary school field on a weekend. We'd run around, sit down, kick the ball, sit down some more, walk, run, sit, kick - it was just like how kids play. I have no idea how many calories I burned, but I was consistently going for about two hours - elevated heartrate and heavy breathing and everything.



If you stop focusing on exercise solely as a means to lose weight, it becomes much easier to make it a part of your day. Just go outside and walk around until you feel like stopping. Run around until you feel like sitting down (even if you think you'd look stupid randomly sitting down after running for a few minutes - do what's best for you). Do a couple jumping jacks if you feel restless. Even if you only walk for ten minutes and you decide to go back in, at least it's something. Some days, maybe ten minutes is the best you can do. As daily movement becomes a habit, you'll be able to do more and more, and you'll begin reaping the health benefits of exercise. Of course, you should always be looking for ways to challenge yourself physically, but it should be a gradual, comfortable, natural progression.



A person exercising solely to lose weight wouldn't be able to go out for just 10 minutes, because they'd feel guilty about not doing a "full workout" - or they'd push themselves to continue and hate every moment of it. That's where people mess up with exercise.
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#30 Old 03-12-2010, 07:06 AM
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^^ Yes, definitely. I think too many people think of "exercise" as something they need to fit around other activities they actually enjoy, and that exercise "doesn't coun't" unless they hate every minute of it. I sometimes fall into that trap myself - I'll feel bad about not getting any exercise, and then I'll remember that I took an hour-long walk to work in the morning. Doy.
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