any alternative ideas for a child that is not being diagnosed correctly? - VeggieBoards
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#1 Old 05-13-2008, 07:58 PM
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hi!

thank you to all that have given me info/suggestions with regard to my lovely daughter!

i appreciated all suggestions and the time it took you to type them--thanks again.

we are now again at a loss given that the meds she was on, we are weaning her off of as they did NOTHING!!!

have any of you with kids (or people that have known someone with a kid) had any good/bad experience with alternative treatments like accupuncture/accupressure, or anything else with regards to childrens behavior?

any help is welcome!

if you have a suggestion and are near me, i will bake/cook for you even if the suggestion bites!!!!!!
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#2 Old 05-13-2008, 08:26 PM
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I am not aware of your daughter's history, being new to these boards (Can you point me to a link) but I have had good personal experience of Homeopathy for emotional/ behaviour problems while I myself was at school. My friend has her autistic son treated by a homeopath and swears by the treatment rather than conventional medicine. The good thing is, it will not have any adverse side affects, even if the wrong remedy is chosen to begin with
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#3 Old 05-14-2008, 10:36 AM
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What kind of behavior issues is your daughter having? How old is she?



My son has autism and he was misdiagnosed with ADD for a LONG time.
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#4 Old 05-14-2008, 10:43 AM
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she was diagnosed with oppositional defiant disorder and bipolar nos. we dont think the bipolar fits and neither does her psychiatrist. we are almost done weaning her off meds as they werent working. she just has outbreaks and says lots of nasty things when she feels as if she has been treated unfairly, when in reality she is just getting consequences for her actions. she has a lot of anger directed at her easygoing twin brother. she is doing a bit better at home but her reports from school are horrible. biting, hittting, violating personal space, invasion of privacy, poking the teacher in the eye, jumping on furniture and on and on. i think she is testing staff to see what it will take to get suspended--they wont suspend her there as it is a special program for children with special needs.

we are thinking of trying some add meds but she doesnt fit criteria for that either.
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#5 Old 05-14-2008, 11:59 AM
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How old is she? It seems amazing but another thing to try is allowing her no food coloring. A lot of ADD diagnoses are due to a chemical reaction of food coloring. i know you said it wasn't ADD but it could be adding to the problem.
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#6 Old 05-14-2008, 12:09 PM
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My son's autistic so his situation is pretty different from your daughter's but he has a lot of relaxation techniques that he uses to calm himself down when he starts feeling stressed out. I know one is that he uses accupressure on himself.



You could also look into food allergies. Some food allergies make kids feel so horrible all the time that it causes behavior problems that look like developmental disorders.
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#7 Old 05-14-2008, 02:10 PM
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she is 8 and we dont eat food coloring--i make most everything from scratch. she has been tested for every allergy they test for--both dietary and environmental.
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#8 Old 05-14-2008, 02:55 PM
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Have you tried removing sugary foods from her diet? I can't remember from previous posts but I was talking to my mom earlier about your situation. She said that SOME of my brother's problems (ADHD related) had to do with sugar and caffiene. How much raw food do you eat? I've heard a lot of people have had great success using raw food diets to cleanse toxins from other foods and medications. (Was reading an article at the salon on food triggered mental illness and cleansing diets.)



Maybe some of her problems can be linked to the school? Have you thought about having her school at home through the school for a short period of time? When I first left school and I planned on going back (which later changed) they were required to send a teacher out to my home with my school work to assist me. He'd bring by a days worth of work, we'd sit at the table for 1-2 hours working on it, and then he'd come back the next day. This went on for a couple of months while I was sorting out my own mental illness. You could talk to the school and see if they would be willing to offer something like this while you get everything sorted out.
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#9 Old 05-14-2008, 03:12 PM
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Gluten's being touted as a trigger for all sorts of emotional/behavioral problems, in our neck of the woods. I have no idea what the research says, but I thought I'd throw it out there as something to investigate.







Are you and hubby able to spend some time alone, away from your roles of mom and dad? Having a headstrong little one is tough, so don't forget to take care of yourselves, mkay?

The ones I pity are the ones who never stick out their neck for something they believe, never know the taste of moral struggle, and never have the thrill of victory. - Jonathan Kozol
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#10 Old 05-14-2008, 03:25 PM
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Originally Posted by Fritemare View Post

Have you tried removing sugary foods from her diet? I can't remember from previous posts but I was talking to my mom earlier about your situation. She said that SOME of my brother's problems (ADHD related) had to do with sugar and caffiene. How much raw food do you eat? I've heard a lot of people have had great success using raw food diets to cleanse toxins from other foods and medications. (Was reading an article at the salon on food triggered mental illness and cleansing diets.)



Maybe some of her problems can be linked to the school? Have you thought about having her school at home through the school for a short period of time? When I first left school and I planned on going back (which later changed) they were required to send a teacher out to my home with my school work to assist me. He'd bring by a days worth of work, we'd sit at the table for 1-2 hours working on it, and then he'd come back the next day. This went on for a couple of months while I was sorting out my own mental illness. You could talk to the school and see if they would be willing to offer something like this while you get everything sorted out.



she doesnt eat much added sugar and to rid our diets of it completely would be a nightmare. we dont eat a lot of raw and i am trying to incorporate more. it is difficult to have time to learn new things when i have to keep such a close eye on behavior.

she just started this school as we just moved. it is where she needs to be. they are trained to deal with children like jade there. jade would not suceed learning at home and my life would be a nightmare!!!



iamjen--she has no gluten insensitivity, so no point in taking gluten out of our diets. i did it once and she has been tested for it.



unfortunately my husband and i have no outlet for ourselves. we dont have a sitter, cant choose to pay for one even if we did. we dont have family and friends to help us--there isnt even anyone on my kids emergency contact form at school. its just us, has been for a long time. we havent been out without the kids since probably last september!!!!!
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#11 Old 05-14-2008, 11:09 PM
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I'm thinking some relaxation techniques might really help. Something that she can do for herself when she starts feeling like she's ready to explode. Nick does an acupressure thing on his face but I'm not remembering where he pokes himself. I'd ask him but he's already in bed. He also likes listening to relaxing music (his favorite is Enya). He's autistic so his issues are really different but another thing that's really helped is music lessons. He's been playing the violin since he was 9 (he's 16 now.) The violin lessons have help in every aspect of his life. It helped him learn to read, it helped his social skills, his motor skills, his wacky repetitive behaviors, everything.
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#12 Old 05-15-2008, 05:04 AM
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I'm assuming you have already trawled the Internet for info? Wikipedia has an entry for oppositional defiant disorder:



http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Opposit...fiant_disorder



It mentions a treatment that focuses on training the parents for how to deal with it.



(Also, in addition to gluten, removing cow's milk from the diet has been shown to have a positive effect on ADHD children. But then of course, I guess ADHD doesn't fit your daugther's symptoms.)

I no longer post here after VB was sold in 2012. (See my profile page for details.)
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#13 Old 05-19-2008, 10:09 AM
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I'm thinking some relaxation techniques might really help. Something that she can do for herself when she starts feeling like she's ready to explode. Nick does an acupressure thing on his face but I'm not remembering where he pokes himself. I'd ask him but he's already in bed. He also likes listening to relaxing music (his favorite is Enya). He's autistic so his issues are really different but another thing that's really helped is music lessons. He's been playing the violin since he was 9 (he's 16 now.) The violin lessons have help in every aspect of his life. It helped him learn to read, it helped his social skills, his motor skills, his wacky repetitive behaviors, everything.



we have a list of coping skills that she can use like taking deep breaths, going out to swing, cuddling with my husband or i, listening to her player etc. she knows she can ask for a hug whenever. she doesnt like her back rubbed but likes a hand held massager. it is difficult as our funds are VERY limited and cannot put her in xyz lessons right now. she once, when in a bad place and i had told her to use some of her coping skills, stated in a not nice tone that she couldnt use coping skills because "sage (twin brother) took all of my coping skills"!!!!! really? he apparently is powerful enough to have taken her ability to take deep breaths amongst other things!lol everything is his fault in her mind.

we are almost done weaning her off meds as they were doing nothing. we are looking into a yeast sensitivity as well as perhaps an issue with a latent infection, which can cause problems. just overwhelming to know where to look.

thank you for your suggestions!!!!
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#14 Old 05-19-2008, 10:16 AM
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Originally Posted by Indian Summer View Post

I'm assuming you have already trawled the Internet for info? Wikipedia has an entry for oppositional defiant disorder:



http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Opposit...fiant_disorder



It mentions a treatment that focuses on training the parents for how to deal with it.



(Also, in addition to gluten, removing cow's milk from the diet has been shown to have a positive effect on ADHD children. But then of course, I guess ADHD doesn't fit your daugther's symptoms.)



thank you IS!

yes i have been all over the internet in many diff. areas. i know all about ODD as i have a masters in counseling and have for a long time thought jade had that. the diagnosis has only been recent as the behaviors needed to be present in more than one environment and werent in the past, so she did not fit criteria. she has no gluten issues and we are vegan, so cows milk isnt an issue.

we have looked at several parent training focused programs. we are currently implementing a poker chip system for behavior/reward suggested by her social worker. cant i just take her to a casino where they have poker chips and flashing lights where the kids would be overwhelmed by it all and behave while i gamble? i am not into gambling, but maybe if they can behave there i can cultivate a new hobby!!! its all soo maddening!

thank you so much for your thoughts! i hope you and jen are well!!!
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#15 Old 05-20-2008, 03:51 AM
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Sounds like an early onset of borderline to me, but what's in a word... even when knowing what it's called, you can't do much about it except finding ways to live & cope and yes, maybe improve conditions for everyone in the house a tiny bit. I actually mean it does not really matter what it's called... I remember your earlier post and I gave you some info about yin shin jyutsu (ancient Japanses healing technique) then. I'd want to add that music and/or sports can benefit your daughter greatly, as it will add balance to her life. Too much "brainy" activity and not enough "physical" (active or relaxing) activity may be unbalancing her, I don't know what they do in school but I'd definitely take her swimming as often as possible, or let her do anything that appeals to her and that she can handle, track & court may be good for her too if she likes being outdoors (doesn't sound like she's ready for team sports to me). If you can afford it, any equine programme for children with behavioral difficulties can be very beneficial as well (as would be swimming with dolphins, but this is not accessible for many people). Contact with animals in a supervised setting can add lots of balance to a kid's life !



Sorry for sounding a bit rambling today... I am very tired but I do want to reach out to you. I hope you can find further ways to make your daughter's life (and by extension your life as well) more comfortable and more enjoyable.
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#16 Old 05-20-2008, 09:21 AM
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I work in Special Education, primarily with children with behavioural disorders mainly. Some autism, ODD, etc... I can't say that I know many tricks that you haven't heard about, or tried.



I know you said money is an issue. Are you in the U.S.? (I can't remember.) Many social service agencies in the U.S. have a Respite program where they have trained staff who provide free child care just so you can get a break and do "adult" things. Please look into this option as you'll be 100% more equipped to handle things if you are rested and have had a break. Parenting is tough enough with typically developing children!!



Another thing is to widen your circle of friends (aquaintances even). Socializing is something YOU need for feedback, ideas and support, but your daughter also needs it for many reasons as well.



Join a group of parents with similarly behaving children (maybe the school has a suggestion? or her psychiatrist? Or even with typically develpoing/behaving peers if they are agreeable to it. (Don't know how extreme your daughter's behaviours can be or if they're a danger to other children)



Post a notice on a bullitin board somewhere?), a group at church, a play group, a sports group? (As suggested, physical activities are a really good thing here - many organizations offer sports teams for children who can't compete on standard teams; soccer, T-Ball, swimming or baseball, are all EXCELLANT).



I'm sure you know it's important for you to interact with your daughter around other children AND adults, so you have a better idea what triggers things - even if you "know" what sets her off at home, it could be totally different in a social environment. I haven't read all your past posts, but some of them I remember. I'll see what else I can think of...



As for alternative ideas, let me think on taht one a bit here too, others have given good suggestions so far. Good luck.
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#17 Old 05-20-2008, 11:12 AM
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Sounds like an early onset of borderline to me, but what's in a word... even when knowing what it's called, you can't do much about it except finding ways to live & cope and yes, maybe improve conditions for everyone in the house a tiny bit. I actually mean it does not really matter what it's called... I remember your earlier post and I gave you some info about yin shin jyutsu (ancient Japanses healing technique) then. I'd want to add that music and/or sports can benefit your daughter greatly, as it will add balance to her life. Too much "brainy" activity and not enough "physical" (active or relaxing) activity may be unbalancing her, I don't know what they do in school but I'd definitely take her swimming as often as possible, or let her do anything that appeals to her and that she can handle, track & court may be good for her too if she likes being outdoors (doesn't sound like she's ready for team sports to me). If you can afford it, any equine programme for children with behavioral difficulties can be very beneficial as well (as would be swimming with dolphins, but this is not accessible for many people). Contact with animals in a supervised setting can add lots of balance to a kid's life !



Sorry for sounding a bit rambling today... I am very tired but I do want to reach out to you. I hope you can find further ways to make your daughter's life (and by extension your life as well) more comfortable and more enjoyable.





at this stage no one knows and even if they think they know, it seems to change. i looked into that japanese healing technique and am trying to find one in my area that takes insurance. if they dont, not an option.



we encourage physical activity but cannot pay for any sorts of classes right now and i dont see that changing in the near future. we are getting a summer pool pass but if kids are fighting and/or jade is in a bad mood there is no way i am getting in a car with them. i have to take both of them which can go good or bad.

i know that contact with animals can be very beneficial but because of limited funds she is limited to our pets! i cant always walkl while she rides her bike and depending on her mood i cannot at times send her on a bike ride by herself. then she is limited to the backyard, so i can see she is being safe. she runs the dog back there and swings but thats about it.
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#18 Old 05-20-2008, 11:21 AM
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I know you said money is an issue. Are you in the U.S.? (I can't remember.) Many social service agencies in the U.S. have a Respite program where they have trained staff who provide free child care just so you can get a break and do "adult" things. Please look into this option as you'll be 100% more equipped to handle things if you are rested and have had a break. Parenting is tough enough with typically developing children!!



Another thing is to widen your circle of friends (aquaintances even). Socializing is something YOU need for feedback, ideas and support, but your daughter also needs it for many reasons as well.



Join a group of parents with similarly behaving children (maybe the school has a suggestion? or her psychiatrist? Or even with typically develpoing/behaving peers if they are agreeable to it. (Don't know how extreme your daughter's behaviours can be or if they're a danger to other children)



Post a notice on a bullitin board somewhere?), a group at church, a play group, a sports group? (As suggested, physical activities are a really good thing here - many organizations offer sports teams for children who can't compete on standard teams; soccer, T-Ball, swimming or baseball, are all EXCELLANT).



I'm sure you know it's important for you to interact with your daughter around other children AND adults, so you have a better idea what triggers things - even if you "know" what sets her off at home, it could be totally different in a social environment. I haven't read all your past posts, but some of them I remember. I'll see what else I can think of...



As for alternative ideas, let me think on taht one a bit here too, others have given good suggestions so far. Good luck.



i am in the u.s. we have thought of respite programs but then we still have my son, so its not as if we could do "adult" things. even if we could it would be limited to necessity shopping as we cannot spend money on fun stuff for us.



not really a way to widen non-existent circle of friends at this stage of the game--life is not about what i need right now. i know what you are saying tho. i go to workout in the morning and that is my saving grace in this world. however, when school is out i will have to come up with many carrots to dangle before the kids to make sure they behave in the free daycare i can leave them in for 2 hrs. there are often times kids there age that they can socialize with and they play with kids in the neighborhood.



i cant join a group with parents that have kids with similar problems. i struggle with directions, and i have a gps which helps slightly. even if i didnt, i dont have childcare and my husband has to work. then there is the whole, if i had occasion to talk to others i really dont want to spend more time having conversations about not pleasant things.



i realy appreciate all of your suggestions and dont mean to shoot them down we are just stuck right about now in many ways.



we are trying to leave no stones unturned but it has been a tough road.
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#19 Old 05-20-2008, 01:23 PM
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I would still definitely look into respite. You could at least use the time to spend some quality time with your other kid. My husband's sister and her husband adopted a little girl with severe autism and multiple other issues (she was literally a crack baby). Respite seriously has saved their marriage. They were seriously considering giving their daughter back to the state. The eventually ended up getting an aide who comes to their house for several hours a day to help out and the state pays for it. You probably don't need anything that drastic though.



As far as finding a group of parents of kids with similar issues, you might be able to find a support group online.
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#20 Old 05-20-2008, 02:39 PM
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I would still definitely look into respite. You could at least use the time to spend some quality time with your other kid. My husband's sister and her husband adopted a little girl with severe autism and multiple other issues (she was literally a crack baby). Respite seriously has saved their marriage. They were seriously considering giving their daughter back to the state. The eventually ended up getting an aide who comes to their house for several hours a day to help out and the state pays for it. You probably don't need anything that drastic though.



As far as finding a group of parents of kids with similar issues, you might be able to find a support group online.



there arent any respite places near me that are still operating. at the same time, the respite i need would be being able to get stuff done. i would need to spend the time pushing my son aside, who would be bored with no one to play with, so i could get stuff done. i need a respite from trying to figure out what is wrong and how best to help my baby. thats not in the cards!lol

i appreciate your thoughts



i havent found anything online that fits what i am looking for at this point.
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#21 Old 05-20-2008, 03:54 PM
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she just has outbreaks and says lots of nasty things when she feels as if she has been treated unfairly



Has she been checked out for autistic disorder or PPD? I'm in no way trying to make a diagnosis or anything, I'm far from an expert, but the line above just sounds so much like my nephew, especially when he was younger. He has Asperger's. He was also labeled with ODD when he was younger which turned out not to be the case.
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#22 Old 05-20-2008, 07:58 PM
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Has she been checked out for autistic disorder or PPD?

I was going to ask the same thing - I just wasn't sure if that had been mentioned somewhere previously, since I was guilty of not reading all the posts.



You might want to read some of the stuff by Leslie E. Packer and "rage attacks" or sometimes called Intermittent Explosive Disorder" (IED). I don't think it's a specifically diagnosed disorder yet but there's a lot of interesting stuff out there about it that might be helpful.



I still think respite needs to be looked into. You CAN find something if you look, and often they will take both siblings even if just one has issues. So use the time to go shopping, nothing wrong with that.



As for you and your husband "needing" time away from the kids, your post rings loud and clear with the needs for exactly that, regardless of how much you think you do or don't. You're doing them a disfavor by not meeting your needs as well. You cannot care for your child adequately if you are tired, stressed, and don't have time for adult communication. You don't have to go "out" - There are tons of free things that people can do, even just 1/2 an hour of free time will make tremendous difference.



Finding your way around can be difficult, even with a GPS (personally I cannot use them for ANYTHING!!). I was a serious basket-case with driving and used to rely on people for all my travel away from home; but time and circumstance and a divorce have FORCED me to have to drive and now I can pretty much find anything, even in the big, bad and BUSY city!! It was terrifying at first but SO worth it! It gets better with trying and practice.



You are obviously able to write and communicate and use the computer. Google or other map services are a great resource and the directions are spelled out step-by-step and easier to follow than you might think.



Isolating yourself may feel like the easiest thing to do but in the end will hurt your child(ren) and their growth and development, AND eventually serve to make you feel more helpless and out of touch with life.

If not social groups (which I still think you could work into the day somehow) how about places where people are, but you don't have to actually talk to them... the playground, the park, the beach, the lake, botanical gardens, duck ponds, places that are free of charge but might provide a new and different atmosphere for you and your kids?



How about (Don't hate me for this!!) the indoor playground at a (gasp!!!) fast food restaurant? All you need to buy is a cup of coffee, seriouly, and you can take the kids for an hour or so... Works even in bad weather and there's a place for you to sit and watch without them in your face... maybe a nice activity for them after you go to the gym...



I don't know, just some ideas...
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#23 Old 05-20-2008, 11:11 PM
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Oops I meant PDD. I need to pay more attention when I post.
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#24 Old 05-21-2008, 09:58 AM
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Oops I meant PDD. I need to pay more attention when I post.



thats funny--when you initially posted i had no idea what you were talking about and tried to find info on PPD, which i only knew of as post partum depression, as i am sure you do. i felt like an idiot, googling it and coming up blank!!!hahahaha anywhoo...jadey does not fit any of pdd or autism spectrum criteria. i am very familiar with aspergers, worked with a teen and have a cousin with it. that is not jadey.

i really appreciate your help!!!
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#25 Old 05-21-2008, 10:06 AM
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You might want to read some of the stuff by Leslie E. Packer and "rage attacks" or sometimes called Intermittent Explosive Disorder" (IED). I don't think it's a specifically diagnosed disorder yet but there's a lot of interesting stuff out there about it that might be helpful.



I still think respite needs to be looked into. You CAN find something if you look, and often they will take both siblings even if just one has issues. So use the time to go shopping, nothing wrong with that.



As for you and your husband "needing" time away from the kids, your post rings loud and clear with the needs for exactly that, regardless of how much you think you do or don't. You're doing them a disfavor by not meeting your needs as well. You cannot care for your child adequately if you are tired, stressed, and don't have time for adult communication. You don't have to go "out" - There are tons of free things that people can do, even just 1/2 an hour of free time will make tremendous difference.



Finding your way around can be difficult, even with a GPS (personally I cannot use them for ANYTHING!!). I was a serious basket-case with driving and used to rely on people for all my travel away from home; but time and circumstance and a divorce have FORCED me to have to drive and now I can pretty much find anything, even in the big, bad and BUSY city!! It was terrifying at first but SO worth it! It gets better with trying and practice.



You are obviously able to write and communicate and use the computer. Google or other map services are a great resource and the directions are spelled out step-by-step and easier to follow than you might think.



Isolating yourself may feel like the easiest thing to do but in the end will hurt your child(ren) and their growth and development, AND eventually serve to make you feel more helpless and out of touch with life.

If not social groups (which I still think you could work into the day somehow) how about places where people are, but you don't have to actually talk to them... the playground, the park, the beach, the lake, botanical gardens, duck ponds, places that are free of charge but might provide a new and different atmosphere for you and your kids?



How about (Don't hate me for this!!) the indoor playground at a (gasp!!!) fast food restaurant? All you need to buy is a cup of coffee, seriouly, and you can take the kids for an hour or so... Works even in bad weather and there's a place for you to sit and watch without them in your face... maybe a nice activity for them after you go to the gym...



I don't know, just some ideas...



thank you for all of your thoughts--much appreciated.

i will check out that book--thanks for reference.

respite just wont work--especially because i would have to drive over an hour to get to a place and car rides with frick and frack can be not fun!

i fully agree with you that me and my husband need time---just cant get it now. like i said, i workout in the morning and my husband makes time to work out but that is our only "out" now and has been for a long time. i wont give that up--thats MY time and i NEED it. i agree that a parent does a disservice to themselves and their children if they dont have ME time, but working out is all i have now. i am never tired, am stressed like anyone else--this struggle is day to day stuff for me. aside from my husband, who is awesome, no i dont have adult communication unless you count "paper or plastic maam, oh you brought your own bag? ok" there is a friend i meet for an hour or so every 3 weeks. aside from that---NOTHING!!!!!ARRRGHHHHHlol
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#26 Old 05-21-2008, 10:17 AM
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i sent that before i wanted to--TnS--here is more on what you said!!

driving--i understand that for some time and circumstance would "make" them into getting around better. this is not the case for me. my difficulties are far more than anyone gets. lots of people say they have an "easy" way for me to get to xyz--not so for me and then they think i am being difficult when i still dont "get" it. take me to my backyard, spin me around, and maybe i will get home. trying and practice doesent work for me. i cant sucessfully use google maps/directions. i am lucky i know where my driveway is. i am not an idiot--i just struggle in lots of ways people dont get.

the kids can get to the park on their own and i will be taking them to the pool this summer. where i will sit, alone reading stuff on how to help jade. its all i have to do with them. i cant get them downtown (chicago) to do stuff. i would be crying as we would be lost 30 seconds after we started!!!!

i CANNOT believe you suggested a fast food restaurant! i have asked michael to have you BANNED--not just from VB--but the planet. michael is powerful--say goodbye to your children for that suggestion!! ha--funny you say that. we never ate at fast food places but would take the kids there to the play place. one time jade, who also has occasional breathing issues had difficulty breathing while playing there. since then she doesent want to go b/c she thinks it was b/c of the play place!! they at 8, are too old anyway.

thank you for all suggestions!! you ROCK!
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#27 Old 06-09-2008, 02:29 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Prajna_Seeker View Post

How old is she? It seems amazing but another thing to try is allowing her no food coloring. A lot of ADD diagnoses are due to a chemical reaction of food coloring. i know you said it wasn't ADD but it could be adding to the problem.

When I was about five, I was put on what is called the Feingold Diet, which meant I could not eat anything with aritificial colors or flavors, and also most fruits (acidic fruits such as oranges or apples, but I could have some pears or bananas). I have Asperger's Syndrome (high-functioning Autism, really), and eating a bright orange tootsie pop was like the worst thing I could do- I would get riled up or really sensitive and perhaps throw a tantrum for little reasons. I was sensitive- candy made things worse.



Having a Vitamin B12 supplement helped me when I was ten or eleven to eat things with artificial colors again, and I can eat them now with no problems, I grew out of it.
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