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#1 Old 03-08-2009, 05:48 PM
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I'd like to make compost, can I just bury veg peel etc in my garden in various places and leave it decompose or do i have to have one of those bin things...if so then why?
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#2 Old 03-08-2009, 06:52 PM
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you could just put your peelings into your soil and dig it in. it'd break down. but how fast and how effectively depends on the soil composition, the bacteria and worms and whatever living there, the amount of air and whatever getting into the soil, etc, and it'd probably result in you having little areas of really nice soil, and others not so great. which'd make things a bit patchy. but yeah, its totally doable. your garden wouldn't explode or anything.



the pros of having a compost bin include being able to manage your compost as it breaks down, and having the results all in one place so they're easy to use when you need them.



you don't need to buy a really swanky bin, and if you don't want it in the kitchen you could make a compost pile in the garden. there is some good info here:



http://www.gardenorganic.org.uk/orga...compost_pf.php
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#3 Old 03-08-2009, 08:22 PM
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if you just bury the scraps in your garden it really wont help the plants much because it will take much longer for the matter to decompose that way. a bin is used (or a hole or designated area of the yard) to compost because the green and brown matter decompose from the heat that is created from the pile. this happens best when the scraps are contained together.

if you want to just bury a hole for composting it can work great, just remember to pick a spot that wont get flooded if it rains, it is also a good idea to use a lid or mesh cover for the hole b/c critters will be attracted to newer scraps.
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#4 Old 03-09-2009, 12:22 PM
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You might want to pick up a book on composting. I have and recommend this book for everything you need to know on composting. http://www.amazon.com/Backyard-Compo.../dp/0962976830

There is more to it than throwing whatever tablescraps you have into a bin. Also, you need to be sure what and what does not goe into them and how to control the ratios.
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#5 Old 03-09-2009, 03:08 PM
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My dad always just had a bit of the garden fenced off with chicken wire type stuff and he threw in weeds, grass clippings, leaves, and other organic matter. He'd turn it over periodically and then use the stuff on the bottom the next spring for his garden. I'm planning a similar system (just a little fenced off pile), though I've not yet decided where to put it. Is a sunny spot better? A shady spot? (My dad hasn't called me back yet )

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#6 Old 03-11-2009, 04:05 PM
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thanks guys. i tried a compost heap in corner of my garden some years back....chucked on veg peelings and weeds etc but nothing happened. they all died and went brown but it nowhere resembled compost!!????
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#7 Old 03-11-2009, 05:10 PM
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Yeah, you can't just leave it and call it good. It has to be moved around every once in a while. They make compost tumblers that are really convient, but they arent necessary. Also mulchers are good for breaking down the dry stuff you add. You need to stir or turn it periodically and check the moisture levels. It should be at least a quarter to half wet material to dry. Without moisture there is no nitrogen. I still suggest looking into finding a book on it. Once you get the jist of it, it's pretty simple! Good luck!
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#8 Old 03-12-2009, 02:44 AM
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I generally add layers of lawn clippings/ hay to help with the heat and occasionally add some moisture. I also add in some soil layers.



You can also get small ones for a kitchen if you are struggling for space. This is really cool and many of my friends use this system. I think it's because they like to say Bokashi lots though.



http://www.bokashi.com.au/How-Bokashi-works.htm
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#9 Old 03-12-2009, 08:37 AM
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Hey, that's is very cool! Way better than a bucket out in the garage. I don't even know why I never thought of looking into one of those, very awesome!
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#10 Old 03-12-2009, 08:48 PM
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They are the best. I have a massive bin out back for our ridiculous amount of compost(I tend not to eat something if it hasn't been chopped by me), so I don't personally get to have the joy of Bokashi in my everyday life. My friends with small spaces love them.
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#11 Old 03-12-2009, 09:54 PM
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One approach to aeration that I've been considering is taking a piece of PVC tubing, drilling some holes in it and sticking it through the compost pile. I haven't tried it yet but thought it might be a good option for people who are lazy about rotating their compost pile with a pitchfork but don't want to spend the money on a tumbler.



For composting kitchen scraps, a worm box is worth considering. I've been trying it for a while and it's kinda fun (okay, I'm weird). I got my worms from a pet store where they would have otherwise ended up inside somebody's pet lizard or sleeping with the fishes so I consider it a "pet rescue."

Catch a shape in the circles of my mind.
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#12 Old 03-20-2009, 04:43 PM
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Hi all,



The best luck we have had with compost is just taking the grass clippings and setting them in a corner of the yard. Every so often turn it over, and you will find the "black gold" at the bottom. You can take some of the finished compost from this pile, and put it on another new pile that has the veggie peelings, shredded newpapers, etc. and the organisms in the finished mix will help get the new pile going.

I even went so far as to buy a bin composter a few years ago. It is okay I guess, but not as good as just piling up those grass clippings!

Hope that helps a bit.
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#13 Old 04-03-2009, 06:56 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by coley View Post

I generally add layers of lawn clippings/ hay to help with the heat and occasionally add some moisture. I also add in some soil layers.



You can also get small ones for a kitchen if you are struggling for space. This is really cool and many of my friends use this system. I think it's because they like to say Bokashi lots though.



http://www.bokashi.com.au/How-Bokashi-works.htm



I dont have a bucket or bin or anything I just put them in the soil and mix it in with grass ect...and it has worked great for years.



hey hey have a hippie day
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#14 Old 04-29-2009, 12:41 PM
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Hm I would have never thought. I just started a garden and have been wondering about compost. I put a watermelon peel in the soil but wasn't sure it was okay to just throw it in. Also I've heard about coffee grounds, because we have ALOT of those. How long does the compost pile take? Will it have compost in time to feed my garden?

"When the power of love overcomes the love of power, the world will then know peace" - Jimi Hendrix
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#15 Old 05-04-2009, 03:27 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KirstenKat View Post

Hm I would have never thought. I just started a garden and have been wondering about compost. I put a watermelon peel in the soil but wasn't sure it was okay to just throw it in. Also I've heard about coffee grounds, because we have ALOT of those. How long does the compost pile take? Will it have compost in time to feed my garden?



I personally wouldn't just dig things straight in. I would think that for the most benefit you should allow it to break down in a designated area. Set aside a spot and put in all vege scaps, coffee grounds, hair and layer with clippings from your lawn/hay. Make sure you keep it moist but not overly wet. If it's too stinky I usually add some more clippings as I think it indicates that there is too many garden scraps.



Turn it every now and then and it should take around six weeks.
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