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#1 Old 10-22-2007, 05:56 AM
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This question is about mental health and has nothing to do with veg*nism.



As I posted before, my husband is not well right now. Besides his physical problem (which has still not been cleared up nor even identified), he has, as long as I can remember, struggled with a mental health problem.



I have come to the conclusion that his main problem is multiple phobia. It comes and goes and is rather severe for the moment, which makes life with him very difficult for me and our daughter. He also presents borderline and autistic traits, but nothing to cover a specific check-list, it's all pretty overlapping.



He refuses any kind of therapy. He even refuses most of the time to admit that the phobia is limiting our (his & our) lives and is having a destructive influence on our relationship. Somewhere deep down I am sure he knows, but in the rare moments he will admit that he has a problem, he always adds that he intends to stay that way.



We have come to a point where I regularly fear to have to call emergency services on him because he becomes nearly psychotic. He does have enough control to snap out of his "attack" when I pick up the phone though so I ask myself if it is not just an extreme form of manipulation ?



He has no friends and there is no one he trusts enough (family, our GP, anyone) to talk to. He even avoids building friendships or relationships with people, because he does not wish to be close to anyone.



My question is... has anyone here ever been in my position and what do you think I can do ? I have some counseling myself but besides from leaving him (which would cause equally severe problems of a more practical kind), I have had no useful advice.



I know there isn't much to say besides getting him into therapy somehow, and/or leaving him to deal with it... but I would be grateful for any experience you want to share with me. I know there are some new methods to overcome phobia and I would be very interested in hearing anything from people who have successfully used some non-confrontational method or therapy to find more balance and less fear in their lives.
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#2 Old 10-22-2007, 06:42 AM
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He refuses any kind of therapy. He even refuses most of the time to admit that the phobia is limiting our (his & our) lives and is having a destructive influence on our relationship. Somewhere deep down I am sure he knows, but in the rare moments he will admit that he has a problem, he always adds that he intends to stay that way.



We have come to a point where I regularly fear to have to call emergency services on him because he becomes nearly psychotic. He does have enough control to snap out of his "attack" when I pick up the phone though so I ask myself if it is not just an extreme form of manipulation ?



My question is... has anyone here ever been in my position and what do you think I can do ? I have some counseling myself but besides from leaving him (which would cause equally severe problems of a more practical kind), I have had no useful advice.



I know there isn't much to say besides getting him into therapy somehow, and/or leaving him to deal with it... but I would be grateful for any experience you want to share with me. I know there are some new methods to overcome phobia and I would be very interested in hearing anything from people who have successfully used some non-confrontational method or therapy to find more balance and less fear in their lives.



i have been in a similar situation altho i wasn't married to the person but i was in an intimate relationship with them.



i struggled for a year to get them to work on their own problems/work with a counselor/do something to make the situation better. and eventually, with the help of other people, i did come to see it as a form of manipulation on their part. i eventually had to leave for my own mental health and wellbeing. and, in the long run, i knew leaving would be better for my partner as well as it would force that person to make a decision about their own wellbeing.



leaving was really really hard. but i'm totally glad i did it.
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#3 Old 10-22-2007, 06:53 AM
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The phobia is very real though, he's not acting that part...



The way he uses his phobia is manipulative however.



He uses it as a tool somehow. Very odd.



That's why I think we need to get rid of the phobia and see how he functions from there on... I am not very hopeful though, esp. since he keeps asserting that he does not wish to change.



He did talk me into buying a house with him 6 months ago and that was somehow a trick as well I guess, to make me forever (20 year mortgage) linked with him... he seems to need this bond to ensure he has someone to blame his weird behavior on ?!
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#4 Old 10-22-2007, 07:23 AM
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If you believe this phobia is real then hopefully he can get help with it somehow. If he's unwilling to do so then what really are your options? If he can "shut down" the behaviour whenever he wants though, that's a whole different story. It sows that he has control of this issue and is choosing to manipulate you with it. You are also, in some way, choosing to allow this, and choosing to react to it.



The only persoanl relation I have to this was that I was in a terribly manipulative relationship with a sick man for 5 years. I left him. I wish I had done so sooner. There was no changing him. He seemed to me to have BPD, and/or maybe NPD. It was awful. In the end, I found myself calling the police- which, mind you, is not something this girl should have to do. So I quit him, he was a sort of addiction for me, and I moved on.



You have a daughter which makes the situation drastically different. How is she handling this? Does she see it? Her best interest is the most important and if she is being affected by this, you should do whatever it takes to get her into a healthy environment.



I wish you peace and some sort of help through this. Let us know how you're doing
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#5 Old 10-22-2007, 07:31 AM
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ok, i bet this'll sound really cold, but its not meant to be mean in any way.



the phobias might well be very real, and his fear might also be very real, but the crux of the matter is that he's stated that he has no intention to deal with it whatsoever- so its likely that nothing will change on his part, unless its via some kind of miraculous/spiritual intervention, or huge and major crisis forcing change.



if you've been kind, gentle, supportive, caring, understanding, patient, and diplomatic in discussing getting help, and he's still digging his heels in, then you need to focus on YOU and YOUR CHILD, and maintaining your sanities. which might very well mean getting the heck out of there before it gets any worse.



ask yourself, are you prepared to continue with things the way they are, with no change in sight? if so, for how long? would you consider setting a deadline... say...3 months. would very calmly and clearly saying to him "i can't hack this any more, i'll support you through it, but if things aren't on their way to getting better in 3 months, i'm gonna need to make big changes to my life" shake him into action? i wonder if it'd shake him into a hissy-fit, panic attack, and blackmail/guilttrip session instead?



right now, he's using you as a prop, whether with intentional manipulation, or just as a deep seated coping strategy. he's probably steering and blackmailing and guilt tripping you all over the place- you get so used to living in it, that you really often can't see the wood for the trees. if he's anything like the people with major issues that i've known, he sure as hell won't change or get help while everything is relatively comfortable for him (his needs and desires are probably being pretty well pandered to, he's got a partner, he's got a pretty good deal of degree of security and control in his life compared to how things could be, he's getting away with acting out and not getting help, etc).



if he has phobias and paranoia (sounds paranoid to me!) lots of aspects of his life are probably really scary and chaotic for him- if everything isn't falling seriously apart around his knees right now, what real incentive or vital need does he have to face his fears head on?



i'd personally get myself out of there, but thats cos i've had a similar situation with a family member, and couldn't go through it again- you have to reach a point like that for yourself, where enough is enough. he might suddenly start to work on getting it together when he realises you won't stand for it any more, but if you do decide to leave, don't leave with that in mind, cos it might not work like that at all- and it most probably won't- leave with your sanity in mind. practical issues can be fixed- there are lots of agencies and groups which will support you and your child, and friends and family will come out of the woodwork, especially if you're not shy in asking for help.



do YOU take part in any support groups? we all definately need to spend some time around sane people! and your daughter... is she getting help for the things she no doubt sees, hears, and experiences at home? kids are very astute and pick up on everything, she'll be being affected more than you might realise.
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#6 Old 10-22-2007, 07:50 AM
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Thanks for all the response.



I have a couple of really good friends and a lot of online forum support.



I think if I put the pressure on, all it will lead to is that he will think of revenge and leave a huge financial mess. He already threatened to burn down the hosue. Pretty hard to do for someone who has a phobia of fire as well as all the other fears... but it shows the way his mind works. Anything to make me do what he wants...



We're in a particular situation with a 20 year mortgage and a house we just bought 6 months ago, which where we are we're not allowed legally to sell again before 2 years of ownership. To meet most of the mortgage we would have to sell it with a profit and the market is stalling right now and the house is in need of costly repairs. So what I need to know now is what we are going to do about this house business. Also, the move itself was a huge enterprise and I am still not recovered from it. Short of tossing out more than half of my stuff I don't see how I can move again within the next few months, even if I were financially able to do so.



My best option is for him to leave and to go on paying part of the mortgage. This is actually an option he has mentioned. I am not sure within what timespan he was thinking though, or if he was at all considering this as a realistic possibility. It is very hard to have a normal conversation with him right now.



Yes, I have been kind and supportive for 8 (long) years. Yes, our child is affected by the situation. But I am not prepared to suffer financially for the rest of my life because HE decides he won't get any help, because that would mean he would have to REALLY make an effort. So I have one main option: try to get out of this with as little financial damage to myself as possible, while protecting my daughter's best interests.



Of course the SIMPLE solution would be for him to do something about his issues. But you are right Jen. He has stated he wouldn't do this, so I must take the other road. I don't think a deadline will work with him but I think I have to let the idea of his moving out take root. My problem with this is that it will take time and also courage on his part. HE will need to move and as you say, he is quite comfortable where he is.



I am going in circles here aren't I ?!!



I'd still love to hear from people who have conquered their phobia. His are animals (bugs, spiders, dogs, ...), thunderstorms, travel (esp. airplanes) and basically everything. With spiders, bugs and rodents at the top of the list. I have a theory about this but I guess it's not relevant for the main topic I brought up.
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#7 Old 10-22-2007, 08:09 AM
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i wonder if you can somehow have him surgically removed from the house and mortgage if he won't go himself, or without causing you trouble? threats of arson wouldn't go down too well with the mortgage company, i'll bet! psychotic behaviour... could the police or social services intervene? would getting him sectioned (or the belgian equivelent of this) be an option- at least that'd give you 28 days or so breathing space to get wheels turning? is there anything like the citizens advice bureaux in belgium, that could give you free advice? if you could get him out, could you take on a housemate/tennant to help with the mortgage?



eta: i know this is probably a bit irrelevant, but does he have an alcohol problem? its just that phobias about rats and bugs and spiders and thunderstorms, combined with itching, make me think of brain, liver and nerve damage caused by alcoholism- my relative also used to feel and see cobwebs touching him/in his line of vision. psychosis, paranoia, manipulation, guilt trips, co-dependancy, etc... kinda just add to the pot with things i've seen in alcoholics too.
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#8 Old 10-22-2007, 11:04 AM
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It would be difficult to aim for "surgical removal" given his gift for manipulation. I'm pretty likely to be the one ending up in detention...



Best to let him leave and let him think it was his idea in the first place. Not sure if that will work. If not, plan B. Get out of Dodge and see lawyer. May take a couple of months.



A tenant is a good idea. Not sure if that will work either since we are not in town here but about 10 miles out of city limits. There are trains and buses though and I might find someone willing to share. Wouldn't cover half the mortgage anyway but might contribute... Something to keep in mind !



There is a plan C: find rich man willing to take over half of mortgage. Hah. Fat chance... but you never know ! (anyone interested, pls IM me)



Still curious about phobia cures. But wondering now... chicken or egg... phobia or manipulation, which comes first and if we remove the phobia, will the manipulation change shape but still be effective ??



No alcohol or drugs here, he's pretty scared of either. My ex was a heavy drinker and I thought I'd done wise to steer clear of that this time around... until he revealed himself to be a psychotic phobic paranoiac...
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#9 Old 10-22-2007, 11:41 AM
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Anyone want to move this to relationships, is OK with me.
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#10 Old 10-22-2007, 12:53 PM
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I have quite a bit of exerperience with people with mental disorders (as well as dealing with my own). Manipulation on the part of the [mental illness] sufferer is really par for the course no matter what illness/disorder. And if you think about it, it really makes sense. Most of the sufferer's energy is spent on feeding/hiding their disorder and manipulating people/situations is how they survive life. If one of your husbands phobias is losing you/being alone then he will do and say anything to keep you, even if it doesn't make sense, even if he has to lie, create drama, make threats. And the more he feels like he's losing control and the phobia is winning (i.e. he's losing you), the more frantic he will become and the more he will act out.



I really feel for you because I've been and am there now. I've been with my spouse for almost 9 years and have had to deal with his issues (adhd/bipolar/narcissism are a few of what he seems to exhibit) alone because of his denial and refusal to seek help for himself (and us). And many of my own issues have placed me in a position where I have not been able to leave even at times when leaving seemed necessary. So, it really is a vicious cycle of co-dependency. And I've also struggled with the anxiety of owning a home with him and spending many days/months trying to figure out what to do if/when I leave him.



Does he get paranoid about his phobias? I mean, does he think that the bugs/rodents are out to get him or other delusions? And if he does, is he ever able to be rational about the phobias (i.e. can he ever admit that these are actually phobias and not real?) You mentioned that you were or are in therapy? What does your therapist think about your husband's behaviors?
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#11 Old 10-22-2007, 02:36 PM
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Right now my therapist is helping me to cope on a day-to-day basis. She thinks we'd best wait until the 2 years are out and look at the situation then, to see if we still want/need to sell the house. She has been helping me to avoid/deflect conflicts and she has been helping me with energy therapy (to stay balanced myself).



My husband does have paranoid moments, more in a "plot" kind of theory ("you're all out to get me, aren't you ?") but these are rare. He does, at the back of his mind, know that his phobia are not "real" but most of the time he spends a lot of energy trying to prove that he is perfectly normal and that I am abnormal (he has recently called me a "nature person" as if it were something very disgusting to be, because he is afraid of nature himself and I am not). He claims I am not supportive when I tell him he suffers from phobia and refuse to share his fears, but he is mighty happy when I remove spiders for him...



He is, overall, a conflict-seeking and basically unhappy person. I just had the window-frames of our house repainted and - without thinking actually - had them done in brown, like they were before. He nagged me a lot about this because he claims he would have preferred them in blue. I ended up ignoring this complaint because I am reasonably sure that, had I had them painted in blue, he would have demanded they were brown. That's the kind of person he is. He did not like our previous house, nor the one before that (both rentals). It was his idea to buy this one and I asked him 100 times if he was absolutely sure and he kept saying yes, he was sure. Until we lived in the house for a few weeks, and then he started being unhappy again.



He has been reproaching me that we have no intimate relationship anymore but does not understand that I can't interact on an intimate, trusting level with someone who swears and insults me all the time. He claims lots of people swear a lot of the time. I am sorry but I wasn't raised that way... and I don't remember his parents swearing much either when they were alive.



He is now abroad for work for a few days. One of the last things I said to him before he left was that I really will never understand why he would throw away family life and relative material comfort just to be able to STAY A PHOBIC. His phobia is that much a part of his identity that he is ready to pay a very heavy price in order to keep it !



Something which frightened me too is that he said he refuses to bond with anyone anymore (except for his kid, which he can't help but bond with). I think he feels bonds make him vulnerable somehow. But does this mean that he is consciously turning himself into a full sociopath ?



I have been wondering if there is any form of therapy (if he would accept or seek it) which could be effective, as his behavior is obviously very deteriorated and ingrained. I think that when we met he must have been in a rather "good" phase because he was thoughtful and sensitive and he even showed a sense of humour. And that's just a few years ago. I still think it's the overwhelming phobia which makes him act out so... and I doubt there is really a cure for this kind of problem...



And I can very well have a full understanding of all these problems but that still doesn't solve MY problem, which is finding a way out of the abuse that does not involve more problems. He has been saying he can't stand living with us anymore (unwilling to change from within himself, he always wants to change the environment) so his suggestion was that he would move out and continue paying the mortgage. Maybe he will, but I'm not holding my breath...
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#12 Old 10-22-2007, 02:37 PM
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PS-- sorry for being so long... LOL... it's like now that I have started posting about it, I am pouring it all out... it also makes me feel better to be talking to people who know what it feels like.
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#13 Old 10-22-2007, 02:51 PM
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Too long, nah, this is a majorly psychologically interesting thread (although obviously we're not making it into just a story)
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#14 Old 10-22-2007, 03:27 PM
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That's a tough situation. From what I've learned in my social work training, the phobias you listed are among the easiest to cure. Most phobias are very easily curable and can be done in a time limiting way that doesn't involve discussing any other life issues whatsoever. (If that would make the idea any more reasonable to him) I bet if he was willing to try and work on one of his phobias, he'd feel a lot better and want to get relief from the rest of them.



I have a single phobia (which I don't really care to discuss) that is actually among the few that do not respond at all to treatment. From the perspective of someone with a phobia though, I doubt he wants to stay a phobic, but if phobias are bad enough, getting treatment for them is just as bad as having one in the first place since it forces you to face them. Though I have to say if there was effective treatment for mine, I'd probably try it, even though I'm really pretty high functioning despite it.



I don't know how constructive any of that is, but maybe it'll give you a bit of perspective. I'm sorry you're having such a rough time with your husband.

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#15 Old 10-22-2007, 03:39 PM
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I'd say that was quite constructive and gave perspective yes.



Quote:
Originally Posted by rabid_child View Post

Most phobias are very easily curable and can be done in a time limiting way that doesn't involve discussing any other life issues whatsoever.

Wouldn't that be refreshing ! ....but easily curable, are you sure ?? You mentioned one yourself that ain't !! but its cool I don't wanna discuss mine any more than you do on the boards, or whoever with phobias that don't have enemies here on VB that can be bold AND have the ability to speak freely.



Anyway.... good to vent Miss Belgium for you!
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#16 Old 10-22-2007, 03:46 PM
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I'd say that was quite constructive and gave perspective yes.



Quote:
Originally Posted by rabid_child View Post

Most phobias are very easily curable and can be done in a time limiting way that doesn't involve discussing any other life issues whatsoever.

Wouldn't that be refreshing ! ....but easily curable, are you sure ?? You mentioned one yourself that ain't !! but its cool I don't wanna discuss mine any more than you do on the boards, or whoever with phobias that don't have enemies here on VB that can be bold AND have the ability to speak freely.



Anyway.... good to vent Miss Belgium for you!
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#17 Old 10-22-2007, 09:12 PM
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And I can very well have a full understanding of all these problems but that still doesn't solve MY problem, which is finding a way out of the abuse that does not involve more problems. He has been saying he can't stand living with us anymore (unwilling to change from within himself, he always wants to change the environment) so his suggestion was that he would move out and continue paying the mortgage. Maybe he will, but I'm not holding my breath...



Instead of him leaving the house and continuing to pay the mortgage, maybe you should go?

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#18 Old 10-23-2007, 12:06 AM
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He "hates" the house (doesn't trust it, it doesn't feel "safe" for him) so I doubt he'd care to stay in it, but I am afraid if I leave, he'll try something just to spite me... he is very twisted. And if I go, where will I go ??? I can't afford anything decent on a permanent basis with the debt I have on the house now, and going back to live with my parents at 45 with a 6 year-old child is not really my first choice.



I don't think he'd go for any confrontational kind of therapy at all. There are other ways (reprogramming of the mind through NLP or the like) to treat phobia quite effectively I think. The problem is he refuses any kind of therapy. Especially if I suggest it. It's too bad he doesn't have anyone close (friend, relative) who can talk him into trying something. He has halfheartedly tried a couple of therapists since I know him but stopped going each time they came close to the core anxiety problem... he seems to want to protect his anxiety at whatever price.



It keeps baffling me how anyone reasonably intelligent would choose to live like this, in permanent fear and using all their energy in devising ways to avoid "danger" and to manipulate the people around them. What a waste !
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#19 Old 10-23-2007, 03:01 AM
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Well now, thats that question out the way then I guess OR IS IT??.... And if there is an "AND WHAT ELSE", maybe now we could argue that NO-WHERE is safe for him, even unto him you might find, do you know?



This is not aimed at anyone (nor even myself especially), but listen to this: It sure is funky how-somehow-SOME people can waste their time on VB (maybe me) for I am one of the few that will I bet you admits that yet actually clocks the similarity to some extent in general terms of how mindset takes over .... (hmmmmm).... and quite likely a lot of other people besides on internet forums who might very well also be people that way. By which I mean on ONE level, channeling energy where it is perhaps not doing much good. I feel like this about VB a lot of the time. But I've clocked it for some time now, and I'm aware of it, so awareness of what used to blind sublimation is at least an improvement (just giving you a psychological perspective).
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#20 Old 10-23-2007, 03:04 AM
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Well now, thats that question out the way then I guess OR IS IT??.... And if there is an "AND WHAT ELSE", maybe now we could argue that NO-WHERE is safe for him, even unto him you might find, do you know?



---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

(HERE if you want OP, here is insight from a psychological perspective, you can perhaps use..... ).



This is not aimed at anyone (nor even myself especially), but listen to this: It sure is funky how-somehow-SOME people can waste their time on VB (maybe me) for I am one of the few that will

I bet you admits that yet actually clocks the similarity to some extent in general terms of how mindset takes over as maybe natural as maybe concious or whatever .... (hmmmmm).... and quite likely a lot of other people besides on internet forums who might very well also be people that way seduced by illness!!! damn right it would seem that way, like an illness or actually as an illness. By having distraction, the typical internet forum can have the effect for a long term user of it, yah???? and where be the mind sets its own calculation of REASON even if that reason is actually irrational (in common perception at least could be).

Things by which I mean on ONE level, channeling energy where it is perhaps not doing much good. I feel like this about VB a lot of the time. But I've clocked it for some time now, and I'm aware of it, so awareness of what used to be blind sublimation (in my experience or not, its a given generally you might think and you'd be right I think we are sublime creatures a lot of the time).... SOOOO given my awareness of some appreciable kind, and *if* we accept using ME as an example in part, I am therefore at least an improvement upon my former habitual strongholding of self deemership/ or weakness where actuality reigns and where truth may reign... THAT IS: however its perceived by the sufferer him/herself....



(THERE if you want OP, that was just giving you a psychological perspective, using what knowledge brings me from out wildnerness, and back or inbetween being in the wilderness Or "Psychological Suburbia" or whatever appropiate to the individual!!.... ).
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#21 Old 10-23-2007, 10:58 AM
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He "hates" the house (doesn't trust it, it doesn't feel "safe" for him) so I doubt he'd care to stay in it, but I am afraid if I leave, he'll try something just to spite me... he is very twisted. And if I go, where will I go ??? I can't afford anything decent on a permanent basis with the debt I have on the house now, and going back to live with my parents at 45 with a 6 year-old child is not really my first choice.



Do you feel as though you have other choices at this stage?



I don't have any children but if I did, I know I would be fiercely protective of them and I would be doing whatever it took to get them out of this situation. Seeing you being abused, manipulated and living in fear is probably going to impact on your daughter's development quite significantly in the long run. Personally, I'd rather lose a house and go bankrupt than put my kid through that.

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#22 Old 10-23-2007, 12:13 PM
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Pixelle-- I don't know why but I feel very strongly about this house. It has a lot of land, an orchard, and meets a lot of what I call 'essential qualities'. Let's say that if worst came to worst, we could feed ourselves off the land mainly. Something which has been at the back of my mind for a while now... That's why I try to hang on I suppose. I know my child is the absolute priority but right now he is still OK with the kid. Tonight I have this feeling that I will make it, with the house, somehow. I don't know. Maybe I am being overly optimistic. BTW "going bankrupt" is not really a concept here, one can not declare bancruptcy as a private person down here.



Goth... geez... talk about wilderness... errrr... what exactly were you trying to say ??
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#23 Old 10-23-2007, 12:31 PM
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I know my child is the absolute priority but right now he is still OK with the kid.



Do you feel that living with the threat of him burning down the house or his other manipulative and abusive behaviours is "being OK with the kid"? To be honest, it doesn't really sound that way to me from the way you presented his problems in your post.

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#24 Old 10-23-2007, 12:58 PM
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Goth... geez... talk about wilderness... errrr... what exactly were you trying to say ??



as in how I thought it might relate to you (indirectly) ....and/OR, just the fact mental illness presents many complex issues?



are you sure you want me to repeat/explain ?



Really most of the answer was the one line underlined as the bottomline... "what perceived by the sufferer him/herself".... yah dude? (excuse me for saying "yah dude") and so I was giving idea of how forum aka ~VB/internet in general addictiveness~ might hold some sort of relevance and the psychology behind that for me, perhaps/associable or usable by you as maybe a pyschological tool (perspective mainly).... but whatever perspective I thought might be helpful, it AT LEAST MIGHT HELP, RIGHT??....and the perspective I talk about is not one that dies easily or goes away, and therefore is ingrained in person, so IMO that could easily relate to how your hubby is, should anything about him carry those tendancies... (which obviously I feel possible)

(My aim of what I said was very not +of course+ that you're addicted to forums you understand as that would be a slight miscomprehension (or slightly off target anyway) if you got that as the answer, but however= addiction/obsession was sort of the theme of my post you see?)....



Anyway Aside from my own cognitive wheeling and dealing, what I said saved short of naming anybody nor having anybody in mind in particular except borrowing you my own mind but it seems to have made you kind of miss the point huh?.. heh.
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#25 Old 10-23-2007, 01:07 PM
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I think I have some idea of what he is capable of. So far, just words. I promise I'll run like hell if it goes any farther than that but I doubt he'll have the guts. He's quite pathetic really. His drama is always extreme and then he comes down and is quite normal again for a while. The reason I started this discussion is that I think his phobia have reached some sort of maximum here. I can be very understanding about people's "weird" traits. But... this is as far as I go, because from here on, it's psychosis. The phobia are taking over our lives. That is why I started posting. I guess there's really only 2 choices here: either he does something about it, or I do something about it... Basically I was wondering WHAT tools are available to do something about phobia, remember ?
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#26 Old 10-23-2007, 01:14 PM
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Umph Goth... LOL ! He did say a few days ago that we were reaching some sort of turning point. He may have been referring to himself and his anxiety at that stage. I guess so. I did sense that we were hitting some kind of ceiling there. There's only one way it can go from here and that's down...



Will keep ya posted. And of course there are many aspects to all kinds of minds, even "sane" ones.
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#27 Old 10-23-2007, 01:29 PM
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btw, Not least to say is that you've had to make a lot information known in your posts, so I congratulate you for handling the information well on appearances, in how you got across what are a myriad of issues in your thread here.... I have merely come at one corner of the spectrum.



ps, oops, I posted after you, this ^^ was meant to snuggle in behind my post, nevermind, read my post as is here just the same
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#28 Old 10-23-2007, 01:33 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by missbelgium View Post

I can be very understanding about people's "weird" traits. But... this is as far as I go, because from here on, it's psychosis.



sure, i understand that psychosis is the point which is to be feared.... but remember its dead horrid for the person experiencing it too.



yes I am quite aware "phobia" is the main theme... (in as far as that we know for sure?)
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#29 Old 10-23-2007, 01:42 PM
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Dunno about psychosis, ime quite often the person experiencing it doesn't remember afterwards (or blocks it out)...
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#30 Old 10-23-2007, 01:52 PM
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may not remember at the time either, even if "madness" is a relief or a source of supposed truth or justice or comfort or whatever it means to the individual.



Basicly I would say psychosis is a deep fry... (and anything said about it in such brevity is bound to sound blunt, so be aware of that, there is obviously a lot going in a person's mind who is ill, even in a depressed or sub-dued mind)
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