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#1 Old 01-31-2009, 08:15 AM
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Has anyone had any experience with such a thing.



We took our laney to the vet and she as a bump on her ear that has grown somewhat since we got her and the vet said it looked like a type of "tumor" that puppies sometimes get and that we should have it taken off it is grew to double its size. I cant remember what he called it.



Taking it off would disfigure her as it is on her ear and part of her ear would have to be removed. So, I dont want to do it unless we have to. But, I will if it grows.



I have e-mailed the vet and hopefully they will give me a guesstimate as to how much this procedure will cost me.
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#2 Old 01-31-2009, 09:53 AM
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we had a puppy with a little skin tag type tumour. the vet just put a rubber band ariund it and it fell off.
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#3 Old 01-31-2009, 09:56 AM
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luv4sheep I don't think it is the same thing

Anyway, I would do it because even though part of her ear will be gone you won't have to constantly check it and make sure that it is not growing...ect.

^Cool story, bro
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#4 Old 01-31-2009, 09:59 AM
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Originally Posted by luv4sheep View Post

we had a puppy with a little skin tag type tumour. the vet just put a rubber band ariund it and it fell off.



the vet said something about that ... it seems kinda odd to do that though. I think he was joking.
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#5 Old 01-31-2009, 10:00 AM
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Originally Posted by FreestylePup View Post

luv4sheep I don't think it is the same thing

Anyway, I would do it because even though part of her ear will be gone you won't have to constantly check it and make sure that it is not growing...ect.



true. I will love her even if she is missing part of her ear.
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#6 Old 01-31-2009, 10:03 AM
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my line of thought would be:



-is the tumour going to cause the pup any negative effects (eg: annoyance, pain, itching, other risk to her health) if you leave it alone? if it keeps growing, i think it will.



-is removing it going to negatively affect function of the pups ear (hearing, etc) more than leaving it would? i don't think so, if the vet is recommending it.



-is the pup going to give a monkeys when she looks in the mirror and sees that a bit of her ear isn't there? is she going to be all ashamed amongst the other pups and want to grow her hair long so they can't see it, and feel all inadequate? i doubt it very much. she's not a person.



-if the vet says it needs to go, it probably does. if i'm worried about my pup not being so pretty when she's done, i need to remember that she's not an accessory who is around for my aesthetic gratification.
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#7 Old 01-31-2009, 10:05 AM
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Originally Posted by dont_eat_bambi View Post

the vet said something about that ... it seems kinda odd to do that though. I think he was joking.



nope. no joke. its just like they do with babies umbilical cords. cut off the blood supply, the tissue dies, the thing drops off. this is the same reason why you shouldn't tie bits of string or elastic bands really tightly around your fingers.
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#8 Old 01-31-2009, 10:22 AM
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yeah, its probably because its mostly a farm vet, so the treatment for anthing tends to be the cheapest. Farmers will not pay more than they absolutely have too.



Thats how I tailed and castrated my sheep too.
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#9 Old 01-31-2009, 10:23 AM
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Originally Posted by hoodedclawjen View Post


-if the vet says it needs to go, it probably does. if i'm worried about my pup not being so pretty when she's done, i need to remember that she's not an accessory who is around for my aesthetic gratification.



My puppy is like a human. She is like my child. she is more than an animal that I care for on a daily basis. I don't care what she looks like as long as she is healthy.



also, the vet said it only needs to be done if it keeps growing. There is also no point in putting her through an unneccesary surgery.
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#10 Old 01-31-2009, 11:29 AM
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Your puppy is NOT a human. I love my animals to death, they are my world, they are my children. They are not humans, and I would never want them to be. You need to worry about her health first, and not if she's going to look funny. Hopefully you can get it taken care of, and it won't cause her any problems/discomfort. Good luck to you both.
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#11 Old 01-31-2009, 11:48 AM
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errmm I know she isnt a human. I said she was like a human.
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#12 Old 01-31-2009, 09:00 PM
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Originally Posted by hoodedclawjen View Post

nope. no joke. its just like they do with babies umbilical cords. cut off the blood supply, the tissue dies, the thing drops off. this is the same reason why you shouldn't tie bits of string or elastic bands really tightly around your fingers.



I looked up information on this sort of thing and was throughly grossed out by animal cruelty cases. Some of which involved tail docking and over all stupidity.
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#13 Old 02-01-2009, 07:40 AM
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Originally Posted by dont_eat_bambi View Post

I looked up information on this sort of thing and was throughly grossed out by animal cruelty cases. Some of which involved tail docking and over all stupidity.



It is actually one of the best ways to dock sheeps tails, and castrate young lambs. Thats how I did mine. Obviously it would be better to anaesthetise them and do it surgically, but we couldnt do that because

1) my mum would refuse to pay, or let me pay, for something that can be done for free.

2) the vet would take a lot of persuasion to do it, and would think we were really weird. They would just laugh off our suggestion, like they did when my mums friend wanted anaesthetic when her pet ram was castrated as an adult (it is illegal to use elastrators (rubber band) after 1 week of age), they just cut and leave an open wound while the animal is awake.



And its better because

1) For tail docking it is not terribly painful - in fact the lambs do not behave any differently or show any pain at all afterwards, and for castrating they will be in pain for maybe two hours - after this the blood supply is completely cut off so the tissue dies and has no feeling.



2) the tail/ testis come off cleanly and there is no wound that can get infected or fly struck.
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#14 Old 02-01-2009, 09:02 AM
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Originally Posted by luv4sheep View Post

It is actually one of the best ways to dock sheeps tails, and castrate young lambs. Thats how I did mine. Obviously it would be better to anaesthetise them and do it surgically, but we couldnt do that because

1) my mum would refuse to pay, or let me pay, for something that can be done for free.



Then you shouldn't have had them or done it.
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#15 Old 02-01-2009, 11:28 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dont_eat_bambi View Post

Has anyone had any experience with such a thing.



We took our laney to the vet and she as a bump on her ear that has grown somewhat since we got her and the vet said it looked like a type of "tumor" that puppies sometimes get and that we should have it taken off it is grew to double its size. I cant remember what he called it.



Taking it off would disfigure her as it is on her ear and part of her ear would have to be removed. So, I dont want to do it unless we have to. But, I will if it grows.



I have e-mailed the vet and hopefully they will give me a guesstimate as to how much this procedure will cost me.



How old is your puppy? Did your vet call it a histiocytoma? Is is raised, red and about 1 cm (1/4-1/2 inch) across? Did your vet put a needle in it and get some cells to try to better identify it?



Histiocytomas usually go away on their own and putting your pup through surgery is unnecessary unless it gets much bigger or seems to be bothersome. I personally would leave it alone as ears can be tricky to heal sometimes and your baby will need to wear an e-collar ("sattilite dish") to prevent scratching at it. E-collars tend to be very painful on the family's shins as well.



If a growth has a very narrow base, you can tie a string around it and allow it to die and fall off. This is sometimes prefered to a risky or expensive surgery. I did this to a growth on my sister once and the growth was a little sensitive (even before the string was tied), but it fell off quickly and healed up just fine.
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#16 Old 02-01-2009, 11:49 AM
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Originally Posted by cheekywhiskers View Post

How old is your puppy? Did your vet call it a histiocytoma? Is is raised, red and about 1 cm (1/4-1/2 inch) across? Did your vet put a needle in it and get some cells to try to better identify it?



Histiocytomas usually go away on their own and putting your pup through surgery is unnecessary unless it gets much bigger or seems to be bothersome. I personally would leave it alone as ears can be tricky to heal sometimes and your baby will need to wear an e-collar ("sattilite dish") to prevent scratching at it. E-collars tend to be very painful on the family's shins as well.



If a growth has a very narrow base, you can tie a string around it and allow it to die and fall off. This is sometimes prefered to a risky or expensive surgery. I did this to a growth on my sister once and the growth was a little sensitive (even before the string was tied), but it fell off quickly and healed up just fine.



oooh, yes that is I believe exactly what he called it. It is a wide circle type type unfortunately. I measured it today and hopefully it won't keep growing. He didn't poke a needle in it no. We have to go back in about 3 months for her heart worm preventative . If it doesn't grow I will have him take another peek at it then.
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#17 Old 02-01-2009, 12:10 PM
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Then you shouldn't have had them or done it.



Do you mean I shouldnt have got my sheep? I think I must have interpreted you wrong. To let them get docked and castrated by the farmer, and then fattened up and killed at six months old is obviously better for their welfare...



It has to be done, because if they are not castrated they become very aggressive and dangerous especially to the people who have reared them. And if you dont dock their tails, they get very dirty and fly stuck, which is when flies lay their eggs next to the skin and the maggots bury into their skin. This can be fatal if not treated as the maggots produce lots of toxins. It also causes a lot more pain than having their tails docked ever did.



Its not like dog tail docking, where it is done mainly for looks, and some people argue also for their health. No one would ever argue that tail docking is not best for sheep. Long tails, like long wool are a mistake if you ask me anyway.



Luckily soay sheep dont have long tails (as they are similar to wild sheep) so they dont need to be docked.
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#18 Old 02-02-2009, 03:24 PM
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Originally Posted by luv4sheep View Post

Do you mean I shouldnt have got my sheep? I think I must have interpreted you wrong. To let them get docked and castrated by the farmer, and then fattened up and killed at six months old is obviously better for their welfare...



It has to be done, because if they are not castrated they become very aggressive and dangerous especially to the people who have reared them. And if you dont dock their tails, they get very dirty and fly stuck, which is when flies lay their eggs next to the skin and the maggots bury into their skin. This can be fatal if not treated as the maggots produce lots of toxins. It also causes a lot more pain than having their tails docked ever did.



Its not like dog tail docking, where it is done mainly for looks, and some people argue also for their health. No one would ever argue that tail docking is not best for sheep. Long tails, like long wool are a mistake if you ask me anyway.



Luckily soay sheep dont have long tails (as they are similar to wild sheep) so they dont need to be docked.



I meant that if you (or your family) aren't willing to pay for proper surgery you shouldn't have animals. The fact that it does hurt than that there is an alternative avalible but you wouldn't pay is what upset me. I didn't know how you got your animals, so don't imply that I would rather them be killed and eaten. I understand it wasn't really your decision, but your parents, and an alternative may have not been as easy.
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#19 Old 02-02-2009, 03:49 PM
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I meant that if you (or your family) aren't willing to pay for proper surgery you shouldn't have animals. The fact that it does hurt than that there is an alternative avalible but you wouldn't pay is what upset me. I didn't know how you got your animals, so don't imply that I would rather them be killed and eaten. I understand it wasn't really your decision, but your parents, and an alternative may have not been as easy.



To be honest, surgery would have probably caused not much less pain. When they castrate large animals (even horses) they just leave an open wound which certainly looks painful. I really dont think the vet would have done it anyway. Their is absolutely no way my mum would have done it anyway, she hates going to the vet and I absolutely had to beg her when my other lambs were ill (they later died despite over £200 veterinary treatment which I paid for) and when Piper had urinary calculi. Its sad, but in the country people have a different mindset including the vets. Farm animals are seen just for money, and people will laugh if you treat them otherwise. We are a joke for not sending my boys to market when they were fat enough, and the first things anyone said to us when we got them was either "they are going to die. Pet lambs always die" or "So are you going to take them to market or butcher them yourselves"
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#20 Old 02-02-2009, 08:12 PM
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Originally Posted by luv4sheep View Post

To be honest, surgery would have probably caused not much less pain. When they castrate large animals (even horses) they just leave an open wound which certainly looks painful. I really dont think the vet would have done it anyway. Their is absolutely no way my mum would have done it anyway, she hates going to the vet and I absolutely had to beg her when my other lambs were ill (they later died despite over £200 veterinary treatment which I paid for) and when Piper had urinary calculi. Its sad, but in the country people have a different mindset including the vets. Farm animals are seen just for money, and people will laugh if you treat them otherwise. We are a joke for not sending my boys to market when they were fat enough, and the first things anyone said to us when we got them was either "they are going to die. Pet lambs always die" or "So are you going to take them to market or butcher them yourselves"



I know the mindset (I live in the country, pretty much the only things in my town are farms). I'm sorry for snapping at you, too. I know it's not your fault, and I see above where you mentioned the surgery not being much better (I didn't see that before). I didnt mean to make you feel like you had to defend yourself or that you're a bad person (I think you're a wonderful, compassionate person) and my posts were really mean. So I am sorry!



I'm sorry people said that to you. People are so rude. Everyone around here looks at me like this: for having a fenced in yard for our dogs and walking them on leashes. The horror!
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#21 Old 02-03-2009, 03:49 AM
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dont worry about it! You only said that because you care about animals. no offence taken honestly!
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#22 Old 02-03-2009, 03:51 PM
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Originally Posted by luv4sheep View Post

To be honest, surgery would have probably caused not much less pain. When they castrate large animals (even horses) they just leave an open wound which certainly looks painful. I really dont think the vet would have done it anyway. Their is absolutely no way my mum would have done it anyway, she hates going to the vet and I absolutely had to beg her when my other lambs were ill (they later died despite over £200 veterinary treatment which I paid for) and when Piper had urinary calculi. Its sad, but in the country people have a different mindset including the vets. Farm animals are seen just for money, and people will laugh if you treat them otherwise. We are a joke for not sending my boys to market when they were fat enough, and the first things anyone said to us when we got them was either "they are going to die. Pet lambs always die" or "So are you going to take them to market or butcher them yourselves"



Ohmygosh! That's awful - the last bit I mean! Someone on the news made the stupidest joke once - they were talking about kunekune pigs, and the news guy said, "And if they get sick, you can always cure them". You know, cure as in smoke or whatever? Ugh! I hate that guy!



When I bought Jazz [goat kid], he already had a ring on his bits. It didn't seem to hurt him at all. It just fell off after a few weeks and he probably didn't even notice. The wound heals really quick too, I couldn't even find the bit where it came off. As for tail docking, it's actually good, sometimes. The sheep don't really care if they have a short tail. With long tails, when they're wooly, they get really daggy which attracts flies. our sheep, who werent docked, used to get really daggy so I would shave their tails which seemed to work.
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#23 Old 02-13-2009, 04:48 PM
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so back to my original post.



Laney is going to have about half of her ear taken off on Monday. I drop her off at 730 and pick her up after 2:30. I am happy that we are getting this taken care of. I feel bad for her though. Poor baby.
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#24 Old 02-13-2009, 10:48 PM
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so back to my original post.



Laney is going to have about half of her ear taken off on Monday. I drop her off at 730 and pick her up after 2:30. I am happy that we are getting this taken care of. I feel bad for her though. Poor baby.



Aww. Good luck, Laney!
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#25 Old 02-16-2009, 11:55 PM
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How did the surgery go? Did it go well? I hope so. Poor thing.
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#26 Old 02-17-2009, 05:14 AM
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yeah. She has to wear a cone. They did a pretty good job with making her ear look pretty normal. I have to wait a few weeks until they can tell me about the biopsy they did cause It had to be sent off to a lab. Im worrying about her being in the house today . she cant fit in her kennel and I dont want her to be outside with that cone on her head. I wish I could stay home with her. Maybe If I whine enough... I could be here with her and make she she doesn't hurt herself. I moved all the obvious things out of her way. I just hope I didnt miss something.
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#27 Old 02-17-2009, 07:34 PM
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Good luck to her in her recovery process!
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#28 Old 02-21-2009, 06:33 AM
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*bump*



so how about we have been having to leave this doggie run free when we are not here inside the house because when we aren't home we have her wear the cone and she can't fit insdie her very large kennel/cage because the cone is too wide.



well, she keeps pooping in the house now. It took us two months to get her to not go inside the house when we adopted her and now here she is pooping in the house again. She has only peed once or twice (she knows how to wait til the proper time) but do you think she is just reacting to having to be in the house or that maybe she is trying to tell me something isn't right? She acts like a pretty normal 10 month old pup besides the pooping.



We normally put her in her doggie kennel outside when we aren't home and it isn't raining or storming.



I have been being firm and doing all the nooo when I catch her. I understand if she can't hold it in when we aren't here but we get up and take her out when she does what she does when she has to go. She isn't giving any warning for the poop. Just going where she feels like it. argghh.



I am sorry if I am missing something obvious about her behavior. I haven't taken care of a dog pretty much ever except for when I was a kid and I have had kitties and understand their potty habits but not those of a canine so any help would be appreciated.
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#29 Old 02-21-2009, 06:46 AM
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that was the day of the surgery
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