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#1 Old 10-06-2008, 10:10 PM
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I'll most likely be moving into an apartment after I graduate and am considering getting a dog. I don't want any toy dogs. I've been looking at whippets, and they seem fairly well-suited for apartments. The only problem is that I will be away at work for eight hours a day. What are some good breeds for apartments?

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#2 Old 10-06-2008, 10:40 PM
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If you are going to be away 8 hrs a day , assuming no one else will be there . Why make a dog suffer . Are you going to keep it in a cage ? .
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#3 Old 10-06-2008, 10:55 PM
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If your situation is one that you have to look at particular breeds to suit just your needs, then consider not getting a dog at all. You should always be looking at the dog's needs first and foremost.
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#4 Old 10-06-2008, 11:15 PM
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I have an Italian greyhound-- which is similar to a Whippet, I also have a Chihuahua. I have always known that I would move around a lot, so I trained them to use a litter tray so they wouldn't have to hold it. I have worked sometimes 12 hours, and sometimes am stuck over night. All dogs can be taught how to use a litter pan/ litter tray. Dogs also sleep about 12 to 16 hours a day naturally, so they would be sacked out while you are gone. My IG is a perfect apartment dog. She is small but not tiny. She loves to go out for a walk, but she is just as happy laying around not doing anything. Litter box training is relatively pain free, but you need to get the dog young enough to make it easy. Puppies are going to go to the bathroom a lot and have accidents-- and a single puppy will be lonely. There is a lot to having a dog. It is like having a stubborn 2 year old who will never grow up. Dogs are very adaptable. Good Luck.
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#5 Old 10-06-2008, 11:38 PM
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Large dogs who can live well in apartments are Great Danes, Newfies, St. Bernards, and other couch potato types. Most breeds have rescue groups, so please look in shelters for dogs that are crossbreeds of these types, or purebreds that have been surrendered to a pure breed rescue. These giants will not be bouncing off the walls and driving you nuts the way lots of smaller, seemingly apartment sized dogs can do. I know a St. Bernard-German Shepherd mix, a couple of Newfies, and a Great Dane who all live in tiny homes and are very happy and well adjusted dogs.



But the best thing is to adopt a Greyhound who can't race anymore. They are total couch potatoes, and are quite accustomed to being kept in crates all their miserable racing lives. They are so sick of racing that all they want to do is sleep on a nice, warm, cozy couch. You can hardly even get them to run if you take them to the dog park and let 'em loose. They are sweet, loving dogs, and are killed when they cannot race anymore. I've known several, and the rescue groups that save them are staffed with knowledgeable people who will be able to help you. And if you only want one dog, an ex-racer, many of whom are not socialized with other dogs at all, will be happy to have the apartment all to him or herself.

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#6 Old 10-07-2008, 01:44 AM
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If you're REALLY flexible, you might consider a cat instead.



I'm just saying.

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#7 Old 10-07-2008, 01:50 AM
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I was about to say what Amy SF said. I'd get a cat or two. I'm a huge dog lover but I have cats or that very reason. (Also, I'm a cat lover )

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#8 Old 10-07-2008, 04:12 AM
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I would say that rather than buying a puppy of any breed (who would need a lot of time, training and love to grow up happy and healthy - puppies cant hold their bladders for 8hrs for a start so toilet training would be slow) go to a rescue and get an older dog. Greyhounds and whippets are good dogs for someone with limited space as they only need one or two good walks a day and they will be happy flopped on the sofa for the rest. Greyhounds are especially easy to find as there are lots of shelters just for retired racers. alternatively look for a small dog.

The shelter will help you find one with a character suited to your lifestyle. although I know in britain a shelter wouldnt let you take a dog if you are going to be out for 8hrs a day. Some dogs get into the routine of bieng left alone with no trouble at all, but many get really worried and upset. remember that you cant tell a dog you are out at work, so at first it will think it has been abandoned for good. Thats when you get behaviour issues like dogs ripping up your house with the stress.
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#9 Old 10-07-2008, 06:23 AM
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I have no idea.. I'm a cat person... I just wanted to remind people who are down on adopting dogs in apartments/if you work -- it's better than living in a cage at a shelter or being euthanized! Unless the OP is planning on getting a dog from a pet shop or breeder (neither were mentioned), I have no problem with a rescue dog living in an apartment with a working owner.



That said, you may want to first consider the practical aspect of having a pet in an apartment -- at least around here, it is VERY difficult to find someplace that will rent to pet owners, dogs or cats. Do a bit of research in the area you will be living to find out if it's possible to find a pet friendly place in your price range.

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#10 Old 10-07-2008, 07:39 AM
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My parents have a greyhound, so I know how they can be. She just lies around all day. =P I was looking at a whippet because they are similar to greyhounds, in that they like to lie around all day, but are a bit more active and social. If I do get a dog, it will be from a rescue and not some horrible puppy mill. I'd like to get one that around 2 years old and already housebroken. The only thing that concerns me is that whippets need lots of exercise. I don't mind walking him a few times a day, but a few websites said they need a large fenced-in area to run around in. Will walking them during the week and maybe taking them to a dog park on the weekend be okay?

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#11 Old 10-07-2008, 11:46 AM
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Well, if a particular sort of dog needs a large fenced in area then that is what he or she needs.

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#12 Old 10-07-2008, 11:52 AM
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I don't really have suggestions on which breed you should get, but have you thought about adopting 2 dogs? That way they will have a buddy to hang out with while you are at work.
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#13 Old 10-07-2008, 11:55 AM
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The walks will probably be fine. Yes he/she would probably like a garden, but if they are from a shelter they will not have had acess to gardens so will not miss it. Two walks a day is more exercise than many dogs get.
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#14 Old 10-07-2008, 12:29 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lovey View Post

I don't really have suggestions on which breed you should get, but have you thought about adopting 2 dogs? That way they will have a buddy to hang out with while you are at work.



I would seriously not advise this, i've seen it go horribly wrong far too many times.





The absolute key thing you need to do SonicEarth is research!!! I cannot stress how important it is to look at things like breeds, ages, training and general care before you get a dog, it will save you so much stress and heartache in the future.



I like whippets, they are calm spirited little dogs but you cannot forget that they have been designed 100% to chase and kill and you need to understand this basic drive to control it. The best thing you can do is go meet some whippet owners and their dogs and ask loads of questions about the breed. You could go visit breeders and fanciers even if you have no intention of buying a dog from them.



Finally you need to consider if you are suitable for a dog at all. How much time realisticly will you have to dedicate to a dog? Take into account the time you spend working, sleeping, eating, shopping, cleaning and socialising. Do you have the funds to support a dog? Will you be able to cope if a dog develops a behavoural or health issue? Will you be able to provide the mental a physical stimulation a dog requires?
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#15 Old 10-07-2008, 01:37 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lovey View Post

I don't really have suggestions on which breed you should get, but have you thought about adopting 2 dogs? That way they will have a buddy to hang out with while you are at work.



This can be a good idea for some people and not for others. Sometimes you can find a pair of older dogs that are being adopted out together, they may be genetically related or through adoption. Some smaller, less active breeds are shih tzus, Cavaliers, Lhasa Apso and dachshunds. If you are adopting older dog(s), you can get an idea of their activity level before you adopt. Some individuals from "active" breeds can be quite calm and vice versa.



If you're not too picky about the species of your companions, you could also try cats, rabbits, guinea pigs, ferrets, chinchillas or even rats (my choice if I was in your situation). Just make sure you get a same sex pair and/or surgically sterilize one or both.



It sounds like you're already doing research about dogs before you make your choice. Remember this choice will be part of your life for possibly over 10 years and will make or break the life of the animal.
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#16 Old 10-07-2008, 02:35 PM
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It was just a suggestion. Two of my dogs that I got around the same time frame became the best of buddies and they are pretty much inseparable. I don't know what they would do without each other. One is a black lab, the other a golden lab mix.
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#17 Old 10-07-2008, 03:16 PM
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Lhasa Apso



My dog is probably a lhasa-mix. He's a bit big for the breed (22 pounds) but he's a very good dog. I didn't train him-- I adopted him a few months ago and he's 7. Apparently, they are pretty smart, especially if he was trained so well by people who didn't pay him much attention.



He can use a pet pad, but he's never used it at my house. He's playful, but he gets tired and isn't itching to run around outside. I've got nothing of a yard (Townhouse) and he's perfectly content. He gets his biggest exercise at the disc golf park.



I have heard from people who've had them that lhasa's are way more mellow than shih-tzu's. Mine's way chill and mellow.



Wouldn't recommend a German Shepard...
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#18 Old 10-07-2008, 08:57 PM
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I don't understand what would be wrong with a mix anyway.
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#19 Old 10-07-2008, 08:59 PM
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definately see what your local shelter has to offer before settling on a specific breed. always good to research a breed before adopting one to make sure it will suit you, so go in or call and see what they've got, do some research on the ones you like most and make a decision from there. an adult dog will be much easier to manage if you're not home all day as long as it doesn't have any issues from its previous owners (ie rescued from an abusive owner, may have problems adjusting). if you are set on a specific breed look for a rescue organization that deals with that breed specifically (there are greyhound rescues out there for sure), you may have to go out of town to get it but it's worth saving one that might not have a chance otherwise rather than supporting breeders to make more puppies, and they will have adults that are in desperate need of homes.



be prepared though some shelters won't adopt out a dog to someone who is gone for much of the day. are you able to go home on lunch to let the dog out and spend some time with him/her?

anyway our pup was semi crate trained and worked out well. we had her crate set up in the kitchen with blankets in it but we left the door open with food and water and peepads and then blocked off the kitchen with a safety gate. so if she had an accident it was on kitchen floor which is easiest to clean and not on furniture etc, nothing in reach for her to get into and all that. then as she got bigger and more able to hold her bladder we stopped using the peepads and if she had an accident again it was no big deal in the kitchen. we would gently scold her and take her outside. eventually we were able to stop gating her in the kitchen. we just close doors to rooms we don't want her exploring in on her own (like my 11 year old sister in law's room full of toys she'd love to shred lol). she does still make the odd mess if she's left alone all day but she's not left alone much so it's pretty rare really.

it's not all that bad as long as you expect and don't freak out over occassional messes. they're dogs, it happens. people who expect to leave their dog alone for 8 hours a day and get mad and punish the dog for pooping on the floor should not have dogs. a favourite saying of mine when she has an oops is "sh*t happens eh puppy?" but on days where she's left alone and doesn't make any messes i praise her and give her a treat of course



but yeah there are definately breeds that are less active than others. anything bulldog related tends to be pretty lazy. bull mastiffs i've heard are great apartment dogs despite their size, as they tend to be very lazy and don't require much excercise (as adults, all rules and descriptions go out the window when they're puppies lol)

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#20 Old 10-08-2008, 12:13 AM
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i was going to say a big fat dog just because i love big fat dogs.. um.. i guess no. dont get a weim and dont get a pit.. don't get a staffordshire bull terrier like me either cos my baby is so needy! she's bad too. i come downstairs and she will be in the pantry.. or stockpiling shoes.. we spend a lot of time together though and she is happy.



what about a corgi?
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#21 Old 10-08-2008, 07:41 PM
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Sealyham terrier.



Around here there aren't many apartment buildings that will allow dogs. I'm not sure how your city is but keep that in mind.
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#22 Old 10-09-2008, 08:57 AM
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Quote:
Sealyham terrier.



Many terriers like to use their voices - not great for an apartment, they were also originally developed to kill small furry things. Sealyhams can also suffer from inherited deafness, something to also consider.
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#23 Old 10-09-2008, 12:11 PM
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I would seriously not advise this, i've seen it go horribly wrong far too many times.





The absolute key thing you need to do SonicEarth is research!!! I cannot stress how important it is to look at things like breeds, ages, training and general care before you get a dog, it will save you so much stress and heartache in the future.



I like whippets, they are calm spirited little dogs but you cannot forget that they have been designed 100% to chase and kill and you need to understand this basic drive to control it. The best thing you can do is go meet some whippet owners and their dogs and ask loads of questions about the breed. You could go visit breeders and fanciers even if you have no intention of buying a dog from them.



Finally you need to consider if you are suitable for a dog at all. How much time realisticly will you have to dedicate to a dog? Take into account the time you spend working, sleeping, eating, shopping, cleaning and socialising. Do you have the funds to support a dog? Will you be able to cope if a dog develops a behavoural or health issue? Will you be able to provide the mental a physical stimulation a dog requires?



Excellent advise especially that in bold. However I would never expect a dog to spend 8 hours a day on its own without a break - its uncomfortable for the dog and they are also social animals and want to be with their pack ie you.



You have to consider your lifestyle very carefully, do you go out to friends of an evening, do you go shopping after work etc etc, this all adds to the dog being left alone with nothing to do.



Are they any dog day care centres near you or could you get a dog walker in every day?



Please think very carefully before getting a dog about the dogs needs and what you can offer it.
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#24 Old 10-11-2008, 02:46 PM
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hey terriers arent that bad. my dog is a terrier and she hardly ever barks and she doesnt dig either. She fight collies, but no other breeds.



My dad has her daughter in an apartment and she only barks when someone knocjks at the door.
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#25 Old 10-11-2008, 03:15 PM
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hey terriers arent that bad. my dog is a terrier and she hardly ever barks and she doesnt dig either. She fight collies, but no other breeds.



My dad has her daughter in an apartment and she only barks when someone knocjks at the door.



Not all dogs conform to their breed traits but traits predispose a dog of a certain breed or type to certain behavours and these definately need to be taken into account when looking for a dog.



I would guess 80% of the dogs I see about excessive barking are terriers.
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#26 Old 10-16-2008, 01:27 AM
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"Somebody Else" recommended some bigger dogs.I concur and grew up with big dogs. They call them gentle giants for a reason. Newfies are great, I grew up with one that was purebred and one half newfy and german shephard. Greyhounds sound good too.



I agree if you can't get a dog walker dont get a dog. I live in NYC and that is the only reason I don't have one. Its not fair to the dog. If you live close to where you work you could take the dog out midday so that's something to consider or get a college kid to walk the dog. Its worth it. Also, if you go with a rescue organization (my mom does lab rescue so I know this for a fact) it is unlikely they will let you adopt a dog if you wont be home during the day or have a dog walker. Too many dogs come to them because the owner works all day and doesn thave time for them and they are neglected (I am not saying you would do this at all) but that's what they think.



An older dog is a wonderful idea. They make great, calm, companions and shelters have more difficulty adopting them out. Go on petfinder.org and it will give u a list of local shelters and dogs they have for adoption. Also considerng taking the "aol dog match" quiz if its still around. But you really do want a calmer dog. I wouldn't recommend most terriers, spaniels, toy breeds, labs and goldens (even though I love them). Bulldogs are low energy but stubborn and hard to train. You will find out alot so just ask us and the dog match thing on aol is good bc they do ask stuff like "do u need the dog to be easy to train", etc.



Good luck!
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#27 Old 10-16-2008, 03:22 AM
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From experience I can say a good percentage of neutered female labs enjoy lying around in front of heaters, eating, sleeping and eating again more than anything.

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#28 Old 10-23-2008, 10:14 PM
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Hi everyone, I just joined and really wanted to reply to this thread because I can relate. My husband and I live in a very small condo with a balcony but no yard and wanted a dog for years. We found our girl at a local shelter when she was six months old - she is a lab/German Shepherd mix, very high energy, and very mischevious! (and the cutest thing in the world) She is now full grown and 75 lbs. At first glance NOT the best dog for a small condo (I hear this a lot) but I can tell you she is one of the happiest dogs I know. Instead of so many dogs that are just left in the backyard all day, she gets two long runs every day (most of these she is running free and not on a leash), as well as several short walks. She goes to the beach several times a week and chases seagulls and plays in the ocean. During the week, either my husband or I come home at lunch and walk her, so she is never left alone for more than a few hours. When she's at home with us, she is usually happily passed out on the couch because she's so pooped from running around! I guess my point is that you can absolutely have a dog in a small place, even a high energy dog, if you are truly committed to giving the dog tons of exercise and making sure he/she has a happy life. It is possible! (also, it's so much better for the dog than being stuck in the shelter waiting for a home...) On that note, I hope you will adopt when you do get a dog!! Good luck!
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#29 Old 10-24-2008, 08:27 AM
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Please don't let your dog run free in public areas. It's not really fun for little dogs to be suddenly pounced on by some big dog.
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#30 Old 10-24-2008, 10:14 AM
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Well, of course we don't let her run around wild on the street! We take her to designated beaches, dog parks and other places where all the dogs are off leash. Luckily we live in a town where there are lots of options. I have sympathy for the small dogs but at the same time, if you take your small dog to a dog park where you know there are big dogs running off-leash, you have to know that it might get "pounced on" because that is just what dogs do and how they play with each other. What, my dog is not allowed to play off-leash because you have a small dog nearby?
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