ASPCA Survey: Where did you get your dog? - VeggieBoards
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#1 Old 05-11-2007, 08:11 AM
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http://www.aspca.org/site/PageServer?pagename=dogsurvey



ASPCA survey about where people get their dogs. I believe they are collecting info to help stop puppy mills.
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#2 Old 05-11-2007, 08:28 AM
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"We need your help, canine caretakers. As part of the ASPCA’s initiative to crack down on puppy mills, we want to find out where America gets its pets."



Thanks, I filled it out.
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#3 Old 05-11-2007, 08:51 AM
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I got mine at the pound. I won't dignify the place by calling it an animal shelter. I don't guess it would do any good to fill out their study.
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#4 Old 05-11-2007, 09:28 AM
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I got mine at the pound. I won't dignify the place by calling it an animal shelter. I don't guess it would do any good to fill out their study.

Yes it will. I adopted mine from a shelter too, and the survey asks a lot of important questions about the shelter. Some things such as high adoption costs are a deterrent for many people from adopting. As well things like whether or not the animal was altered before you got it, because if not then the shelter is being irresponsible and really partly to blame for overpopulation problems in their area. And then there are the real concerns people have about how healthy a dog is when it comes from a shelter. So the ASPCA will be able to show after compiling the research that Puppy Mill dogs have more health problems than shelter dogs, or maybe that shelter dogs have more health problems than puppy mill dogs... etc.
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#5 Old 05-11-2007, 09:45 AM
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All our pets (4 cats and a dog) came from shelters, so I was happy to fill this out. Our experiences with adoptions has been great.
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#6 Old 05-11-2007, 11:40 AM
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We have 2 dogs and 1 cat. Both our dogs were adopted from the animal shelter I worked at while living in Idaho. My cat came with a house I bought. She deposited her kittens into the basement through a window. I'll fill out the survey in a bit.
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#7 Old 05-11-2007, 11:49 AM
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Originally Posted by Life2k View Post

I got mine at the pound. I won't dignify the place by calling it an animal shelter. I don't guess it would do any good to fill out their study.



They'll want to know specifically if your companion animal was spayed/neutered as part of the adoption agreement, if your dog had fleas etc. at time of adoption, that kind of thing. A good shelter makes sure all animals being adopted out of their shelter is spayed/neutered and does not have fleas etc. I worked at a shelter, and we did all we could to make sure the animals went home with the best start possible. I used to give the dogs baths right before they were scheduled to be picked up to go home. I also walked the dogs and taught them proper leash manners, etc.
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#8 Old 05-11-2007, 12:32 PM
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This is a great idea. The ASPCA and other groups can't effectively fight puppy mills without first understanding why they stay in business.



Too bad they don't have one for cats, though. My doglessness prevents me from filling out this form.

Cat #1: lives with my parents; adopted from shelter, reason for surrender: "landlord won't allow"

Cat #2: given to my boyfriend by owner who didn't want her : (

Cat #3: adopted from shelter, picked up by animal control as a stray

slops, gloops, and gruels.
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#9 Old 05-11-2007, 12:40 PM
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We got out lovely dog, Indy, from a shelter. I have always believed that shelter dogs are the best dogs! They truly appreciate their second lease on life.
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#10 Old 05-11-2007, 12:40 PM
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I filled out the survey for my pack. 3 strays and one pound puppy.
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#11 Old 05-11-2007, 02:02 PM
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I filled it out. But my report of my shelter wasn't very good. I tells um likes I sees um.
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#12 Old 05-11-2007, 07:52 PM
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Good! There are way too many bad shelters, and that's part of the problem. My shelter is awesome, but I'm trying to convince them that they're much too strict. Of course people are going to keep buying from pet stores if they get refused at shelters.
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#13 Old 05-11-2007, 09:11 PM
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One of the shelters near here borders on too picky I think. They wouldn't let my sister adopt a German shepherd puppy because she has kids. Now I agreed with that when she wanted an adult GSD who had never been around kids. But a puppy?



More than some shelters, most rescues I've come across are way too strict, IMO.



But I guess too strict is better than no restrictions at all.
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#14 Old 05-12-2007, 07:21 AM
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The shelter where I worked at, there was a huge disagreement between the director and assistant drector about adopting out puppies to homes with small children. The director wanted no exceptions made AT ALL. The assistant director was very upset about this because she felt it should be on a more case by case basis, as some children are better behaved than others, and some parents more responsible than others.
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#15 Old 05-12-2007, 07:58 AM
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I just filled it out.
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#16 Old 05-14-2007, 06:54 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wolfie View Post

More than some shelters, most rescues I've come across are way too strict, IMO.



But I guess too strict is better than no restrictions at all.



I think rescues can afford the "luxury" of setting any restrictions they want. Our unspoken motto is that if the adoptive home isn't at least a little better than the current foster care, why should we adopt? We want our rabbits to be kept indoors as companions in the family, not outside in a hutch. Sure we run into those who think our process is too time-consuming, but we make a commitment for life to the animals (they are returned when it doesn't work out), and we work very hard to educate adopters BEFORE the adoption about what they're getting into. That makes a lot of ppl decide a rabbit isn't the right pet for them after all, and that is the whole point of avoiding impulse pet store purchases (or even impulse shelter adoptions). I think anyone who makes the effort to care for a foster animal of any species gets the chance to determine if a new home is the right one.



What I find amusing/aggravating are the anti-AR folks who think rescues actually MAKE MONEY. I laugh all the way to the poorhouse on that one.
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#17 Old 05-14-2007, 07:43 AM
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Originally Posted by DieselAmy View Post

I think rescues can afford the "luxury" of setting any restrictions they want. Our unspoken motto is that if the adoptive home isn't at least a little better than the current foster care, why should we adopt?

That's a good question, but that answer is easy... You want to make allies, and you want to help all bunnies, not just your own. If you piss people off and turn lots of people away (not saying you do any of this, only speaking hypothetically) they'll end up getting bunnies from breeders or pet stores which worsens the problem, and they won't have learned anything from the process. Instead, if they can adopt from you, and you can stay in touch with them and teach them about proper care and raising you've prevented more bunnies from being bred, you've taught someone to take care of them, and you've made an ally for your cause.
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#18 Old 05-14-2007, 10:55 AM
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Originally Posted by kpickell View Post

That's a good question, but that answer is easy... You want to make allies, and you want to help all bunnies, not just your own. If you piss people off and turn lots of people away (not saying you do any of this, only speaking hypothetically) they'll end up getting bunnies from breeders or pet stores which worsens the problem, and they won't have learned anything from the process. Instead, if they can adopt from you, and you can stay in touch with them and teach them about proper care and raising you've prevented more bunnies from being bred, you've taught someone to take care of them, and you've made an ally for your cause.



Agreed, which is why we still go through the interview process with anyone who submits the application, even if we think it won't be a go (sometimes we're surprised). That's because the education opportunity is great--even if they do go get a bunny elsewhere, they know much more about its care and are likely to do a better job. Most ppl just don't know how to care for a rabbit like they do for a cat or dog, and if we convince them that they can't stay in a little cage their whole life (which is much more than a couple of years, another part they don't know), we do a lot for any rabbit to come. Our job encompasses education more than for most dog/cat rescues.



In any case, we always refer the adopter to another rescue or shelter with rabbits, where they can still get the benefit of spay/neuter but w/fewer restrictions. A lot of folks do go that route. Still more decide not to get a rabbit because they find out how much work it is, and that's great too.



Meanwhile since we've stopped the sales of rabbits in one major chain in town and the other doesn't sell them, the sources of pet store babies here are few (hooray!). But we still don't adopt to someone who doesn't believe a rabbit is "worth" taking to the vet when it is sick, etc.
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#19 Old 05-15-2007, 03:14 PM
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I got my dog at a pet store. *cringe* Never again.



He means the world to me though!
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