Dangerous foods for pets - VeggieBoards
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#1 Old 03-07-2007, 03:34 AM
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This was sent in an e-mail to me, so I don't actually know the validity of the information, but thought I would pass it on just in case there is some merit to it.



It supposedly a list from the ASPCA. Most of them are obvious but some I wouldnt have thought of.



Alcoholic beverages

Avocado

Chocolate (all forms)

Coffee (all forms)

Fatty foods

Macadamia nuts

Moldy or spoiled foods

Onions, onion powder

Raisins and grapes

Salt

Yeast dough

Garlic

Products sweetened with xylitol





Subject: FW: Raisin Poisioning in Dogs





Even if you don't have a dog, you might have friends who do. This is worth passing on to them.



(Below written by a vet)



This week I had the first case in history of raisin toxicity ever seen at MedVet. My patient was a 56-pound, 5 yr old male neutered lab mix who ate half a canister of raisins sometime between 7:30 AM and 4:30 PM on Tuesday.He started with vomiting, diarrhea and shaking about 1 AM on Wednesday but the owner didn't call my emergency service until 7AM.



I had heard somewhere about raisins AND grapes causing acute Renal failure but hadn't seen any formal paper on the subject. We had her bring the dog in immediately. In the meantime, I called the ER service at MedVet, and the doctor there was like me - had heard something about it, but....Anyway, we contacted the ASPCA National Animal Poison Control Center and they said to give IV fluids at 1 Ã,½ times maintenance and watch the kidney values for the next 48-72 hours. The dog's BUN (blood urea nitrogen level) was already at 32 (normal less than 27) and creatinine over 5 ( 1.9 is the high end of normal). Both are monitors of kidney function in the bloodstream. We placed an IV catheter and started the fluids. Rechecked the renal values at 5 PM and the BUN was over 40 and creatinine over 7 with no urine production after a liter of fluids. At the point I felt the dog was in acute renal failure and sent him on to MedVet for a urinary catheter to monitor urine output overnight as well as overnight care.



He started vomiting again overnight at MedVet and his renal values have continued to increase daily. He produced urine when given lasix as a diuretic. He was on 3 different anti-vomiting medications and they still couldn't control his vomiting. Today his urine output decreased again, his BUN was over 120, his creatinine was at 10, his phosphorus was very elevated and his blood pressure, which had been staying around 150, skyrocketed to 220.. He continued to vomit and the owners elected to euthanize.



This is a very sad case - great dog, great owners who had no idea raisins could be a toxin. Please alert everyone you know who has a dog of this very serious risk. Poison control said as few as 7 raisins or grapes could be toxic. Many people I know give their dogs grapes or raisins as treats including our ex-handler's. Any exposure should give rise to

immediate concern.



Laurinda Morris, DVM

Danville Veterinary Clinic

Danville , Ohio
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#2 Old 03-07-2007, 03:40 AM
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However, small animals such as rats and sugar gliders can have grapes, and a very small amount of avocado. ^_^



But yeah ... people would be amazed at the stuff dogs and cats can't have.
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#3 Old 03-07-2007, 03:50 AM
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I had to look up sugar gliders....too cute!!



And yes, I think it's mainly for cats and dogs...I failed to mention that!
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#4 Old 03-07-2007, 03:53 AM
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I used to have a pair of sugar gliders. Loved them.



Miss them immensely.
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#5 Old 03-07-2007, 07:25 AM
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I recognize most of those from working at the vet... Definitely a dog list, most of them are also true for cats. Don't know about things like grapes, because it's hard to get a cat to eat a grape

http://megatarian.blogspot.com
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#6 Old 03-07-2007, 07:30 AM
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Interesting. I know that avocado is supposed to be very toxic to birds.
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#7 Old 03-07-2007, 08:30 AM
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I'm pretty sure avocado is a big, big one. It's toxic to any animal if given in a little more than "small tastes". I won't give my rat more than a few nibbles of it once a month or so.
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#8 Old 03-08-2007, 03:17 PM
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"He was on 3 different anti-vomiting medications and they still couldn't control his vomiting."



Why would they give anti-vomiting medicines to an animal that ate something that was poisoning them (other than something that could seriously burn their esophagus)? Usually the give people syrup of ipecac - to MAKE them vomit.
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#9 Old 03-08-2007, 08:11 PM
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Oh, my Lord! I am so glad you put this up! I made raisin bran muffins for the first time. My little dog Angel never ate much, and I'm not even sure she ever got a raisin, but she did get a few bites of muffin. She hasn't shown any changes in behavior, but this could have been very bad. Thanks so much for this list. I am goin to put it on the fridge.
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#10 Old 03-08-2007, 09:24 PM
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my heart goes out to the owners who lost a loved one, and especially the animal. It sounds like an awful way to die, so hopefully in the end he/she went peacefully.
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#11 Old 03-09-2007, 07:25 AM
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Life2K "I made raisin bran muffins for the first time. My little dog Angel never ate much, and I'm not even sure she ever got a raisin, but she did get a few bites of muffin."



5 or 10 raisins is probably a lot less harmful than "1/2 a cannister" of raisins.
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#12 Old 03-09-2007, 09:27 AM
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I once had a $400 vet bill when my dogs scavenged the garbage and ate an entire bag of grapes. Two of them fell for the old peroxide mixed in soymilk trick and puked them up on their own, but the husky won't drink peroxide under any circumstances. So I had to take him to the emergency clinic to induce vomiting and for activated charcoal. Several hundred dollars and two hours later, it turns out he probably didn't eat enough to have caused any harm. Most of them were eaten by the other dogs, and then puked up in my back yard.



I haven't bought grapes since.
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#13 Old 03-09-2007, 07:57 PM
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the grape thing is debatable. technically grapes or raisins can kill a dog but they would have to eat such a huge amount for them to be poisonous that most dogs vomit them up before any adverse effects can take place.
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#14 Old 03-10-2007, 08:19 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by soilman View Post

"He was on 3 different anti-vomiting medications and they still couldn't control his vomiting."



Why would they give anti-vomiting medicines to an animal that ate something that was poisoning them (other than something that could seriously burn their esophagus)? Usually the give people syrup of ipecac - to MAKE them vomit.



Because by that time the stomach was empty and no longer any benefit to vomitting. There is also the risk of aspiration pneumonia, choking, water and electrolyte loss.



If you need to make an animal vomit quickly and can't get to a vet. Give alternating doses of peroxide and water until they vomit. Vomitting should not be induced when the animal is not concious (able to gag to protect the airway), seizuring (as if you could get your hands in the mouth, but still don't try) the object swallowed is sharp and could damage the esophagus (esophagus like to heal in a constricted manner and seriously preventing the animal for ever eating properly), the liquid is corrosive (again damaged esophagus) or oily (mineral oil, motor oil, etc. these are better to let go through and not risk aspiration pneumonia). If you aren't certain, call a vet first.



There are reports of animal dying after eating only a few grapes/raisins. It is unknown what the toxic agent is or the dose at which it's toxic. It's just not worth the risk.
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#15 Old 03-10-2007, 08:59 PM
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Oy.



I had no idea about the rasins thing. A few fell on the floor the other day while I was cooking and my dog was in the kitchen at the time and he went over, sniffed one, then walked away. Good thing he didn't eat any. :[ No more rasins in my house. Ever. I don't care for the much, anyways. He has a habit of getting into anything, so I just can't take the chance.



Does anyone know if fortified rice milk is safe for cats? If we run out of cat food and we can't get to the store (this is very ocasionally, considering that we live down the street from our town's grocery store), I'll give the cat a small bit of rice dream. She loves it, but I'm still a bit wary. We do have cows' milk in the house, but I once read that you're not supposed to give that to cats because they can't digest it easily.



I have kinda a funny story about yeast dough, though.



My grandmother used to have a large black lab who thought he was bulletproof. One day, my great-aunt was baking bread and she walked out of the room for a moment, leaving the dough on the counter, as the dog walked into the room and proceeded to eat all of the it. My great-aunt goes back into the room and spends about fifteen minutes looking for the dough. She and my grandmother end up figuring out that the dog ate it and didn't think about it twice about it (this is the dog who ate a wedding dress, so you can see where they got this idea). A little while later, they noticed that the dog's stomach was swelling. The dough was rising in his stomach. ^.^ He ended up having to go to the vet and ended up just fine.
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#16 Old 03-11-2007, 10:40 AM
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cheekywhiskers "Because by that time the stomach was empty "



I don't recall kls mentioning that. Just the dog "started vomiting again."



michey "The dough was rising in his stomach"



That is hilarious. Dogs are so silly. I figure that possibly the dog slurped down the dough in one piece, without chewing it much. That would be an attractive option for a dog, especially if great aunt had put a light coating of oil on the dough's surface, and if the dog was concerned that it only had so much time to steal the food, before great aunt returned to the kitchen. Was the dog able to keep a poker face after doing this? Sometimes they present an unmistakably guilty look.
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#17 Old 03-11-2007, 07:14 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by soilman View Post

cheekywhiskers "Because by that time the stomach was empty "



I don't recall kls mentioning that. Just the dog "started vomiting again."





If you read the times more carefully, he started vomitting again more than 24hrs after eating the raisins. At that point he was vomitting in response to the toxins building in him that the kidneys were no longer filtering out.



If your dog has eaten raisins safely in the past, a few are unlikely to hurt him. Not all dogs will have problems from them, my springer frequently got a few raisins if I has some and she never had any problems (this was before I knew about the posibility of them being toxic).
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#18 Old 03-12-2007, 02:17 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by soilman View Post


michey "The dough was rising in his stomach"



That is hilarious. Dogs are so silly. I figure that possibly the dog slurped down the dough in one piece, without chewing it much. That would be an attractive option for a dog, especially if great aunt had put a light coating of oil on the dough's surface, and if the dog was concerned that it only had so much time to steal the food, before great aunt returned to the kitchen. Was the dog able to keep a poker face after doing this? Sometimes they present an unmistakably guilty look.



Hahahahaha... one look at the dog and it was so obvious that he had done something wrong, they just didn't figure it out right away.
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#19 Old 03-13-2007, 11:58 AM
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I routinely feed small amounts of avocado fruit to my dogs (there is a dog food out there, after all, called Avoderm that has avocado in it), so I was alarmed when I read the list and did some additional research.



It turns out that the avocado plant (the leaves, stalks and even the fruit pit and skin) is toxic to many animals. There may also be additional problems associated with the fruit from Guatemalan avocados, mostly due to allergic reactions, but this has never been confirmed. All reported cases of poisoning from avocado consumption involved the dog eating significant portions of avocado leaves, skins, pits, etc. There have been no confirmed cases of poisonings from animals eating only the fruit.



Just an FYI.
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