Do you brush your dog's teeth? - VeggieBoards
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#1 Old 09-03-2009, 11:58 AM
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My golden retreiver has the worst breath in the world! I just brushed his teeth, it was like brushing the teeth of a manatee w/ those giant floppy lips. He kissy fresh now....lol
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#2 Old 09-03-2009, 12:48 PM
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My golden retreiver has the worst breath in the world! I just brushed his teeth, it was like brushing the teeth of a manatee w/ those giant floppy lips. He kissy fresh now....lol



Ususally people get their teeth done at a vets office which is like a clean/pulling teeth if needed and a good brush but it could be spendy so I guess brushing them yourself works too. You didn't use toothpaste did you? Is that toxic to dogs (I heard it was)

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#3 Old 09-03-2009, 12:53 PM
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We do the cats and the dog regularily. They have pet toothpaste, I can't remember what flavour it is, but they all love it
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#4 Old 09-03-2009, 12:54 PM
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Ususally people get their teeth done at a vets office which is like a clean/pulling teeth if needed and a good brush but it could be spendy so I guess brushing them yourself works too. You didn't use toothpaste did you? Is that toxic to dogs (I heard it was)



They make special pet brushes and paste. I think it's meat flavored.
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#5 Old 09-03-2009, 01:20 PM
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yup, he has his own tooth brush and pet tooth paste...poultry flavor. He seems to like it.
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#6 Old 09-03-2009, 01:27 PM
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They make special pet brushes and paste. I think it's meat flavored.



Eww that sounds revolting!



I might be getting a dog soon hopefully so I like to read how people look after their dogs. I think I will be a wuss and get a professional dog groomer to give my dog a once over every so often.
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#7 Old 09-03-2009, 01:29 PM
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Eww that sounds revolting!



I might be getting a dog soon hopefully so I like to read how people look after their dogs. I think I will be a wuss and get a professional dog groomer to give my dog a once over every so often.



We get ours groomed (although I did bath him myself this week because he's been giving me allergies so I can't breath....), but the groomer doesn't brush his teeth. Our groomer has a van and comes right to the house. It's $60 to have him done. We have him shaved in the spring and mid summer and just a bath and fluff in late fall.
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#8 Old 09-03-2009, 01:49 PM
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We get ours groomed (although I did bath him myself this week because he's been giving me allergies so I can't breath....), but the groomer doesn't brush his teeth. Our groomer has a van and comes right to the house. It's $60 to have him done. We have him shaved in the spring and mid summer and just a bath and fluff in late fall.



Yes. I know someone who is a dog groomer in the US and so I looked up about it in the UK. I think I will get them to do the dog's teeth too. I don't mind bathing a dog though. My friend washes her cat, crazy lady! Mine would throw a fit if I tried that!
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#9 Old 09-03-2009, 02:17 PM
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My friend washes her cat, crazy lady! Mine would throw a fit if I tried that!



I tried to wash a stray cat that I brought in, he spelled like poo. I didn't know they didn't like to be bathed. He sprung out of the water and attached himself firmly to my shoulders. OUCH! He then proceeded to have explosive diareha all over my kitchen floor. It was freezing outside so I couldn't send him back out, especially wet, so we just gave each other the evil eye for the rest of the night...lol
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#10 Old 09-03-2009, 02:22 PM
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I tried to wash a stray cat that I brought in, he spelled like poo. I didn't know they didn't like to be bathed. He sprung out of the water and attached himself firmly to my shoulders. OUCH! He then proceeded to have explosive diareha all over my kitchen floor. It was freezing outside so I couldn't send him back out, especially wet, so we just gave each other the evil eye for the rest of the night...lol



Poor you and him! Yes I imagine if I put any one of my dear cats in the bath I would expect a vicious climb over my shoulder to get away.
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#11 Old 09-06-2009, 12:29 AM
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I give my cats (same with dogs) meaty uncooked bones. They love them, they're healthy, and I'm not covered in scratches from trying to brush their teeth. I believe they sell stuff you pour in water and it cleans the teeth.
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#12 Old 09-06-2009, 04:18 AM
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I brush my dog's front teeth and then I let her chew on the toothbrush to take care of the back teeth. She thinks the toothpaste is a treat.
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#13 Old 09-06-2009, 05:15 AM
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<<< My mutt has his teeth brushed and likes it I use doggie tooth paste and tooth brush, but he has chews as well to clean them.
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#14 Old 09-06-2009, 05:46 AM
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I attempt to brush their teeth but they will clamp their jaws shut so I have a hard time getting inside their mouths.... Stubborn furkids...



I had it done at the vets but they knock them out and would prefer not to have to do that. I had someone give me the name and number of a woman who is certified to clean pet teeth and she does it while they are awake so need to give her a call.
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#15 Old 09-06-2009, 06:06 AM
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Originally Posted by Jessss2008 View Post

Ususally people get their teeth done at a vets office which is like a clean/pulling teeth if needed and a good brush but it could be spendy so I guess brushing them yourself works too. You didn't use toothpaste did you? Is that toxic to dogs (I heard it was)



Uh...I get my teeth done at the dentist's office!



My daughter recently adopted two kittens and she is getting them used to having their teeth brushed. My cats are old now...wish I had known about brushing their teeth earlier.
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#16 Old 09-06-2009, 06:11 AM
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Yep. I brush my dogs' teeth about once a month, with a normal toothbrush and a tiny bit of normal toothpaste. One of my dogs has a few rotting teeth, so I started brushing them and they've improved
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#17 Old 09-06-2009, 06:32 AM
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Yep. I brush my dogs' teeth about once a month, with a normal toothbrush and a tiny bit of normal toothpaste. One of my dogs has a few rotting teeth, so I started brushing them and they've improved



If you don't have dog toothpaste, you could buy the kind the little kids use because it's okay to swallow it.
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#18 Old 09-06-2009, 07:27 AM
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Yep. I brush my dogs' teeth about once a month, with a normal toothbrush and a tiny bit of normal toothpaste. One of my dogs has a few rotting teeth, so I started brushing them and they've improved



you shouldn't be using normal toothpaste, its dangerous to swallow.

Also, if the teeth are already rotting, you should take him to the vet to get them checked out.
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#19 Old 09-06-2009, 07:34 AM
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If your not brusing your pets teeth and cleaning it's ears then your taking poor care of it .
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#20 Old 09-06-2009, 08:17 AM
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I brush my two's every other day. They love the toothpaste. It's chicken flavored. lol

^Cool story, bro
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#21 Old 09-06-2009, 08:51 AM
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Originally Posted by Jessss2008 View Post

Ususally people get their teeth done at a vets office which is like a clean/pulling teeth if needed and a good brush but it could be spendy so I guess brushing them yourself works too. You didn't use toothpaste did you? Is that toxic to dogs (I heard it was)



My Vet has always insisted that everyone needs to brush their dog's teeth. The cleaning in the office is basically if you haven't done this or if you have a dog that has more severe dental problems. Its about $350 per dog to have their teeth cleaned at the Vet's office (at least where I live) and any teeth that need to be pulled is of course an extra fee. Plus your dog is put under anesthesia and why do that if you can avoid it?



By brushing their teeth at home, you avoid the extra cost and the extra risk associated with having it done at the Vet and you spend a little time handling your pet which they do love. My oldest Dachshund has very bad teeth even with brushing and has to have them pulled all the time. Its very expensive for me and so painful for him. He now has very few teeth left which causes him problems eating.



My other 3 Doxies are doing fine with the brushing every day, although the 10 year old did need one professioanl cleaning, but thankfully no dental surgery.



Pet toothpaste also has prophylactic qualities, so that even if your pet objects to you brushing their teeth, if you can just wipe some of the paste on their teeth and gums they get most of the same benefits that they would receive from a good brushing. You can just use your finger to do this and most dogs really don't object to it.



Its especially important to do this if your dog eats soft food or canned dog food. This can get under the gum line and can literally destroy the teeth....plus they get very bad breath from it.



My cat hates it, but he tolerates it.



My neighbor's dog had really bad breath & terrible looking teeth. He got a large build up of plaque on his teeth which led to an infection under the gum line in one of his front canine teeth (fangs) . The infection went through the sinus cavity and up into the brain. After much suffering he had to be put down. He was only 6 years old.



It could have been avoided by some preventative dental care and just some daily brushing. My neighbor has rescued another dog and is brushing his teeth every single day.



Its just part of having an animal companion. Like grooming and nail clipping and shots and picking up poop and .....but we all love them so its not even an issue.


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#22 Old 09-07-2009, 11:18 AM
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Ideally brushing should be done every day. There's no real substitute for it as commercially available chews are simply not as effective. Of course, in the real world I can't brush one of my cats without major blood shed on my part and an asthma attack on his. So, we make do with chews. For my dogs I've switched to raw meaty bones and am having great success.



I can't remember who posted about going to someone for a dental cleaning without anesthetic, but please save your money and your pet the stress. There is no effective way to give a dental without anesthetic. Without anesthesia your pet will not receive cleaning above the gum line and the insides of the teeth will be almost impossible to properly clean. There will be no way to measure pocket depth and no way to take dental x-rays. Since this person is not a vet your pet will no be receiving antibiotics and bacteria could potentially enter his blood stream leading to complications. Also, I know that even my most relaxed dog would eventually panic if someone tried to scale and polish his teeth. Anesthesia is very safe if done by a competent vet on a pet that has had a proper exam and pre-anesthetic blood work.
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#23 Old 09-12-2009, 09:57 AM
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Lots of good advice here about dental care. There are many good products out there: treats, chews, wipes, brushes, pastes, rinses, etc. There's really no excuse for not taking care of your pet's teeth in some form or another (no need for confrontation or blood shed either). It is recommended to do dental care daily, but who has time for that? Little things can help decrease the amount of time you need to actively tend to your dog's teeth. Mine get Greenies daily and they chew on nylabones, plus brushing/wiping every so often.



Good genetics also play a part, some of the smaller breeds seem to have naturally bad teeth, may have something to do with pH and enzymes in the saliva. Over time, pitting on the enamal surface can hasten tartar bild up. Human tooth paste is too abrasive for dog and cat teeth and actually make the problem worse by making wearing away the enamel and causing irregularities in the surface.



Another thing to be very cautious of: raw meaty bones. Dogs have not been wolves for thousands of years, and the products and breeding of even the last hundred years means that many dogs are no longer adapted to tolerate the potential pathogen load of raw meat, the higher fat content (both can lead to diarrhea, pancreatitis, gastritis, etc.) and the hard bones can cause the teeth to break or wear down very quickly. I've seen many dog with these problems, ask any veterinary dentist and they will tell you the same thing. There are better ways to take care of your pet's teeth.
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#24 Old 09-12-2009, 06:13 PM
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Another thing to be very cautious of: raw meaty bones. Dogs have not been wolves for thousands of years, and the products and breeding of even the last hundred years means that many dogs are no longer adapted to tolerate the potential pathogen load of raw meat, the higher fat content (both can lead to diarrhea, pancreatitis, gastritis, etc.) and the hard bones can cause the teeth to break or wear down very quickly. I've seen many dog with these problems, ask any veterinary dentist and they will tell you the same thing. There are better ways to take care of your pet's teeth.

Their digestive system has not changed in the 100 years since commercial pet food existed. Nature doesn't work that way.
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#25 Old 09-12-2009, 06:18 PM
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Their digestive system has not changed in the 100 years since commercial pet food existed. Nature doesn't work that way.



Are you a vet, too?
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#26 Old 09-12-2009, 07:00 PM
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Mine get Greenies daily and they chew on nylabones, plus brushing/wiping every so often.



I've read a lot of articles that led me to believe Greenies weren't good for dogs because they lack certain enzymes to break down the bits and causes them to get lodged in their intestines. Have there been any changes made to the product or have I just been misinformed?

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#27 Old 09-12-2009, 07:16 PM
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Actually, I'm the vet.



Dog generations are short, a female is usually only about 1.5-2 years old before she is bred for the first time (sometimes less than a year if the owner's are irresponsible or she's feral). 100 years is equivalent to at least 25 dog generations (four years from the birth of a dog to the birth of offspring), if all offspring breed at the first heat it's closer to 100 generations! That's alot of generations for evolution to work on. Since 1900's we've created and standardized many breeds (American Eskimo in the 1040's and Miki in 1982 are two that I can think of off the top of my head). Take a look back in dog breed books from the early 20th century and compare the differences to the same breeds of today. You can not say that 100 years isn't sufficient time for dogs to change.



We have influenced their survival by getting rid of pathogens in their food, so their immune system doesn't need to be so strong (usually due to down regulation of genes _ keeping it simple for the not so science minded here), but we can't always tell since they thrive just fine on comercial dog food. These dogs with weaker immune systems are then allowed to breed an produce more pups with weaker immune systems. What happens when these dogs are reintorduced to pathogens? They don't fight them off as well and get pancreatitis, enteritis, etc. This can be seen in many breeds that now are more prone to infections, generalized demodex (bully breeds are bad for this in particular) and cancers that were not so prone to these problems in the past.



There are ways to significantly reduce the pathogen load of the raw food you feed your pet, but the big bones are still too hard on the teeth. For everyone here who gives them without problems, I've seen 10+ clients with pets with fractured or broken teeth from eating raw bones.
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#28 Old 09-12-2009, 07:28 PM
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Since that report (the problem was dog's getting the incorrect size and gulping them), Greenies have been reformulated. The top ingredient is gelatin and the next ones are wheat protein isolate, soy flour, etc, stuff that is often in regular dog food or fully digestable. The dogs that died from the product either choked on the bone in the air way or gulped large pieces (really defeats the purpose anyway), so apparently they weren't supervised while chewing on them. The number of dogs that have had problems with Greenies is very small compared to the amount of product produced and sold (even smaller when you add the other brands with similar products: nylabone dentabone, Iams brand, etc). More dogs have problems with soft toys, rope toys, socks, underwear, I even saw a pup that choked on kibble (would you stop giving that because a dog died from inhaling it?). My conclusion was that Greenies are very safe and have proven to be effective in maintaining the health of my dogs' teeth.
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#29 Old 09-12-2009, 07:45 PM
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Actually, I'm the vet.

Oh, I know. I was trying to say you were a vet so you probably know what you're talking about. Sorry if I didn't come across clearly.
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#30 Old 09-12-2009, 10:30 PM
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I give my dogs bones.... However the vets that I've been to and other people always ask me if I brush their teeth because they say they look so perfect. (:



My other dog, who lived to be 13, only got a couple of teeth brushings (she wasn't a fan so I stopped) and she never had any teeth problems.

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