DawnWatch: Discover Magazine on lab-grown meat -- July 2006 edition - VeggieBoards
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#1 Old 07-10-2006, 02:34 PM
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The July edition of Discover Magazine has an article under "Blinded by Science" headed, "The Way of All Flesh. Bringing home the bacon may become a thing of the past when we can grow our own." (p 28.)



It opens with a discussion of a proposed meat machine, and suggests that "in the future we'll be sprinkling a few 'starter cells' into our meat machine before we go to bed and adding a cup or two of 'growth medium.' The next morning we'll awake to an appetizing, fully formed lump of pork or beef or poultry, ready to be fried up with breakfast..."



It tells us that this new meat will be healthier for humans:

"The steaks and chops we use to fill our faces will have the fat content of mere salmon. Nor shall we submit any longer to disease. Salmonella, mad cow, E. coli . . . these will be consigned to the dustbin of meat history and the name pool of heavy-metal bands."



The article suggests that some vegetarians will be thrilled:

"Ingrid Newkirk, founder and president of People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals, informs me that she has been following Dr. Mironov's career and the glacial progress of the 'lab-grown meat' movement since its inception. Newkirk is salivating in anticipation of the day she finally gets to eat a chunk of meat that nothing had to suffer to produce-not least because the flesh won't contain the vast quantity of 'rectums and nose-skin bacteria' she assures me I've been eating a lot of."



It continues:



"But Newkirk is the right sort of vegetarian: the rational sort. She concedes that not all of her pale fellow travelers share a commonsensical enthusiasm for the coming revolution."



It then goes on to discuss, in amusing detail, the kinds of vegetarians the author imagines won't be pleased, those whose "decision not to eat meat was inspired less by the contemplated suffering of animals than by the contemplated prolonged suffering of parents forced to cook two sets of meals...."



You can read the whole article on line at:

http://www.discover.com/issues/jul-0...ments/blinded/



It presents a fabulous opportunity for letters about the current methods of bringing meat to dining tables.

Discover takes letters at [email protected]



Always include your full name, address, and daytime phone number when sending a letter to the editor. Shorter letters are more likely to be published.



Yours and the animals',

Karen Dawn



(DawnWatch is an animal advocacy media watch that looks at animal issues in the media and facilitates one-click responses to the relevant media outlets. You can learn more about it, and sign up for alerts at http://www.DawnWatch.com. To unsubscribe, go to http://www.dawnwatch.com/cgi-bin/dad...nsubscribe.cgi You are encouraged to forward or reprint DawnWatch alerts but please do so unedited -- leave DawnWatch in the title and include this tag line.)
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#2 Old 07-11-2006, 03:47 AM
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It is awesome to see this field expand so much. I can't wait for the day that lab-grown meat becomes cheaper than raising farm animals. !!
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#3 Old 07-16-2006, 08:45 PM
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Well that's better than the article I read about scientists trying to raise animals (turkeys in particular) with extra legs and wings, so people can profit more for raising less animals.



I still wouldn't eat the "starter cell" meat.
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#4 Old 07-16-2006, 09:23 PM
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There is a similar article in the Vegetarian Times july/aug issue.



I obviously prefer it to farming, for those who eat animals...i suppose it would help alot of the issues of cruelty/polution etc... but i still couldn't do it. Just thinking about it turns my stomach. yech.
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#5 Old 07-16-2006, 10:18 PM
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Well...it has its upside: animals wouldn't suffer from factory farming.



But I wouldn't eat that. Everytime I look at meat I am sickened and just because it comes out of a machine doesn't make it anymore tasteful. But what are the odds of them being successful with this creation?
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#6 Old 07-17-2006, 11:59 AM
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But wouldn't the starter cells have to come from animals?
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#7 Old 07-17-2006, 12:40 PM
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Not necessarily, minibean. In fact, I'd think that'd be a pretty inefficient way to do it. They'd probably end up being specially engineered bacteria. It'd be cheaper and easier to produce that way than using large animals.



Even if they did need to start with real animals, they wouldn't need to use anywhere near as many as are currently used. Getting cells to manufacture might be as simple as getting saliva swabs. Who knows?
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#8 Old 07-17-2006, 12:45 PM
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If we can take a few saliva swabs, or heck even needle biopsies, from a few starter animals and then culture the meat in vats and millions can have their burgers and chicken nuggets and pepperoni without killing any animals, I'm all for it. Even if they killed some animals at the beginning of the process, wouldn't that be a huge improvement over what goes on now?
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#9 Old 07-17-2006, 10:18 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Minibean View Post

But wouldn't the starter cells have to come from animals?



According to the Vegetarian Times article it says: "...the technique involves a relatively painless process of removing muscle cells from a live animal through a thin needle then letting the cells grow and divide in asort of giant petri dish- a vat kept at the tsame temp. as the animal's body and filled w/ glucose, amino acids and minerals." then it is poured "onto large plastic sheets that are continually stretched to 'exercise' the cells and keepthem growing. after a few weeks, a millimeter-thick sheet of meat can be peeled off, rolled up and minced into hamburger." yum.



the issue, according to the Dutch, who are in the forefront of this, is the cost of production. they say if it is well funded, "this could become a reality in the next decade."



a necessary evil perhaps?



oh, btw,

hi tesseract!

im tess too!
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#10 Old 07-17-2006, 11:49 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LucidAnne View Post

oh, btw,

hi tesseract!

im tess too!



But I should add, Tess isn't my real name... it's just a short form of Tesseract. My RL name is a closely guarded state secret.
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#11 Old 07-18-2006, 01:44 AM
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Ah, i see... veerrry mysterious!!

good pick though! ha
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