anybody make their own yogurt? - VeggieBoards
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#1 Old 03-25-2009, 04:24 PM
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My sister has this machine, and really likes it alot. http://www.amazon.com/EuroCuisine-YM.../dp/B000Q4Y8OY



It's the EuroCuisine, and she has found that it's cheaper, and tastes really good too.



Told the hubbs about it, and he showed some interest. We could get the acidopholus (sp?) at the co-op.

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#2 Old 03-26-2009, 08:37 AM
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I haven't tried it but I've been thinking about it. Especially after I found that the yogurt makers aren't very expensive. I can't find plain soy yogurt around here and I have several recipes that call for it so that is my main motivation. I've done some searching on the internet but I can't really find any info from anyone who has made soy yogurt before. I hate to buy another machine that just collects dust!
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#3 Old 03-26-2009, 01:33 PM
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I made my own yogurt for about a year, it was great - need to start again. I got the starter from the health food store. When I ate it, I would put about a teaspoon of frozen orange juice concentrate in it - it was awesome.
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#4 Old 03-26-2009, 08:10 PM
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I don't know anything about making soy yogurt, and don't think my sister would try.

The orange juice sounds like a creamsicle! Bet it is good.



Nobody else makes yogurt on here? I'd like to hear some other opinions out there, to decide whether this is money we should invest in.

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#5 Old 03-27-2009, 12:38 PM
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I make my own Yogurt.

I use a Tbls.or two of store-bought to get the Culture going.

I haven't tried using a Soy starter, so don't know if my recipe would work...don't see why not though. Next time I go to the health food store I will give it a try...if nothing else I can feed the failure to the chickens...Oops that won't work cuz they won't even taste anything soy based...too smart to eat processed food stuffs...~lol~...(They will eat Soy beans and love my excess Sourdough starter...funny creatures)
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#6 Old 03-27-2009, 01:51 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Photojess View Post

Nobody else makes yogurt on here?



Im ArmenianIve been doing it all my life, as did my father before me, and his father before him, and his father before that, and, well, you get the idea. Im not sure where to begin, so Ill start by just tossing out a few interesting factoids that you odars (non-Armenians) are generally completely oblivious to. First of all, the invention of the piezo-electric igniter was the downfall of Armenian civilization as we know it. Back in the day, when all ovens were ignited by gas pilot lights instead of wannabee spark plugs, every home in the known universe had a built-in yogurt maker, whether its occupants were aware of it or not. Thats rightthe inside of the oven was the perfect temperature for culturing yogurt. Armenian families would generally make a gallon at a time using one of those big square Corningware casserole things (the ones that have the blue flower print on the side that they dont make anymore, and which sell for a small fortune now on eBay). We just heated the milk, added our culture, put the lid on, stuck it in the empty oven, and went to bed. In the morning we had yogurt. So if your home still has an oven with a gas pilot light, youre in business.



On to other matters of importance. Contrary to what every dingleberry and his dog will try to tell you, you do not have to boil the milk first. I repeat: it is not necessary to boil the milk first. That is a throwback to the days before milk was pasteurized. As a matter of fact, you dont even have to heat it at all if you dont want to. You can take cold milk straight out of the refrigerator, put it in the yogurt maker, add your starter, and turn it on. As soon as the milk warms to the point where bacteria can reproduce, the curdling process will begin.



What to use for starter: yogurt. Thats right; forget about all those silly-ass starter kits from the health food store. Just go to the grocery store and get a half-pint of plain yogurt and you have your starter culture. You have to watch out for brands which are heat-pasteurized after the yogurt is packaged, though. This kills the bacteria and makes it useless. When this became a widespread practice after WWII, Armenians used to grumble that it was being done for the sole purpose of preventing them from making their own yogurt. That particular form of insanity has died out though, as most of the manufacturers are trying to cater to the gut-flora-are-your-warm-and-fuzzy-friends crowd who want live acidophilus culture. However, there are still a few brands which are pasteurized after the milk is curdled, so read the labels. Also, there are vast differences between brands which do have live cultures in terms of how strong the culture is. For example, Mountain High advertises on the side of the carton that it contains live culture, but in our collective experience it makes very ho-hum starter. The same is true of other brands. The best way to do it is to go to an ethnic store and get the yogurt which has Armenian writing all over the carton. Im not trying to be funnyArmenian-made yogurt really has the strongest concentration of live culture. And rememberit has to be plain yogurtflavored yogurts just dont work for some reason.



OK, this is getting a little long and I have too much to do. Ill post some more tonight or maybe tomorrow morning. Oh, and on the garbanzo bean question, I weighed some out last night and it seems that a cup of dried banzos is about 180 grams. So one and two-thirds of a cup should yield about 300 grams.
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#7 Old 03-27-2009, 02:02 PM
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My maker came with instructions to boil so that's what I've been doing. Not having to would make the process much easier! I'm going to try that.



I got enough powdered culture with mine that I haven't had to try anything else yet.

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#8 Old 03-27-2009, 02:59 PM
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Washoe, et all, thanks for all of that good info. I don't think many stoves, unless they are very old, have pilot lights anymore. When you do post again, can you list your favorite yogurts to use? I'll let the sis know, she could save some money!



Thanks!

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#9 Old 03-27-2009, 09:15 PM
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My fave has always been the Byblos brand, but any old yogurt with the Armenian squigglydoodles on the carton will work just as well. Just look for the Hyestani label and you cant go wrong.



So you dont want to go out and buy a yogurt maker, eh? Well, my great grandmother and generations of Armenian women before her did just fine without them, in addition to doing without thermometers or even gas stoves. Just heat the milk to the appropriate temperature, add the starter, and keep it warm enough until the little yogurt critters are done doing their thang. How do you know when its the right temperature? My grandmother would heat the milk until two drops dripped on the back of her wrist felt warm. Good enough for government work, if you ask me. How do we keep the culture warm for the necessary period of time? Well, my grandmother had a gas pilot oven, but her mother didnt. SOP back in the day was to put the warm culture in a heavy container, wrap a thick blanket around it to insulate it, and put it in a draft-free location (like the inside of a cupboard) for a few hours until it curdled. Cant get much simpler than that.



So, what are we going to do with our plain, unflavored yogurt? Well, we can do what Armenians have been doing for centuries and add fruit. Or we can (GASP!) learn to like it plain. But if youre hanging with the homies in Yerevan, youre gonna have to learn to eat jajik and drink tahn (scroll to the bottom for tahn). Mmm, mmm, good.



A word about starters: most people stir the starter into the warm milk and mix it until it is completely dissolved into the milk. Ive had mixed results using this method. I prefer to just drop the starter into the milk and simply let it sink to the bottom in one large glop. This seems to give more consistent results. Someday I think I'll try doing bothdissolving half the starter and letting the other half just sink to the bottom.



Another word concerning tartness. As far as I know, the length of time the yogurt is kept at incubation temperature controls the level of sourness. However, I cant remember if the sourness increases with time, or decreases. Im pretty sure it increases, but Im not 100% positive. Normal time is 8 12 hours; after 12 hours I think it can spoil. Try playing with it and seeing what you come up with.



One wonderful thing about making your own yogurt in a large quantity is that you can make it thicker with time. Every morning, open your container and you will see water (this is actually whey) floating on top. Pour this out every day, and your yogurt will get thicker and thicker until it is like stiff custard. I use it like sour cream in rice & bean burritos. One of these days Im going to try to make an Indian burrito with white basmati, chana dal, various authentic spices, and a thick yogurt dressing. Bet its gonna be killerIll let you know after the fact.



Thats about all I can think of to say for now. If you have any questions, feel free to shoot. If I think of anything more to add, Ill post it when it comes to me.
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#10 Old 03-28-2009, 04:52 AM
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well that was a totally cool read- thank you! I like your reason for editing too, it's funny

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#11 Old 05-17-2009, 06:27 PM
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This source suggests that the proper temperature for curdling milk can be achieved in an oven without a gas pilot light by turning on the ovens light and leaving it on overnight. Seems perfectly plausible to me, but Ive never tried this before so caveat emptor, YMMV, dont hold me responsible if it doesnt work, blah blah blah.
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#12 Old 05-19-2009, 08:43 PM
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I still haven't bought one, but my sister is a dedicated yogurt maker, and it doesn't have any of the artificial stuff in it. She really likes it a lot.

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