Seitan help - VeggieBoards
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#1 Old 04-06-2008, 06:34 PM
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I've been craving chicken noodle soup lately and want to make it from scratch with seitan. How would I go about making the seitan for it? My grocery store has prepared seitan(no flavorings) in vacumn packs in the fridge section. Could I use that and add spices to it or would I need to make it from scratch to work well? Thanks in advance!



ETA Would it be possible to make beef style chunks from commercially prepared seitan?
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#2 Old 04-06-2008, 07:00 PM
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I think it would work ok. I've never seen seitan that hasn't been marinated in something. I would prefer it if I could buy it plain. I often make it and add chunks to my veggie soup!
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#3 Old 04-06-2008, 07:02 PM
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So if I get the plain, I could marinate it in mock chicken stock and spices then add to the soup?
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#4 Old 04-06-2008, 07:09 PM
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That should work...although I would probably just add it to the soup as is...it will probably pick up the flavoring from the soup anyway...I tend to make my seitan very bland (not a fan of spices). So when I add it to my soups it's in its plain state. Sometimes I add it to the soup as the soup is cooking. Othertimes I just add it in last minute, like if I'm just reheating it to have for lunch.
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#5 Old 04-06-2008, 07:15 PM
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It should work fine. Morningstar Farms Chik'n Strips also work well in soup, though you have to add them at the last minute because they suck up the broth (or just leave it on the side and add it to the bowls as you eat them if you're going to have leftovers).

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#6 Old 04-06-2008, 07:26 PM
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Great! I hadn't thought of this before but would it be possible to make beef style chunks from the plain commercial packages?
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#7 Old 04-06-2008, 08:01 PM
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I don't think commercially made seitan would soak up enough flavour to taste much like "beef". Usually once it's made, it's not going to soak up any more flavour, unlike other products (like tofu).



Morningstar also makes beef strips which are pretty good. (Boy are we advertising for THEM today, huh!). TVP chunks are a good beef-sub option too. They come hard and dry and can be soaked or simmered in "beef" style broth until they soak it up.



What were you wanting to make with the chicken or beef? (besides the soup). That might help us know what products to recommend.
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#8 Old 04-06-2008, 08:05 PM
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White Wave has a chicken style seitan, which is pretty chunky....
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#9 Old 04-06-2008, 08:07 PM
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As I said the chicken style would be for noodle soup and this mashed potato/chicken/gravy dish my mom used to make. I'd like to add beef style to stew, i'm sure there's more uses but that's one biggest one. I love morningstar steak strips and those are great for fajitas but they don't do well with liquid. I'd like to try the chunks but I'd have to go to seattle or mail order them, neither of which is particularly appealing. Is it hard to make beef style seitan from scratch? Where do I find the stuff for it? I've seen recipes but they all look so complicated.
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#10 Old 04-06-2008, 08:14 PM
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You're in Tacoma, right? Marlene's, in Tacoma has beef TVP (or unflavored).

Fred Meyer sometimes has it in their bulk section.



Making seitan isn't really difficult. The best info/pictures/how-to is on Rabid_Child's blog: http://megatarian.blogspot.com . I also tend to like a lot of Bryanna Clark Grogan's recipes, they always turn out great - but hers have a LOT of ingredients!



You should be able to find the ingredients to make seitan at Fred Meyer or Marlenes or possibly Trader Joe's in Lakewood. Let me know.
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#11 Old 04-06-2008, 09:37 PM
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I called Marlene's a while back, they have tvp but not the chunk kind. Fred Meyers only has the granular kind too. I totally forgot about Trader Joes though, I'll check before attempting to make it myself. Thanks for all the help!
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#12 Old 04-11-2008, 03:31 PM
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Seitan is my favoritist bestest ingrediant.



I've seen a mix that makes a dough that you then boil to make seitan (OK, I've purchased said mix, but I can't remeber details ...) I'm thinking that might be good for incorporating flavors, using weak soy sauce solution instead of water in making the dough.



Cheap (relatively), quick, take it to work-type recipe:



1 can Pataks (or whatever) Korma (or whatever) sauce (try 'em all!)

1 can mock duck (the brand I use is in my local mainstream grocery chain store)

some cooked rice (sorry 'bout the amount ... I eyeball it, so 'some'. Enough to pour the sauce over)



Drain mock duck. Put in microwave-safe container. Pour the sauce over it. Microwave on high for say 2 minutes. Pile a bunch of the rice on a plate. Pour 1/2 the mock duck/seitan mix over it. Microwave another minute or so. Eat. Put leftover rice in container with leftover sauce/mock duck. Throw it in the fridge. Eat next day after reheating.



The essence of guerilla cookery there. Mix together something chewy and sauce, serve over rice. Yum!



For those wondering why I brought this up here, in the Midwest mock duck=seitan. On the coasts mock duck is tofu-based. I have no idea about the rest of the world.



Genesis of the dish: I was trying to approximate the curried mock duck that is really a standard in Vietnamese restaraunts around here. Obviously I strayed from my original concept! But it's good ... try it!

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#13 Old 04-11-2008, 03:38 PM
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Mock duck huh? Sounds... interesting. I could never stomach the thought of eating duck. The recipe sounds good though. I got some vital wheat gluten flour a few days ago but haven't looked up recipes for doing anything with it yet.
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#14 Old 04-14-2008, 01:07 PM
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Never had duck myself (ever!), so I have no idea how 'ducky' mock duck it is.

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#15 Old 04-14-2008, 01:11 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave in MPLS View Post

Never had duck myself (ever!), so I have no idea how 'ducky' mock duck it is.



That's probably the best way to try mock meats. Who cares how realistic it is if you have nothing to judge against. Tastiness is all that matters
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#16 Old 04-26-2008, 01:59 PM
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I just finished my first batch of seitan. It came out pretty well, spongey but good. I boiled half the batch and it's far too spongey and chewy. I boiled it which i've since discovered isn't a good idea so the second half of the batch is going to be very carefully simmered. I pinched off a bit to try in the oven too. Is there a way to get it stringy, like chicken is?
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#17 Old 04-26-2008, 03:41 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gillibean View Post

I just finished my first batch of seitan. It came out pretty well, spongey but good. I boiled half the batch and it's far too spongey and chewy. I boiled it which i've since discovered isn't a good idea so the second half of the batch is going to be very carefully simmered. I pinched off a bit to try in the oven too. Is there a way to get it stringy, like chicken is?



Seitan shouldn't be boiled. You bring the cooking liquid to a boil, then reduce it to a low simmer and put a lid on it (with a little room for steam to escape) the instant it begins boiling it. Actually boiling it will make it spongy.

http://megatarian.blogspot.com
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#18 Old 04-26-2008, 04:24 PM
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Have you considered baking a seitan log?
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#19 Old 04-26-2008, 04:32 PM
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I'm going to attempt a log at some point later. Even really spongey and chewy the taste of the seitan was really good. Overseasoning it worked out well. I was wanting shredded bits for chocken noodle soup and for this gravy/mashed potato dish my mom makes. I'll keep looking for something with a shreddable texture. The way they came out today would be great breaded for chicken fried steak. I'm sooo glad I like seitan, this opens so many doors for variety for me
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#20 Old 04-26-2008, 04:35 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rabid_child View Post

Seitan shouldn't be boiled. You bring the cooking liquid to a boil, then reduce it to a low simmer and put a lid on it (with a little room for steam to escape) the instant it begins boiling it. Actually boiling it will make it spongy.



I used your blog as a guide actually and seemed to have overlooked that apparently very important distinction. oops!
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#21 Old 04-26-2008, 07:05 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gillibean View Post

I used your blog as a guide actually and seemed to have overlooked that apparently very important distinction. oops!



Yea... I tried to make that clear. It has to be cooked low and slow. Ah well, now you know first hand why that is

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#22 Old 04-26-2008, 07:35 PM
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I like simmering it for an hour, then baking it for 45 mins to an hour
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