Chickpeas and hummus - where's the alleged protein? - VeggieBoards
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#1 Old 09-11-2005, 01:56 AM
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There seems to be a general consensus on VB that chickpeas (garbanzo beans) and hummus, which is made from chickpeas, are a good source of protein. I have a 7 ounce (198 grams) container of Cedarlane hummus. The nutritional information states that there are 2 grams of protein per serving, with the serving size being two tablespoons (28 grams). I also have a 15 ounce (425 grams) can of Trader Joe's Organic garbanzo beans; the nutritional information states that there are 6 grams of protein per serving, with the serving size being 1/2 a cup (115 grams).



My question is, doesn't that seem like only a tiny amount of protein? Not much bang for the buck, as it were. How much protein is the average person supposed to get per day? How much hummus and how many chickpeas would one have to eat to get enough of their required amount of protein?

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#2 Old 09-11-2005, 02:28 AM
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I thought there was more protein than that in chick peas. Weird.



When I make my own hummus, I use sunflower seeds (or sesame seeds) and sesame oil, which adds a little more protein. I think most people use seeds, and that's why it's assumed to be higher in protein.



For the last question, it depends on how much you eat. I need about 1200-1400 cal a day, so I need about 46g of protein a day. You'd need to eat a lot of chick peas, according to those stats you gave. Good thing we have other sources.
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#3 Old 09-11-2005, 03:07 AM
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You seem to have answered your own questions. :P



I don't know though, I don't eat chick peas, falafel or hummus.
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#4 Old 09-11-2005, 06:30 AM
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most beans have 6-7 grams of protein per half cup "serving." 1/2 cup is tiny and 2 tablespoons is tinier. 18g in a three-serving can isn't bad. probably about 1/3 the amount of protein you need in a day in only about 300 calories.
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#5 Old 09-11-2005, 03:32 PM
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According to nutritiondata.com, canned chickpeas have 12g of protein and raw chickpeas have 39g protein per 1 cup serving.



Maybe somewhere in the processing (on the can you have), some protein is being lost? *shrugs*
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#6 Old 09-11-2005, 03:47 PM
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About 19% of the calories in chickpeas come from proteins (12 gram per cup). That's pretty much. But it's less than say lentils (41%), lima beans, or peas (43%). (In grams per cup that's, respectively, 18 grams, 12 grams, and 10 grams.)



As for hummus, the brand I buy (I think there's a lot of nutritional variation from brand to brand) has 21% of its calories come from proteins (18 grams per cup), but a whopping 69% from fat.
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#7 Old 09-11-2005, 03:51 PM
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I buy oil-free hummus, but it still doesn't have much protein. Think about it for a second, Amy, honestly. Hummus is basically chickpeas watered down with stuff--of course it doesn't have that much protein per (tiny 2 T) serving.



Protein content of chickpeas varies from brand to brand.
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#8 Old 09-11-2005, 04:02 PM
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Do you think its necessary to buy oil-free hummus? I thought the oil was a good fat, and it doesn't seem hummus has a whole lot of calories. Is it a taste preference thing?
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#9 Old 09-11-2005, 04:31 PM
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Well, for one, a lot of commercial hummus has canola oil in it, which I don't consider a healthy fat.



Extra-virgin olive oil, in limited amounts, is good...but I guess I just like to control the amount of oil I eat, so I'd rather use it in cooking or on salad than buy a product with oil in it from the store. It's easier for me when I can SEE how much oil I'm eating, you know? And the Whole Foods near me makes a delicious oil-free hummus, so it's easy!



ETA: Also, I like to be able to pig out on the hummus
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#10 Old 09-11-2005, 04:33 PM
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The hummus I buy (a Lebanese brand - I think it's called Durra) doesn't have any oil added. The fat comes from tahini.
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#11 Old 09-11-2005, 05:00 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MollyGoat View Post

Well, for one, a lot of commercial hummus has canola oil in it, which I don't consider a healthy fat.



i don't get it, what's unhealthy about canola?
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#12 Old 09-11-2005, 11:12 PM
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i don't get it, what's unhealthy about canola?

Actually canola is a good source of fat, since it has Omega-3 fatty acids in it. Not lots, but some.
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#13 Old 09-11-2005, 11:22 PM
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Actually canola is a good source of fat, since it has Omega-3 fatty acids in it. Not lots, but some.



yah thats what i thought, olive oil is higher in sat fats... so i would think of the two the better choice is canola, nutritionally speaking (olive tastes much better)
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#14 Old 09-12-2005, 12:24 AM
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Originally Posted by 4EverGrounded View Post

According to nutritiondata.com, canned chickpeas have 12g of protein and raw chickpeas have 39g protein per 1 cup serving.



Maybe somewhere in the processing (on the can you have), some protein is being lost? *shrugs*

12g per 1 cup is the same as her can's 6g per 1/2 cup.
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#15 Old 09-12-2005, 05:33 AM
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So how healthy is hummus? It's one of my favourite foods and I eat tonnes of it - is it that good for me?
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#16 Old 09-12-2005, 07:39 AM
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My main problem with canola is that there are few processors of it, one of the only processing plants is owned by Archer Daniels Midland, I believe. I'm torn between my desire to eat healthier food and my desire to avoid supporting Big Ag.



My problem with hummus is that I can never find dry chickpeas! I can't use canned because they have too much sodium. So I make hummus with other kinds of beans.
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#17 Old 09-12-2005, 07:43 AM
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Hummus is a tasty healthy food .... just not souly a good source of protein if you only eat the recommened serving size of 2 tablespoons.



In general, I've stopped looking at foods in terms of protein vs. non-protein foods. Everything you eat adds up and most everything, with the exception of fruit, oils, and refined grains, has some protein in it. Those garbonzo beans may only have 6 grams in one serving, but pair them with a serving of whole wheat noodles (9 grams) and some dark green veggies (3+ grams) and you have close to 20g of protein for one meal. Your diet is the sum of all its parts
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#18 Old 09-12-2005, 08:45 AM
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^^ Yup yup!

Single vegetarian for 19 years seeks tasty vegetables to devour. Reply only if interested in being consumed whole.
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#19 Old 09-12-2005, 08:48 AM
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Originally Posted by Jinga View Post

Hummus is a tasty healthy food .... just not souly a good source of protein if you only eat the recommened serving size of 2 tablespoons.



In general, I've stopped looking at foods in terms of protein vs. non-protein foods. Everything you eat adds up and most everything, with the exception of fruit, oils, and refined grains, has some protein in it. Those garbonzo beans may only have 6 grams in one serving, but pair them with a serving of whole wheat noodles (9 grams) and some dark green veggies (3+ grams) and you have close to 20g of protein for one meal. Your diet is the sum of all its parts



So where does the weird, pink, marshmallowy part of the diet fit in, protein wise?

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#20 Old 09-12-2005, 08:48 AM
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Originally Posted by Jinga View Post

the recommened serving size of 2 tablespoons.

Gosh, I eat much more than that.

Why is there a recommended serving?
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#21 Old 09-12-2005, 09:10 AM
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Just out of curiousity (and laziness), would the protein amount in home made chickpea hummus be more than in a brand purchased at a store?
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#22 Old 09-12-2005, 10:59 AM
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Carrot, the recommended serving is simply the amount they used when calculating the nutritional info. Calorically dense dressings, nut butters, and hummus are considered more of a topping, so they expect you'll eat a smaller amount of it. I love hummus myself and slather it on in large amounts



Amy, the weird, pink, marshmallow is pretty much pure sugar and fluff ... not much nutritionally speaking
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#23 Old 09-12-2005, 02:26 PM
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yah thats what i thought, olive oil is higher in sat fats... so i would think of the two the better choice is canola, nutritionally speaking (olive tastes much better)



1. Omega-3s. Canola has miniscule amounts of omega-3s, it's true. (If you cook with canola oil, forget about it--the omega-3s are destroyed in cooking.) But the omega-3 to omega-6 ratio is what's most important, and canola oil has a very poor omega-3 to omega-6 ratio.

2. Saturated fat. There is no evidence from that saturated fat from plant sources is harmful, if a reasonable amount of overall fat is being consumed. In fact, there's some evidence that it's beneficial.

3. Monounsaturated fat. Monounsaturated fat is fairly stable, a beneficial fat that doesn't compete with omega-3 for absorption. Olive oil has more monounsaturated fat than canola.

4. Polyunsaturated fat. Polyunsaturated fats are less stable, compete with omega-3s for absorption, and are cause buildup of arachidonic acid (which is inflammatory) in the body. Olive oil contains less of these.
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#24 Old 09-12-2005, 02:30 PM
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Originally Posted by SallyK View Post

Just out of curiousity (and laziness), would the protein amount in home made chickpea hummus be more than in a brand purchased at a store?



probably, if only b/c homemade hummus isn't as "watered down".



yeah, i noticed this awhile ago: hummus is not a great source of protein. but whatever, it's still really really good.



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#25 Old 09-14-2005, 06:52 PM
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2. Saturated fat. There is no evidence from that saturated fat from plant sources is harmful, if a reasonable amount of overall fat is being consumed. In fact, there's some evidence that it's beneficial.



saturated fats are saturated fats man... meaning they've been hydrogenated... and there's plenty of research showing that hydrogenated fats (animal or vegetable) contribute to heart disease
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#26 Old 09-14-2005, 06:58 PM
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Saturated fats are NOT the same as hydrogenated fats. And saturated fats come in different forms that have different effects on our bodied, just like polyunsaturated fats, and some vitamins and minerals.
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#27 Old 09-14-2005, 07:23 PM
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how are they different?



(besides the obvious, that one can exist narturally and one is produced by a chemical process)
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#28 Old 09-21-2005, 10:25 AM
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Whole Foods has an oil-free hummus? What is the name of it?
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#29 Old 09-21-2005, 08:22 PM
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The Whole Foods near me makes oil-free hummus in house, it's just called classic hummus. But Whole Foods doesn't always carry the same stuff at each location.



CanadianSka, hydrogenation produces trans-fats, which are malformed fats that do a lot of damage to your body. The configuration of a trans-fat is very very different from that of a normal saturated fat. If you want to understand more about it, I recommend Udo Erasmus' book Fats that Kill, Fats that Heal.
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#30 Old 09-22-2005, 11:12 AM
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well, first of all, trans fat is not saturated--it is unsaturated. but there are two different kinds of unsat fats--cis and trans. trans are produced by hydrogenation (if it is only "partial" hydrogenation--full leads to sat fats



and yes, trans and cis have different effects on the body because they are processed slightly differently.
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