Going Vegetarian.. Need A Meal Plan - VeggieBoards
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#1 Old 01-02-2005, 09:10 AM
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Hi! My names Megan and i'm 13, i'm trying to go vegetarian but i'm scared i wont get enough protiean in my diet! So before i start i wanted to get a meal plan to know what i should be eating. (i meen a meal plan where it tells you what each meal of the day for about a week or so.) Does anyone know where i can find a meal plan?
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#2 Old 01-02-2005, 09:19 AM
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Protein is very easy to get! ...If you still eat dairy and eggs you are very unlikely to be protein deficient. Beans, nuts, seeds, soy milk, veggie burgers, tofu are great vegan sources. Even dark green veggies, hummus, and whole grains have protein. See its not hard at all!



B - 1C fortified soymilk, whole grain cereal, fruit.

L - Whole wheat bread with bean burger topped with veggies. Lentil soup. Carrots dipped in hummus. Fruit.

S - Celery and PB.

D - Large salad with spinach and romaine, dressing, cashews. Whole wheat noodles mixed with stir fried veggies and tofu.



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#3 Old 01-02-2005, 09:37 AM
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Go to the library and get the book "The Vegetarian Way" by Messina. It offers a lot of information on nutrients in the vegetarian diet, and gives quite a few sample meal plans, as well as some recipes.



A lot of people seem to worry about protein in the vegetarian diet. Let me start you off with this tidbit: Don't! The typical American gets way too MUCH protein, and is actually harming their liver as a result. If you eat a balanced diet of whole grains, fruits, veggies, and legumes, you're fine. A cup of brown rice has five grams of protein. A typical peanut butter and jelly sandwich has 13 grams. One serving of pasta has nine grams. There is protein in your food! Don't fret. There's no protein in PEPSI, mind you... But there is protein in Good For You food. Heck, even broccoli gets 50% of its calories from protein. Broccoli.



Jinga gave a pretty good meal plan, there. But I'm not sure how much food you need in a day! So I'm hesitant to tell you what to eat. I will offer some *ideas* though, and you can pick through them and eat as much food as you're hungry for!



Breakfast can be simple: cereal with milk (dairy, soy, rice, or almond milk is available!), oatmeal, fruit, an energy bar (a lot of us here are fans of the Luna Bar). Or you can have frozen waffles with maple syrup, pancakes, tofu (or egg) scramble, english muffins with nut butters.



I guess you'll be packing lunch to take to school! Try a thermos filled with lentil soup, or chili and tortilla chips on the side. Hummus, with sliced pita bread and veggies for dipping is way easy to grab out of the fridge in the morning. PB and J sandwiches, vegetable wraps or bean burritos.



Dinner can be things like pasta w/ marinara sauce, or pesto. Tofu and vegetable stirfries with brown rice or quinoa. Bean n Rice burritos. Veggie burgers and a side of french fries.



Snacks: Granola bars, fruit (fresh or dried), trail mix, dry cereal, celery w/ PB and raisins, mini english muffin pizzas



Try out some new recipes! Going veg is so fun because you're forced to experiment with all this new food! I fell in love with tabbouli, hummus, falafel, baba ghanouge, samosas, channa dal masala...
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#4 Old 01-02-2005, 10:45 AM
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There is ton's of info here including free pamphlets you can send for.



http://www.vrg.org/nutrition/teennutrition.htm



here is another cool link and new items are being added all the time.



http://www.peta.org/accidentallyVegan/



And one to put your parents mind at ease with many links.

http://www.parenthood.com/articles.html?article_id=4523



each link tells what you will find on that site.

Hope this info helps you out.
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#5 Old 01-02-2005, 11:23 AM
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Everybody gave you some good advice, Megan. I just wanted to say welcome to the world of vegetarianism Good luck....
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#6 Old 01-02-2005, 12:29 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by P1nkButt3rflys View Post

Hi! My names Megan and i'm 13, i'm trying to go vegetarian but i'm scared i wont get enough protiean in my diet! So before i start i wanted to get a meal plan to know what i should be eating. (i meen a meal plan where it tells you what each meal of the day for about a week or so.) Does anyone know where i can find a meal plan?



If you want to make a commitment to vegetarianism last there are two things you need to do. 1 Learn good nutrtion. 2. Learn to cook things you like.





Vegan Outreach has a stellar starter kit.



Please do not let the word "vegan" in it scare you.



The information applies just as much to vegetarians as

vegans. Just add milk and eggs if that is what you are into.



Vegan Outreach will mail you a very nice printed copy for

free. You can also download a pdf version for free or read

it on the web for free.



The kit includes unique and thoughtful essays by

Vegan Outreach founder Matt Ball that will help you

make Vegan Outreach has a stellar starter kit.



It has a better recipe section than most starter kits that

I have seen. Best of all it also has an up to date,

complete, thorough, easy to understand, and brief

nutrition section by Jack Norris, a vegan Registered

Dietician.



Assuming you have a solid reason for starter veg*nism

the two best things you can do to make your commitment to it

last is to learn to good nutrition and learn to cook.



Here is the url:

http://www.veganoutreach.org/starterpack



Vegan Outreach also hosts a web site of health articles

for people on plant based diets:



http://www.veganhealth.org

( has a sample menu plan )



I would ignore the nutrition advice from other veg*n sites

on the web, especially the Animal Rights sites.



Most ( but not all ) of them either have dated, incomplete

or flat out wrong nutrition information.



HTH

My Blog: beforewisdom.com
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#7 Old 01-02-2005, 01:06 PM
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Yay for P1nk! Everybody has given you some great advice. I'll only add some websites and suggestions for some recipes. Learning to cook is a lot of fun and is a skill everybody should have!



www.vegweb.com

www.vegetariantimes.com

www.fatfree.com

www.veganmania.com

www.vrg.org (lots of accurate info on nutrition here, too!)

www.vegsoc.org

www.vegteen.com



Here's some good cookbooks (many of these you could probably find in your local public library):



Vegetarian Times Vegetarian Beginner's Guide

Teen's Guide to Vegetarian Cooking by Judy Krizmanic

Any of the Moosewood Cookbooks by Mollie Katzen

Any of the Vegetarian Times Low Fat and Fast series

Vegan Handbook by Debra Wasserman and Reed Mangels

Vegan Planet by Robin Robertson

How It All Vegan and The Garden of Vegan by Sarah Kramer and Tanya Barnard
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#8 Old 01-02-2005, 04:42 PM
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wow great 2 hear ure thinking og goin veg
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#9 Old 01-03-2005, 08:11 AM
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you just need 2 drink loadsa milk and u can stick 2 eggs too. well, apart from, u cn take beans, carrots, basically all the veggies, but reduce the quantity of those potatoes unless u wanna put on some extra weght . oh, and, u can take some soya beans as well and be sure 2 hv an egg or two in ur meal, since ur woried about gettin proteins lol
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#10 Old 01-03-2005, 08:50 AM
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Here's one weekly vegetarian meal plan (with recipes):

http://www.findarticles.com/p/articl...19255444/print



Some vegan meal plans (you could always alter these to make them ovo-lacto vegetarian):

http://www.vegansociety.com/html/peo.../quickplan.php

http://www.notmilk.com/lawson.html (2 week plan)

http://www.veganhealth.org/articles/meals
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#11 Old 01-03-2005, 09:24 AM
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Here's a vegan meal plan that I really like:

http://www.bryannaclarkgrogan.com/pa...#VEGAN%20MENUS





Here's another sample:

________________________________________

The following is an excerpt from Vegan Nutrition; Pure and Simple by Michael Klaper, M.D. soft bound ISBN: 0929274237 with permission from Gentle World.

________________________________________



Vegan meals can provide sufficient protein, calcium, and iron. Here is a nutritional analysis of two full days of vegan cuisine. Remember, this is just a suggested pattern. There are endless variation of these themes:



Day One



Breakfast

3/4 cup whole grain cereal (rolled oat granola, multigrain hot cereal, etc.) topped by fruit, chopped almonds and raisins, with 1/2 cup soy milk or sunflower milk made fresh in the blender

PROTEIN: 8 g. CALCIUM: 100 mgs. IRON: 2 mgs.



Lunch

Medium green salad with fresh carrots, 1/4 cup alfalfa sprouts, tahini dressing

Tofu (4 oz.) cutlet sandwich - 2 slices whole grain bread, "trimmings" of lettuce, tomatoes, soy mayonnaise

PROTEIN: 30 g. CALCIUM: 440 mgs. IRON 10 mgs.



Dinner

Soup (1 cup) - Bean/Barley/Vegetable, etc.

Garden green salad with Italian dressing

Vegetable/Grain combination main dish (6 oz. serving) (with an added legume feature like tofu, lentils, beans, sprouts, chickpeas, etc.) for example, tofu/millet loaf w/ carrot, onion, & peppers, or oriental-style stir-fried vegetables w/ tofu & cashews. Serve over 1 cup noodles or rice

Side dishes of 1 cup steamed broccoli and/or carrots with nutritional yeast gravy

PROTEIN: 5 g. CALCIUM: 200 mg. IRON: 5 mg.



Snacks

3/4 cup almond and raisin mix consumed during the day, plus any of the following, if desired:

Fruits, frozen juice "pops"

Fruit or vegetable juices

Fruit smoothies

Vegan baked goods - apple pie, banana bread, etc.

Popcorn.

PROTEIN: 5 g. CALCIUM: 200 mg. IRON: 5 mg.





Day Two



Breakfast 4 whole wheat pancakes (4" diameter) topped with maple syrup and/or fruit spread (apple butter, peach compote, etc.)

4 oz. glass soy milk, fruit juice, coffee substitute (Postum, Cafix, Pero, etc.) or herbal tea

PROTEIN: 18 gms. CALCIUM 180 mgs. IRON: 2 mgs.



Lunch One bowl tossed salad w/ 2 tbls tahini dressing

One sandwich (2 slices whole wheat, pumpernickel, rye bread, or whole wheat pita) with 1/2 cup hummus (chick pea spread), lettuce, tomato, 1/4 cup alfalfa sprouts, onion; or 2 tbls peanut butter w/ banana & raisinis

4 oz. glass soy milk (Edensoy, Ah Soy, etc.)

PROTEIN: 27 gms. CALCIUM: 400 mgs. IRON: 10 mgs.



Dinner

Medium Garden green salad with vinegar/nutritional yeast dressing

6 oz. whole wheat or artichoke spaghetti w/tomato sauce (with tofu, Textured Soy Protein and mushrooms)

2 slices whole grain bread with garlic spread

OR one 8 oz. bowl red-bean chili

2 slices whole grain or rye bread

1 cup steamed collards and yellow squash topped w/ tomato sauce and mushroom gravy

PROTEIN: 28 gms. CALCIUM: 420 mgs. IRON: 13 mgs.



Snacks

3/4 cup almond and isin mix and any of the following:

3 peanut butter/oatmeal cookies

4 oz. bowl oat granola and soy milk

Vegan baked goods

Garden green salads

PROTEIN: 5 gms. CALCIUM: 200 mgs. IRON: 5 mgs.
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#12 Old 01-03-2005, 11:17 AM
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Vegan_gal,



No offense, but I find your suggestion of drinking tons of milk and eating a lot of eggs a rather ironic comment considering your user name



There are tons of other vegetarian foods that a good protein sources! My whole wheat pasta last night had 9grams ... and thats before I added all the other stuff.
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#13 Old 01-03-2005, 11:31 AM
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MsBunnicula, thanks so much for posting that info. I often forget about Bryanna's killer menu ideas...I am in a rut myself so this will come in handy!
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#14 Old 01-03-2005, 01:25 PM
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No problem vggiegirl! As I was posting them, I was thinking that I should look through the meal plans again because I have been in a rut as well.
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#15 Old 01-03-2005, 03:42 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vegan_gal View Post

you just need 2 drink loadsa milk and u can stick 2 eggs too. well, apart from, u cn take beans, carrots, basically all the veggies, but reduce the quantity of those potatoes unless u wanna put on some extra weght . oh, and, u can take some soya beans as well and be sure 2 hv an egg or two in ur meal, since ur woried about gettin proteins lol



I am not trying to start an argument here but you may want to read up a bit on vegan nutrition and various veggies. That is a popular misconception about potatos. It is not them but the toppings that put on the pounds. White potatos are used by the body a little slower than sweet but they are not gonna make you fat.
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#16 Old 01-03-2005, 04:18 PM
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Hi Megan,

Good for you trying to go veggie. I went veg at 19 and years later wished I had known enough about eating veg to stick with it. But that was 15 years ago.



Knowing what to combine will help you out quite a bit. All the sites and books people mentioned above are a great starting place. Vegetarians need to combine their foods to get the proper enzymes and complete proteins we need to stay healthy. Here are a few examples:



Peanut butter and whole grain bread

Bean burritos with a corn or flour tortilla--or--bean tacos

Falafel in a pita

Grain based veggie burgers and whole grain bread



Keep some cans of beans (whatever kind you like best. I'm a big fan of black beans, blackeyed peas, and kidney beans), some tortillas, a loaf of whole grain bread, nut butters (peanut or other), falafel/hummous/grain burger dry mix (very cheap and it tastes good. Can be had at any health food store.) This is a good place to start. You can expand on it later.



Make sure to eat your fruits and veggies, and take supplements in case you don't get what you need during the day in food form.
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#17 Old 01-03-2005, 04:39 PM
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Vegetarians need to combine their foods to get the proper enzymes and complete proteins we need to stay healthy.



Vegetarians and vegans do not need to combine foods for complete proteins. That myth went out in the 70's.



As long as a person eats enough whole, nutritious foods - beans, grains, fruits, vegetables - to meet their caloric needs and be satisfied and healthy, they will get enough protein.
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#18 Old 01-03-2005, 04:47 PM
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Originally Posted by vgnwitch View Post

Vegetarians and vegans do not need to combine foods for complete proteins. That myth went out in the 70's.



As long as a person eats enough whole, nutritious foods - beans, grains, fruits, vegetables - to meet their caloric needs and be satisfied and healthy, they will get enough protein.



Absolutely! Variety is the key. I haven't heard the food combining myth in decades.
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#19 Old 01-03-2005, 06:05 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vegan_gal View Post

you just need 2 drink loadsa milk



No, she cannot.



A frequent problem among new vegetarians is fatigue caused by lack of iron. This happens because these people do not do nutrition research before becoming vegetarian. In the mistaken belief that milk is some sort of superfood they substitute milk products for meat. Milk products have next to no iron in them.



If you are interested in learning about vegan and vegetarian nutrition and you don't have a lot of time for reading I would suggest you read this article:



http://www.veganhealth.org/shv/

My Blog: beforewisdom.com
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#20 Old 01-03-2005, 06:07 PM
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Originally Posted by vgnwitch View Post

Vegetarians and vegans do not need to combine foods for complete proteins. That myth went out in the 70's.



No it did not. The "myth" that went out was the veg*ns do not to do combine foods with complimentry amino acid profiles at every meal.

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#21 Old 01-03-2005, 06:16 PM
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No it did not. The "myth" that went out was the veg*ns do not to do combine foods with complimentry amino acid profiles at every meal.



Complimentary amino acids that equal complete protein ... thus you do not have to combine foods for a complete protein.
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#22 Old 01-03-2005, 06:23 PM
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I think that what Beforewisdom meant and what I understand is that proteins still need to be combined (in that you still need to eat all of the different types of protein) but not at every meal-the assumption is that if you are eating a balanced diet, you will consume all of the necessary amino acids anyway.
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#23 Old 01-03-2005, 06:24 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vgnwitch View Post

Complimentary amino acids that equal complete protein ... thus you do not have to combine foods for a complete protein.



Yes, you do.



While many foods have all of the essential amino acids in them they do not have all of those essential amino acids in the amounts needed for humans to make protien. The amino acids these foods have, but not enough of, act as limiting reagents unless that food is combined with another food that has that amino acid in higher quantities. Does not have to be at the same meal, but it does have to happen.



This may help:





##############

From

http://www.eatright.org/Public/Gover...s/92_17084.cfm

( American Dietetic Association Position Paper on Vegetarianism )

#############









*Protein*



Plant protein can meet requirements when a variety of plant foods is

consumed and energy needs are met. Research indicates that an assortment

of plant foods eaten over the course of a day can provide all essential

amino acids and ensure adequate nitrogen retention and use in healthy

adults, thus complementary proteins do not need to be consumed at the

same meal (^*_32_*

<http://www.adajournal.org/scripts/om.dll/serve?action=searchDB&searchDBfor=art&artType=full &id=ajada50142#RJADA50142032>

).



Estimates of protein requirements of vegans vary, depending to some

degree on diet choices (^*_33_*

<http://www.adajournal.org/scripts/om.dll/serve?action=searchDB&searchDBfor=art&artType=full &id=ajada50142#RJADA50142033>

). A recent metaanalysis of nitrogen balance studies found no

significant difference in protein needs due to the source of dietary

protein (^*_34_*

<http://www.adajournal.org/scripts/om.dll/serve?action=searchDB&searchDBfor=art&artType=full &id=ajada50142#RJADA50142034>,*_35_*

<http://www.adajournal.org/scripts/om.dll/serve?action=searchDB&searchDBfor=art&artType=full &id=ajada50142#RJADA50142035>

). Based primarily on the lower digestibility of plant proteins, other

groups have suggested that protein requirements of vegans may be

increased by 30% to 35% for infants up to the age of 2 years, 20% to 30%

for 2- to 6-year-old children, and 15% to 20% for those 6 years and

older, in comparison with those of nonvegetarians (^*_36_*

<http://www.adajournal.org/scripts/om.dll/serve?action=searchDB&searchDBfor=art&artType=full &id=ajada50142#RJADA50142036>

).



The quality of plant proteins varies. Based on the protein digestibility

corrected amino acid score (PDCAAS), which is the standard method for

determining protein quality, isolated soy protein can meet protein needs

as effectively as animal protein, whereas wheat protein eaten alone, for

example, may be 50% less usable than animal protein (^*_37_*

<http://www.adajournal.org/scripts/om.dll/serve?action=searchDB&searchDBfor=art&artType=full &id=ajada50142#RJADA50142037>

). Nutrition care professionals should be aware that protein needs might

be higher than the RDA in vegetarians whose dietary protein sources are

mainly those that are less well digested, such as some cereals and legumes.



Cereals tend to be low in lysine, an essential amino acid. This may be

relevant when evaluating diets of individuals who do not consume animal

protein sources and are relatively low in protein (^*_35_*

<http://www.adajournal.org/scripts/om.dll/serve?action=searchDB&searchDBfor=art&artType=full &id=ajada50142#RJADA50142035>

). Dietary adjustments such as the use of more beans and soy products in

place of other protein sources that are lower in lysine or an increase

in dietary protein from all sources can ensure an adequate intake of

lysine.



Although some vegan women have protein intakes that are marginal,

typical protein intakes of lacto-ovo-vegetarians and of vegans appear to

meet and exceed requirements (^*_29_*

<http://www.adajournal.org/scripts/om.dll/serve?action=searchDB&searchDBfor=art&artType=full &id=ajada50142#RJADA50142029>

). Athletes can also meet their protein needs on plant-based diets

(^*_38_*

<http://www.adajournal.org/scripts/om.dll/serve?action=searchDB&searchDBfor=art&artType=full &id=ajada50142#RJADA50142038>,*_39_*

<http://www.adajournal.org/scripts/om.dll/serve?action=searchDB&searchDBfor=art&artType=full &id=ajada50142#RJADA50142039>

).

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#24 Old 01-03-2005, 06:26 PM
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BTW, at 13 she needs around 1200-1400mg of calcium.
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#25 Old 01-03-2005, 09:03 PM
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Congrats Meg- you've made a great choice. My advice isn't really that different from everyone else's except just make sure you do your research. Everyone here gave you great sites, read through them because you want to make sure going veg is a positive experience for you, and then maybe others will want to go veg with you. Also, get out some pots and pans and start experimenting- the berst part about going veg is the cooking (IMO), it's great when you learn new ways to make old favorites.



Congrats again and good luck!
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#26 Old 01-03-2005, 10:18 PM
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Strict Vegetarians who eat no animal products are often advised to COMBINE beans and grains so they will get complete proteins. This is true, but you do not need to eat the foods together at the same meal.

Most plant sources of protein, such as beans and grains, contain only two to seven of the essential amino acids, so you must eat a variety of these foods to assure that you get them all. However, you can do this over the course of the day or week. Amino acids circulate constantly in your bloodstream and are used as needed. You do not need to eat the foods simultaneously to supply your body with the different amino acids you need.
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#27 Old 01-04-2005, 10:53 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jinga View Post

Vegan_gal,



No offense, but I find your suggestion of drinking tons of milk and eating a lot of eggs a rather ironic comment considering your user name

I'm also having a hard time with that post. It sounds like something an omni would say.



Not saying you're an omni, vegan_gal just saying you sound like one.



I would suggest reading more about vegan nutrition before attempting to answer questions.
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#28 Old 01-04-2005, 11:55 AM
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[QUOTE=beforewisdom]Yes, you do.



While many foods have all of the essential amino acids in them they do not have all of those essential amino acids in the amounts needed for humans to make protien. The amino acids these foods have, but not enough of, act as limiting reagents unless that food is combined with another food that has that amino acid in higher quantities. Does not have to be at the same meal, but it does have to happen.



What I think most of us here, me at least, are referring to when you talk about combining, is the old school rules that proteins needed to be combined at each and every meal. That was what was thought decades ago. Since the term Combining is seldom used anymore, I assumed that is what you were talking about. So, looks like we all agree on this issue!
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#29 Old 01-04-2005, 11:59 AM
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Originally Posted by beforewisdom View Post

Yes, you do.



While many foods have all of the essential amino acids in them they do not have all of those essential amino acids in the amounts needed for humans to make protien. The amino acids these foods have, but not enough of, act as limiting reagents unless that food is combined with another food that has that amino acid in higher quantities. Does not have to be at the same meal, but it does have to happen.





What I think most of us here, me at least, are referring to when you talk about combining, is the old school rules that proteins needed to be combined at each and every meal. That was what was thought decades ago. Since the term Combining is seldom used anymore, I assumed that is what you were talking about. So, looks like we all agree on this issue!
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#30 Old 01-08-2005, 04:18 PM
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Thanks so much everyone!
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