How do I wash Quinoa? - Page 2 - VeggieBoards
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#31 Old 06-25-2013, 06:44 PM
 
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I love quinoa and always wondered about this..  I've washed what I bought from the store but, lots of good ideas in this thread to help out.

 

Thanks

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#32 Old 06-27-2013, 01:19 AM
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I've tried quinoa twice, both times it was bitter. I washed it, but it was a huge pain in the ass mess, I put a paper towel over the strainer to do it. The second time I also cooked it, drained it and rinsed it again before I ate it. Still bitter. I'm highly sensitive to bitter foods though.

Same here. I really wanted to like it, Because I love couscous but wanted to incorporate more verities of grain in my diet, The first time I bought it boxed and washed it in a sieve over a bowl to catch any strays. I washed it a good 10 minutes. It was so bitter one bite made me sick. The next time I bought sprouted quinoa from a local brand that I buy my sprouted rice from and know the quality of their products to be high. I washed it religiously until I couldn't see any hulls. It was the same end result! I hate that it's so bitter because otherwise it is so very couscous like and I know I would enjoy it if it wasn't for the bitterness.

Has anyone else here heard about how western demand for quinoa has made it too expensive for the farmers and locals that first cultivated quinoa and had it as the main staple of their diet for so long to be able to afford it for themselves anymore? I think that's totally messed up. Because it's so trendy here they can't afford to enjoy the benefits of their own crop and heritage grain the way they could for so long before. I keep hearing stories like this of western demand causing other countries to lose so many of their own traditions. It's sad. I wish our country would set up some sort of fair trade for grains and other things we import where they get fair money and a share of the crops for themselves, You know.
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#33 Old 06-27-2013, 03:06 AM
 
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Quinoa in the UK is not expensive especially considering how filling it is. A little goes a long way.

I don't wash it and have never found it bitter.

I also think it is similar to any grain or carb source like wholemeal pasta, brown rice it's bland and boring unless there is a sauce for it or other ingredients mixed in. Quinoa salad with edamame beans in a Ginger and chilli sauce is immense!
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#34 Old 06-27-2013, 04:19 AM
 
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Maybe you guys are just tasting the native taste of Quinoa, Just saying that's possible. I know the first time I tried it, it did tase different to me than anything I have eaten before. however, I am pretty open about trying new foods. What is "bitter" to you guys may just be the natural flavor of the Quinoa coming out. That's what it sounds like to me.

 

However, again, I could be mistaken. Have joy on your path of discovery. ;-)

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#35 Old 06-28-2013, 08:39 PM
 
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I keep meaning to wash my quinoa when I go to make it, but forget every time! But, I haven't had a problem at all with it, no bitter taste after it's cooked. Maybe with certain brands or types you're more likely to get the bitter taste? I don't know.


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#36 Old 06-29-2013, 07:13 AM
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This site has everything you'd want to know about quinoa.

 

http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?dbid=142&tnahttp://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?dbid=142&tname=foodspiceme=foodspice

 

Except the whole thing about the coating--saponin.

I'm like - Isn't that soap? Yeah, and it gets used for detergents!

http://www.ansci.cornell.edu/plants/toxicagents/saponin.html


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#37 Old 06-29-2013, 12:20 PM
 
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Originally Posted by GaiasChild View Post

I keep meaning to wash my quinoa when I go to make it, but forget every time! But, I haven't had a problem at all with it, no bitter taste after it's cooked. Maybe with certain brands or types you're more likely to get the bitter taste? I don't know.

Same. I washed it for a while then forgot and can't tell the difference. I buy it in 25 lb bags a couple times a year.

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#38 Old 06-29-2013, 03:02 PM
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Some is already pre-washed.

Some people are just sensitive to the saponin coating than others.


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#39 Old 08-29-2013, 08:04 AM
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Does anyone remember that 7th grade science lab where some students (and their family members) had the gene to taste the bitter buzz on a strip of paper,

and others didn't?  Our teacher let us take strips home and come back and report on which family members could only taste paper or which could taste the bitterness.

 

For those that could taste the bitterness, there was a visible strong and sudden recoiling to the taste.  I thought the non-tasters were somehow faking and covering up their disgust, and they thought the tasters were exaggerating.  But it was for real for each of us.  When I saw the different responses in my family members, I knew they weren't

clowning around.

 

Anyway, I wonder if there's a chemical component in quinoa that is in the substance on those lab strips?  I know the first time I ate quinoa, I did not know I should wash it, and it tasted DISGUSTING. I remember saying, maybe this box is bad?  I can't believe ANYBODY could eat this and enjoy it.

 

Later on, I had a delicious bean salad at a friend's house and she told me "You must rinse it or buy it pre-washed."  Vegan eating is a learning process!

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#40 Old 11-02-2013, 10:50 PM
 
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I tried to distill what I found on this thread and elsewhere on the internet about rinsing quinoa on my site -- http://www.quinoahealthylife.com/cleaning-quinoa.html

 

I'd be interested in feedback.

 

In summary though, it just seems to me like most processed quinoa has already been de-hulled. And apparently the hull is where the saponins reside.

 

The confusing part is that some people say that the saponins consist of a waxy outer layer. I'm inclined to believe that they're actually referring to the hull itself.

 

I'm having fun trying to figure this out!

 

- Paul Weir

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#41 Old 11-03-2013, 03:17 AM
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I tried to distill what I found on this thread and elsewhere on the internet about rinsing quinoa on my site -- http://www.quinoahealthylife.com/cleaning-quinoa.html

 

I'd be interested in feedback.

 

In summary though, it just seems to me like most processed quinoa has already been de-hulled. And apparently the hull is where the saponins reside.

 

The confusing part is that some people say that the saponins consist of a waxy outer layer. I'm inclined to believe that they're actually referring to the hull itself.

 

I'm having fun trying to figure this out!

 

- Paul Weir

Thanks for the information PW and welcome to VeggieBoards. :up:

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#42 Old 11-03-2013, 04:02 AM
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If you have a Whole Foods, The kind they keep in the bulk bins is prewashed. Even I can eat it when the boxed "pre washed" is too bitter for me. It is much less expensive as well.
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#43 Old 11-03-2013, 04:52 AM
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I put quinoa in a fine mesh seive and rinse it off like I do rice. I think it cooks faster if I do this too, like a pre-soak.

I feel as if the red quinoa needs more washing and tends more towards bitterness.
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#44 Old 11-03-2013, 07:15 AM
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I have some quinoa milk straining right now using this recipe

http://www.food.com/recipe/quinoa-milk-385896

I read that it's so nutritious it is sometimes used as a breastmilk substitute in places where formula is not available. I'm hoping it will taste nice because quinoa is so much cheaper than nuts but I couldn't find any white quinoa so my milk will be a funny colour!

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#45 Old 11-03-2013, 07:14 PM
 
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Thanks, leedsveg! I hope my info is accurate and helpful.

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#46 Old 11-05-2013, 02:30 AM
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Despite two lots of washing - before and after soaking - my quinoa milk does taste a bit bitter :( I think I'll try another batch and sweeten it a bit to see if that helps - otherwise I'll see if I can find another brand as people have found variations by supplier.

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#47 Old 11-11-2013, 07:13 AM
 
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I use a fine sieve and a rubber spatula to scrape out the quinoa, although I think using a cheesecloth would be just easy and I use the cheesecloth in making the quinoa anyway. Here's a foolproof method. 1) RINSE: place the quinoa in your sieve (use one that fits over the rim of your pot) and the sieve in a larger bowl. Cover with cold water, swish around to rinse the quinoa and then remove the bowl to drain. Repeat 3x. 2) BOIL: Place ~3x the volume of water to quinoa in a saucepan and bring to a rolling boil. Pop your rinsed quinoa in the water and boil for 10 minutes. I often add a clove or so of minced garlic to the quinoa for flavor when I begin to cook the quinoa. 3) STRAIN: strain the quinoa through your fine mesh sieve and cover with a cheesecloth folded to fit inside the sieve. 4) STEAM: put 1" of water in your saucepan. Cover and bring to a boil. Once boiling, place the sieve with cheesecloth over the boiling water to steam, place the lid of the pot over the sieve (doesn't need to seal perfectly) and steam for 10 minutes. 5) FLUFF and cool. Remove the quinoa from the steamy heat and fluff with a fork. I love it mixed with chopped veggies and vinaigrette or popped into my favorite brothy soup or tomato soup.
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#48 Old 02-09-2014, 10:37 AM
 
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Might as well bump this thread, I eat a lot of Quinoa...

 

But I bought some prepared the other day at the grocery store, it was very good mixed with tomatoes and other.

 

There's was so fluffy and in that, I mean good. Mine isn't hard or anything but I'd like to get that nice fluff to it similar to the way white rice can be.

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#49 Old 04-09-2014, 12:54 PM
 
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This illustrates why vegans, vegetarians, and health nuts have a rep for being crazy. I've never washed quinoa and frankly I can hardly even taste it in the recipes I make... if you have any seasoning or other ingredients, the texture is the only thing you will notice.

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#50 Old 04-09-2014, 01:24 PM
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This illustrates why vegans, vegetarians, and health nuts have a rep for being crazy. I've never washed quinoa and frankly I can hardly even taste it in the recipes I make... if you have any seasoning or other ingredients, the texture is the only thing you will notice.

It says on the box you have to wash it, apparently quinoa has a natural bitter coating of saponins which dissolve when quinoa is rinsed. I'm not sure why following instructions makes someone "crazy" in your mind... dizzy2.gif

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#51 Old 04-09-2014, 03:11 PM
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Originally Posted by Bill Miller View Post
 

This illustrates why vegans, vegetarians, and health nuts have a rep for being crazy. I've never washed quinoa and frankly I can hardly even taste it in the recipes I make... if you have any seasoning or other ingredients, the texture is the only thing you will notice.

 

Uh...no....what's crazy about preparing something the way it's meant to be prepared?

 
The idea that you don't notice a bad taste is simply because you don't get a bad taste. Like how some people think cilantro tastes good, and some people can't smell asparagus pee. 

Quinoa is coated with saponins, which repels bugs. 

 

Of course you may just be getting quinoa that has been pre-rinsed. If you have it one day and think it tastes bad that's probably why


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#52 Old 04-10-2014, 12:35 PM
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Quinoa does have bitter, soapy-tasting saponins.

You may, however, get a batch that is pre-rinsed.

The grains are quite small. Find yourself a very fine mesh strainer. Possibly one of those reusable coffee filters will also do for small quantities.
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#53 Old 04-18-2014, 06:53 PM
 
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Quinoa has amazing protein value. Has anyone had millet before? You can cook it in water really fast, it springs up in a few minutes, and it's similar to quinoa, less expensive. It's dirt cheap but delicious, I love it with olive oil. 


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#54 Old 04-24-2014, 03:09 AM
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Quinoa has amazing protein value. Has anyone had millet before? You can cook it in water really fast, it springs up in a few minutes, and it's similar to quinoa, less expensive. It's dirt cheap but delicious, I love it with olive oil. 
How do u cook the millet? Do u add it to boiled water and drain it like pasta or do u measure it out like with rice? I have some in a tin and lost directions for cooking?
Also have a bag of amereth. Any ideas about that? Thanks smiley.gif
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