whole grain bread - VeggieBoards
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#1 Old 04-24-2003, 10:02 AM
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I have bought a number of different brands (Koepellinger's natural wheat), one from Canada. The ingredient list is all whole grains (there is no unbleached wheat flour listed) and yet the bread is so soft. How do they do it?



I have made bread many times and it is never that soft.
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#2 Old 04-24-2003, 10:03 AM
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I think they teamed up with the Quilted Northern Bathroom Tissue ladies and they added there special 'softness' touch



hehehehe



No, seriously I have no idea.
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#3 Old 04-24-2003, 10:10 AM
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Is it yeast bread or sour-dough.



It can also depend on the time they give the dough to rise.

And baking time of course.



Did you know that a lot of "whole grain" bread is made of white flour mixed with the other parts of the grain, instead of just grinded whole grains ?
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#4 Old 04-24-2003, 11:32 AM
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The commercial bread I bought says yeast bread and it also has 3 grams of fiber per slice, so I don't think it is white flour mixed in. That is what "unbleached" flour is - it is degermed (therefore not the whole grain). So I assume if I see "whole wheat flour, flax etc. it is whole grain.



There is a bakery near my house that said a lot of bread bakers use "dough conditioners" but I didn't ask more. Maybe that is what mono & diglycerides are.



I have also made my own bread, sourdough & yeast - even ground the flour very fine in the Vitamix myself. It was nowhere near as soft as what I bought. BTW, Koepellinger's natural wheat bread doesn't even have any added fat, it has applesauce. I don't think their bread has anything other than whole wheat flour, yeast, salt, sugar and applesauce. And it is quite soft, but not squishy. Supposedly there are 3 grams of fiber in each slice too. I really wish I knew what the trick was for it to be that soft and moist.
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#5 Old 04-24-2003, 11:33 AM
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Quote:
Originally posted by 1vegan

Did you know that a lot of "whole grain" bread is made of white flour mixed with the other parts of the grain, instead of just grinded whole grains ?



So how do we know the difference when we are buying bread? Is there something on the label we can look for



I have also wondered how some 'whole wheat bread' is so moist, good question
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#6 Old 04-24-2003, 11:38 AM
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To Beansprout - the main thing is not to get bread with "unbleached flour" or "unbleached wheat flour." Another good clue is if there is 1 gram of fiber or less per slice, it is probably not whole grain bread.
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#7 Old 04-24-2003, 11:43 AM
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Jaroslaw :

Thanks for that tip
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#8 Old 04-24-2003, 11:53 AM
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I think it may be the kneading. It can make all the difference in texture. Same with cakes that are overmixed, the texture will be tough and heavy.

A good recipe makes a big difference. It's strange to me too when I see that some recipes have the exact same ingredients,but for some reason one will be a disaster and the other will be perfect.

Anyway, another good tip for whole grain breads is to add vital wheat gluten (also known as pure gluten, or do-pep.) Make sure you get the right stuff though! I'm not referring to high-gluten flours. Vital wheat gluten is the stuff you make seitan out of. Anyway adding a Tablespoon per cup creates magic in your bread results. Pure white breads do not need it because they already have concentrated gluten from having all the bran removed. But whole-grain breads or combination white/whole-grain breads need it. Try it; it will also really lighten your loafs so they aren't like heavy rocks.

You can buy dough conditioners at healthy-type markets in the baking sections. Some contain ginger.
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#9 Old 04-24-2003, 11:56 AM
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By the way, I have a very simple recipe I adapted from "King Arthur" for whole wheat loaf-type bread -- that's what you meant, right? The sandwich, sliced kind?

Let me know, and I'll post it if you want.
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#10 Old 04-25-2003, 12:58 PM
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I had no idea vital wheat gluten would make such a difference. Thanks for the tip.......... I already have some from when I was making a "turkey" roast. Will let you know how it comes out.



Go ahead and post the simple recipe for the wheat bread.



BTW, Strix, the cheese place said orders take about 10 days so it should be delivered sometime the week of 4/27/03.
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#11 Old 04-25-2003, 07:44 PM
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This has been foolproof for me. It has come out perfect every time.

You can make it fatfree with applesauce or use a good oil, such as extra-virgin olive or margarine. Either way it works. I like 3 cups whole grain flour or 2 whole grain + 1 all purpose. This makes a great white bread too, just leave out the gluten.



KING ARTHUR'S CLASSIC SANDWICH BREAD, adapted by Strix



Preheat oven to 350 degrees.



- 3 C Flour (whole wheat, Spelt, all purpose, bread, or

combination such as 2 whole grain + 1 all purpose)

- Vital wheat gluten 1 level-measure Tablespoon per cup of whole

grain flour

- 1 1/4 tsp salt



- 1/2 C soymilk

- 1/2 C + 1 TB hot water

- 2 TB applesauce, level measure, don't heap it! (or 2-4 TB oil or

melted margarine)

- 1 TB sugar (or maple syrup is nice)

- 1 packet active dry yeast (or 2 1/4 tsp instant yeast)



Mix the cold milk with the hot water to make a lukewarm combo. Take a 1/4 Cup of it aside and add it to the yeast and sugar to proof for 10 minutes.



Add the applesauce (or oil/margarine) to the remaining milk/water combo. Whisk together well.



In a large bowl, measure flour (and gluten, if using) and the salt, combine well.



Add the yeast mix to the water/'milk combo. Whisk well, then add it to thet flour and mix till the dough starts to leave the sides of the bowl.



Transfer to a smooth surface and knead 8-10 minutes by hand (or use a mixer with dough hook) till it begins to become smooth and supple. It should bounce back with elasticity when poked with a finger. Do not add more flour.



*you may use a dough mixer or precessor or a bread machine set to the dough or manual cycle. *

**See note



It should be nice and smooth. Transfer to a bowl, cover, and allow to rise in warm spot till puffy, about 1 hour.



shape into a log and place in a greased 8 1/2 X 4 1/2-inch loaf bread pan. cover loosely with greased plastic wrap (or it will stick!) and allow to rise 1 hour. It should rise nicely with a nice dome about an inch or more over the rim of the bread pan.



Bake at 350 degrees for 35-40 minutes (depending on your oven. it should be nicely browned) If you have one of those instant read thermometers it will be 190 degrees. I don't use one.



Remove from oven and from pan and cool it on a wire rack, covering it with a towel, before slicing.



Store in a plastic bag, freeze extras to keep fresh since fatfree breads stale quicker. For the bread with fat, it will last longer at room temperature or refrigerated, if you like.



** Note: sometimes, depending on your elevation, location, weather, your kitchen, etc., the amount of flour needed will vary. You do not want to add a lot of flour; however, if your dough is sticking to your hands and coming off onto your hands, add a tablespoon at a time. It should be a moist, but not wet dough **



It's not as hard as it is long! I just try to be as clear as possible. Let me know if you try this and your results. I'd also like to hear your results if you try another bread! Post it! Good luck. I love making and baking bread. It gets really easy after a while and it gets faster too the more you do it.



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#12 Old 04-26-2003, 12:44 AM
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When I use lecithin in bread it makes the bread softer and less likely to collapse. And the best part of it is that lecithin is a health food and is usually derived from soy beans (though it can be derived from eggs).
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#13 Old 04-28-2003, 04:11 PM
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How much Lecitihin for how many loaves?
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