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#1 Old 12-23-2002, 08:36 AM
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one thing i miss after being veggie is soup. i mean, yeah u can get soup from some places outside but nuthing beats soup at home. oh well i sound ridiculous but anyway i asked my mum to make soup for me and she says she have no idea how to make 'veggie' soup. she says tt why dun she add meat and when i drink it juz take out the meat? -_-! .. i was like Ugh no way! ok i tried making soup myself but then as usual my cooking SUX. i hope that anyone here with any gd soup recepie and post it up for me? i wld prefer soup without any soymilk/milk. i wld be grateful for any help given!
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#2 Old 12-23-2002, 04:47 PM
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There are a few recipes here:



https://www.veggieboards.com/boards/s...&threadid=2797
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#3 Old 12-24-2002, 01:06 PM
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Oh, I love making soup. It is so easy. Make it just like other soup, except instead of boiling a carcass in the water to make broth, boil some vegetable scraps, esp onion, garlic, and celery. They also sell vegetable broth bullion cubes you can add. You can get away with simmering only 30 min or so, but longer is better. Then strain out the limp veggies and add whatever else ingredients.



I like to put in above mentioned veggies with a can of black beans (include juice for extra salt and flavor, if you wish), diced tomatoes, barely, and eggless noodles. Potatoes, sometimes, too.



I then sautee onion and celery and carrots, and then throw those into the broth (once the broth is done.)
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#4 Old 12-25-2002, 10:58 PM
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French peasant soup, potage parmentier is simple and delicious.



The traditional recipe calls for leaks, but plain yellow onions work just as well.



Time for 2 servings: about 26 to 30 minutes. Recipe for 2 servings: gather together about 1/2 a potato and 1/2 a medium onion. You want to have about equal amts of potato and onions after you slice and dice them. Slice the onion into 1/8 inch thick rings. Peel and slice (or slice and peel) the potato into 1/4 inch think slices. (10 min) (Steam them both together in enough water to steam them, in a snug-coverd pot -- start w/ about 1/2 inch of water n the botton of a 2-quart sauce pan. Steam for about 12 minutes -- until the potato slices easily break apart with a fork. Boil most of the remaining water away. (12 min) Mash. (1 min)



While potatoes are cooking, in an electric blender, blend about 2 tablespoons of thawed frozen-sweet-corn kernals in abt 1/2 cup of water. Takes about 20 seconds to blend. Not nec to make it really smooth. (Kernals take abt 30 seconds to thaw -- heat in another pot, with a 1/4 cup of water).



Add pureed sweet corn to the mashed potato onion mixture. Also add freshly ground black pepper and salt to taste, along with a tablespoon of plain olive oil (extra virgin is too strong-tasting for this dish), and some chopped cilantro or parsely (optional). Cilantro is preferable. Add a little more water, if needed, to bring soup to a nice consistency and adjust salt as you adjust water. Heat to boiling hot. Gently simmer about 15 seconds -- long enough to cook the black pepper and cilantro. (Time for this step -- adding the water, corn puree, and seasonings, bringing to boil, and simmering, estimated at 3 min)



Voila. That's it. Your basic soup is done. Now, if you're a French peasant, you just add some butter and cream from the family cow. OK, for la cuisine vegetaliene (spelling? Avalon?), we add almond puree instead. I honestly believe this has a more interesting flavor and character, in combination with the potato-leek or potato-onion soup, than butter or cream, or both, of any quality or quantity. Almonds of course are a good source of dietary oils, fats, that pose much less atherosclerosis risk than dairy fats. In fact, I've heard they may actually reduce one's propensity toward atheroshlerosis, as compared to simply leaving out this almond oil from one's diet.



The almond puree, like the corn puree, can be made while the potatoes and onions are cooking. Rinse out the residue of corn puree from the blender. To make almond puree blend one cup of blanched almonds in about 1.5 cups water -- for about 3 minutes, at fairly high speed, until the almonds have no discernable "pieces" left. Use unchlorinated water. Chlorinated water seems to react with something in almonds and make the puree taste distinctly different than if it was made with non-chlorinated water. 1 cup of almond is the smallest amout a typica blender jar will make. You will have more almond puree than you will need for the amount of soup you made from 1/2 a potato and 1/2 an onion. Suggestions for what to do with it -- later.



Ladle soup into soup bowls. Add about 2 tablespoons of the almond puree, to each bowl, swirling it over the surface, and sort of mixing it in just a little, mixing it in partially, swirling it around a bit. "Marble" your soup with the almond puree. Or just drop a dollop onto the soup, somewhere. Use your visual artistry here.



Diners may want to mix the almond puree more or less thoroughly, as they prefer. Or you may serve the almond puree separately and let diners decide how much to add, as well as how thoroughly to mix it in. There is something to be said for never mixing it in thoroughly, and having a contrast of temperatures, as well as flavors, between the hot potato-onion soup and the partially mixed-in almond puree. The orig French traditional recipe (I adapted this from a Julia Child recipe, who claimed it was a traditional french peasant food, and that they sopped up the bottom of their plates with chunks of bread) calls for adding butter and cream instead of almond milk.



I also make split-pea-barley-white-bean soup. I keep frozen blocks of it on hand. Plus I have a third soup which calls for combining the split-pea-barley-bean soup with the potato-onion soup, and leaving out the almond puree and using sesame oil instead of olive oil and adding a dash or 3 of Tobasco sauce -- not enough to make heat!



I never saute anything, fry anything, or cook in plain oil, in any way, except perhaps for brushing a light film of oil on some things that I bake. At least -- not for my own consumption, in quantity. I think heating oil in the bottom of a pan, directly over a flame or burner, is just a nutritionaly bad idea. Oil gets very hot. Water won't get any hotter than 212 degrees F, it's boiling point. Any hotter -- and it isn't in the bottom of the pot any more -- it turns into a gas. So cooking in water prevents your food from getting much hotter than 212 degrees. Oil, however, will rapidly go to 400 degrees, and food sitting in it will get that hot too -- a bad idea i think. I don't see any flavor advantage, either.



Note that this is a fairly high-protein meal. Yea, it is kind of a whole meal if you serve it with a chunk of bread, or bread and soilmans-sesame-spread, and maybe a small green salad, or a small separate serving of simple steamed vegetable, with olive oil and salt. 5 or 6 asparagas spears maybe, perhaps with a little bit of soilmanssesametahini dressing instead of plain oil and salt. The potatoes have a goodly amount of protein, and the almonds are rather high in protein. The corn has a little protein.
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#5 Old 12-26-2002, 12:16 AM
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Thalia writes:

=======================

boil some vegetable scraps, esp onion, garlic, and celery. ... you can get away with simmering only 30 min or so, but longer is better.

=======================



I firmly disagree. Long simmering wastes energy. The flavors meld together better if you allow the ingredients to soak together cold (marination), than if you keep them soaking together at the temperature at which water boils, for the same amount of time. The prolonged high temperature decomposes the substances that have flavor and aroma. Soaking them together at refrigerator temperature prevents the flavors and aromas from decomposing due to heat, and the melding process works almost as fast at this temp, as it does at water-boiling temp.



My general rule for pureed or mashed things is that if you cut them into pieces as small as possible, then you don't have to cook them as long. A chef's knife makes rapid work of slicing and dicing things. If you also cook in as little water as possible, this also enables you to save on how much cooking fuel (such as gas or electricity) you need. I cook in as little water as possible, then add water to bring the soup to the consistency you want, just before serving it. Just add the water, and heat the mixture just to boiling.



For example let's say you want to make mashed potatos. You could boil 3 whole medium sized potatoes, with or without skins, for 30 miutes, in 3 cups of water. Then pour out all but 2 tablespoons of water (which will have very little potato starch in it), and mash the potatos (peel first if nec). Or you could peel 3 potatoes and make 1/4 inch slices (or slice first and peel the slices) and cook the slices in a covered ot in 3/4 cup of water, for 9 minutes, then mash them in the 2 tablespoons of water (which will be very high in strach, and thick, and add to the nutritive value and flavor and texture of your final product) you will have left, that hasn't boiled away, after 9 minutes of cooking.



Peeling 3 potatoes takes about 6 minutes, slicing takes about 4. Mashing takes a minute. So the total prep time using the peal-slice-steam-mash method is about 20 minutes. The total prep time for the peel-boilwhole-mash method is about 36 minutes.



Plus the peel-slice-steam-mash method results in slightly more finished product from the same amount of potatoes -- due to the quantity of potato starch and potato-flavor essence and potato nutrients that is in the tablespoon of steaming water that you mash in with the steamed pieces.



For soup, to meld flavors, you steam small cut-up pieces of vegetable scraps in as little water as possible for as short a time as possible -- just until they are tender enough to puree with a potato masher or food ricer. This will be too thick for soup. But you can let it cool in the fridge, and sit for an hour or 2 in the fridge, where the flavors will meld, but neither the flavors nor aromas nor the nutrients will decompose nearly as much. Then you add water to the consistency you want, heat, and serve.



I could not think of any situation where I would want to use commerically-produced "vegetable boullion cubes." God only knows what might be in this kind of product.
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#6 Old 12-26-2002, 06:44 AM
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I don't make soup often. The other day I made some and it came out pretty good. (I think so anyways.)



I started by frying two large minced onions in 1 TBSP vegetable oil. I added one minced clove garlic. In a large pot I added one can tomato sauce (28 oz) and one cup water. Then I added the onions and about 1/2 tsp sea salt, parsley, oregano, garlic powder (about 1/4 tsp), and fresh ground black pepper. Added more to taste. Then I just added beans. I used kidney beans (2 cans - 14oz each). I think I'm going to make some for lunch. Im going to add some different spices and beans (probably 3 14oz cans) and see how it comes out. I'll probably add fresh tomato also.
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#7 Old 12-27-2002, 01:28 PM
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Canned beans, Apple? I don't know.



Here is the recipe, in a newspaper column by Julia Child, that I derived my potage parmienter recipe from. Note the date. 1969. I just recently comitted the clipping to digital and tossed out the original decaying newsprint.
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#8 Old 12-27-2002, 01:37 PM
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i like garlic soup too, it's rediculously easy. you just stick a couple cloves of garlic into 2 cups water, bring to a boil, then simmer for a bit. you add whatever you want in the process. cooked noodles, veg bouillon, chopped onion, carrots, celery, chunks of tomato, potato, turnip, whatever. sometimes i'll mix half a cube of bouillon with half a packet of onion soup mix and skip the garlic.



thing with soup is you can make it with whatever you want, taste it, add as you go along til it tastes good.



thanks to this thread i now know what i'm going to make right now. we have no food in the house since we were away, but i do have onion soup mix and bouillon and onion. hurrah!

I'm singin' here to get rid of fear
Hope it disappears right here with the rain
But I know life is pain, not like a fairytale
Meaningless to pray, so just goin' on my way
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#9 Old 12-27-2002, 01:37 PM
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Soilman is the packrat no doubt....1969....the year after I was born. I watch Julia on the dish from time to time and she still has all of her faculties. I think she's pretty close to 90 years old if I'm not mistaken. I hope to be that together at 90
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#10 Old 12-27-2002, 06:09 PM
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I remember watching Julia Child on television around 1969 -- and I thought she was rather quite an oldtimer, then. I'm sure she was quite a lot older than I was; and I was 21. I think she must have been at least 50 in 1969. Maybe past 60. I thought she was the cat's meow, and still do -- very good communicator.
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#11 Old 12-27-2002, 06:18 PM
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Rather than use her recipe they way she describes it, it is much easier, and it saves on energy, if you cook the taters and onions in only as much water as you need to steam them. Then it is much easier to "mash them with a fork" instead of mashing them "in the soup" with a fork. You don't have lots of non-mashable water to pass your fork through, when mashing. The mashing goes much faster without all that water. Then you just add as much water as you need. Plus if you use less water, you use less energy. You only have to heat the bulk of the water for a few minutes, instead of keeping it heated the whole time you are cooking the vegetables. Tremendous energy saving. I see no advantage to doing it the old way. It isn't like i see my way has more advantages and less disadvantages and the old way has less advantages and more disadvantages; it is like my way has all the advantages and no disadvantages, and the old way has no advantages and only disadvantages. Still, people insist on doing it the old way. I don't get it. No one had ever satisfactorily explained to me even one advantage to doing it the old way. I just don't get it.
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#12 Old 12-27-2002, 06:22 PM
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Plus I must say -- try substituting cilantro for parsley. The first time I substituted cilantro for parsley, I had a mouthgasm.



I've never tried substituting watercress for parsley, as Julia suggests -- because I almost never see watercress in either my supermarket or any of the local farmstands.
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#13 Old 12-27-2002, 08:29 PM
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I see canned watercress in the Supermarket near the Chinese food in my town. Have you checked the Chinese section? Or ethnic food section if you have one?
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#14 Old 12-27-2002, 11:46 PM
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wow thx for all these fantastic recipies!! gonna try em outttt!!
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#15 Old 12-28-2002, 09:38 AM
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"Canned" watercress? you must be kidding.
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#16 Old 01-02-2003, 03:59 PM
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#17 Old 01-02-2003, 03:59 PM
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Quote:
Originally posted by soilman

Canned beans, Apple? I don't know.




What's wrong with canned beans?
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#18 Old 01-18-2003, 04:35 PM
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What about soup you can buy at the store? I like tomato soup.
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#19 Old 01-18-2003, 06:13 PM
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I make a big pot of soup at least once a week. These are two of them and are great for beginners because they don't use homemade stock.



Easy Vegetable Soup



4 cups of veggie broth (homemade or 2 veg. cubes with 4 cups water)

2 cans of condensed tomato soup (I like Heinz)

2 cans water

1 large can diced tomatoes (do not drain)

1 can mixed veggies (drained) or a handful of frozen veggies

1 cup small dry pasta (alphabets are good, I used ditali)



1. In a large pot, combine crumbled bouillon cubes, 4 cups of water, tomato soup and 2 cans of water, diced tomatoes (with the liquid) and bring to a gentle boil.



2. Add the mixed vegetables and pasta. Stir and cover.



3. Simmer for approximately 15-20 minutes until the pasta is cooked.



This soup is really good served with a fresh crusty bread like a baguette.





Easy Barley, Bean and Lentil Soup



1 350g package "soup mix" (Pantry Shelf brand or any 350g mixture of barley, beans and lentils)*

10-12 cups vegetable broth (I used broth made from bouillon cubes)

1 28oz can diced tomatoes (with juice)

1 cup mixed vegetables (corn, green beans, carrots)

2 tbsp balsamic vinegar

1 tbsp oregano

1 tbsp salt

1 tbsp pepper



1. Soak & rinse bean mixture until water is clear. Drain and set aside.



2. In a large pot, bring the broth, tomatoes and mixed vegetables to a boil.



3. Add the "soup mix"/legume mixture, balsamic vinegar, oregano, salt and pepper.



4. Reduce heat to low, cover and let simmer for about 45 minutes. Don't taste until after 45 minutes as it will taste "odd" at this point because the flavours haven't cooked together yet.



5. Stir and adjust seasonings. It will most likely need more seasonings and maybe an additional cup or two of water.



6. Re-cover and simmer for another 1 to 1 1/2 hours or until the beans and lentils are tender.



* the soup mix doesn't have a soup base, just a mixture of barley, beans and lentils
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#20 Old 01-18-2003, 07:31 PM
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This is SOOOOO good, no matter what vegetable you use.



Basic Cream Soup

1 medium onion

1 medium celery stalk

1 medium garlic clove

1 Tbsp. olive oil

4 cups chopped vegetable, in 1 in. pieces

5 cups water

2 Tbsp. light miso OR 2 vegetable bouillon cubes

1 1/2 Tbsp. tahini

Freshly ground pepper (optional)



1) Bring water to a boil in a tea kettle or medium pot. Coarsely chop the onion and celery. Thinly slice the garlic.

2) In a soup pot, heat oil, onion, garlic, and celery. Cook and stir 1 minute over medium heat, then add vegetable. Continue cooking and stirring 1 minute longer.

3) Add boiling water and bring back to a boil over high heat. Stir briefly and reduce heat to medium. Cover and cook 8 minutes. Lift cover, stir in miso, and continue cooking and stirring for another 2 minutes, until miso or bouillon cubes dissolve and vegetables are tender. (At this point you may puree soup directly in the pot with a hand blender, liquefying a small amount of soup with the tahini in a seperate bowl and returning it to the pot. OR you can blend soup in a blender in increments, saving 1/4 of the soup in a seperate bowl.....then pulse blend that 1/4 of soup with the tahini for 2 to 3 seconds, allowing the mixture to remain lumpy and textured.....pour this into the rest of the soup and stir.)

Add pepper to taste.



I love using potatoes for the vegetable......and you can add a couple of chopped leeks (including their greens) for some great creamy potato leek soup.



This recipe was from The American Vegetarian Cookbook. Love it!
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#21 Old 01-18-2003, 10:31 PM
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I've got a soup recipe to share. Even my meat-eating husband likes this one.



Vegetarian Minestrone Milanese



Ingrediants:

3 tbsp margarine

2 garlic cloves, minced

1/2 cup sliced onion

1/2 cup diced celery

1/2 cup diced green bell pepper

1/2 cup diced zucchini

3 medium potatoes, peeled and diced

1 large can of diced tomatoes

5 cups vegetable broth

2 cups garbanzo beans (I usually use a big can)

2 tsp vegan Worcestershire sauce

pinch of basil, thyme, and oregano

1 tsp of salt

2 cups cooked penne noodles

1 cup Parmesan cheese (You can substitute soy cheese or not use any at all, if you like.)



Heat the margarine in a large saucepan or kettle. Add the garlic, onion, celery, bell peppers and zucchini, and saute until tender. Add the potatoes and the large can of diced tomatoes and saute for about five minutes.

Pour in the veggie broth along with the can of garbanzos. Also, add the Worcestershire sauce, basil, thyme, oregano and salt. Simmer on medium heat for about 15-20 minutes, until the potatoes are nice and tender. Then stir in the cooked noodles and cheese and cook for two more minutes. You can add more salt if you think the soup needs it. Enjoy!
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