Where do you get your Iron on a raw diet? - VeggieBoards
Forum Jump: 
 4Likes
  • 1 Post By Naturebound
  • 1 Post By Naturebound
  • 1 Post By Tiger Lilly
  • 1 Post By leedsveg
 
Thread Tools
#1 Old 09-15-2014, 05:02 PM
Veggie Regular
 
Tiger Lilly's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 1,617
Where do you get your Iron on a raw diet?

Not to sound like a carnist....But where DO you get your Iron?


I was looking over Freelee's 'Raw Till 4' diet to get some inspiration for meals and I just couldn't for the life of me work out how she was meeting her iron needs.

It's about to be summer here in Australia and I'd like to use that as an excuse to start working out more. It also means I'll be eating more fruit because it's more readily available (plus I need to eat more fruit). But, with working out comes higher Iron needs, which I barely make on a strict vegetarian diet anyway (no eggs, dairy or animals).

So, I was wondering....Are there any fruits that pack a punch when it comes to Iron? Or is the stacks of vitamin C the key to absorbing the Iron?
Tiger Lilly is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
#2 Old 09-16-2014, 08:44 AM
 
Vanilla Gorilla's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: Calgary, AB, Canada
Posts: 89
Freelee eats a lot of dates which have a decent iron content. So do potatoes and dried figs, which seem to be her staples.

Basically any fruit and veggie should have some iron if grown in fertile soil. That said leafy greens are one of the best veggie sources. Consuming them with vitamin c will enhance absorption. Legumes will pack even more, along side more protein which is good if your doing any muscle building.

Last edited by Vanilla Gorilla; 09-16-2014 at 08:48 AM.
Vanilla Gorilla is offline  
#3 Old 09-16-2014, 10:00 AM
Herbivorous Urchin
 
River's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 9,721
Broccoli, leafy greens, dates.

Quote:
"You will always be fond of me. I represent to you all the sins you never had the courage to commit.”
Oscar Wilde, The Picture of Dorian Gray
River is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
#4 Old 09-17-2014, 01:10 AM
Beginner
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Posts: 169
Huge lists and an explanation of heme vs non-heme iron here:
http://www.vrg.org/nutrition/iron.php
anole is offline  
#5 Old 09-17-2014, 06:01 AM
 
kallyho's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Posts: 312
I believe you can enhance the iron absorbtion of leafy greens by cooking them, or as said above, serving them with lemon or orange or something citric right?
kallyho is offline  
#6 Old 09-17-2014, 10:18 AM
 
Reila's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Posts: 34
I don't what kind of fruit contains more iron, but i know for sure that you can take it by eating legumes (especially peas, beans and lentis) and you can assimilate it even better if you add vitamin C (for example if you eat lemons, orange or avocado in the same meal). I hope i was helpfull, sorry for my bad english but i'm italian
Bye!
Reila is offline  
#7 Old 09-17-2014, 07:40 PM
Super Moderator
 
silva's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: U.S.A.
Posts: 8,954
"Where do you get your Iron on a raw diet?"
Just a reminder of the topic!
silva is offline  
#8 Old 09-17-2014, 08:17 PM
Veggie Regular
 
Tiger Lilly's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 1,617
Thanks for all the suggestions!

I thought maybe it was the dates! I have started putting 2 dates in every shake I make, which has really added a nice degree of sweetness. I'm definitely not opposed to doing that more often!

But as Silva points out, yeah I am trying to look at raw versions of Iron more than anything else. It's just that summer in Australia is really, really hot (I assume, having never been out of the country). And so a lot of what I'll be eating in coming months won't necessarily be cooked because that heats the house up even more. In previous years, I just haven't eaten a lot through the summer months, which isn't good for me. I'd like to change that this year
Tiger Lilly is offline  
#9 Old 09-18-2014, 02:20 AM
Veggie Regular
 
Naturebound's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: Minnesota
Posts: 4,609
In addition to dates, figs are another raw plant food with some iron. And pumpkin and sesame seeds too. Leafy greens like raw kale and spinach are good options as mentioned above. Right now I am picturing a big spinach salad with chopped dates, fresh squeezed orange juice and orange slices, bell peppers, and sprinkled with sesame seeds.
Tiger Lilly likes this.

In the end, only kindness matters. - Jewel



To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Naturebound is offline  
#10 Old 09-19-2014, 06:11 PM
Veggie Regular
 
Tiger Lilly's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 1,617
Quote:
Originally Posted by Naturebound View Post
In addition to dates, figs are another raw plant food with some iron. And pumpkin and sesame seeds too. Leafy greens like raw kale and spinach are good options as mentioned above. Right now I am picturing a big spinach salad with chopped dates, fresh squeezed orange juice and orange slices, bell peppers, and sprinkled with sesame seeds.
Spinach salad, you say....I've never had it! But you're right, I should try it!

And I do love sesame seeds. I'm not great with nuts and seeds (I don't digest them properly a lot of the time. Or maybe that's because when I get my hands on them I gorge myself ). But I think they'd be a really nice little topping!

Thanks for the suggestion!
Tiger Lilly is offline  
#11 Old 09-19-2014, 06:37 PM
Veggie Regular
 
Naturebound's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: Minnesota
Posts: 4,609
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tiger Lilly View Post
Spinach salad, you say....I've never had it! But you're right, I should try it!

And I do love sesame seeds. I'm not great with nuts and seeds (I don't digest them properly a lot of the time. Or maybe that's because when I get my hands on them I gorge myself ). But I think they'd be a really nice little topping!

Thanks for the suggestion!
You are welcome!

Another spinach salad I make sometimes is raw spinach with sprouted quinoa, alfalfa sprouts, mushrooms, raw beets, fresh cranberries, and chopped walnuts. No need even for a dressing as the juice and tartness from the beets and cranberries makes it flavorful on it's own, but a splash of balsamic vinegar really brings it out. I can see throwing in some cooked black beans with this in place of walnuts for a more substantial salad.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	Raw Spinach cranberry beet walnut sprouts mushroom sprouted quinoa salad 2.jpg
Views:	88
Size:	124.0 KB
ID:	4554  
Tiger Lilly likes this.

In the end, only kindness matters. - Jewel



To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Naturebound is offline  
#12 Old 09-20-2014, 12:05 AM
Veggie Regular
 
Tiger Lilly's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 1,617
Quote:
Originally Posted by Naturebound View Post
You are welcome!

Another spinach salad I make sometimes is raw spinach with sprouted quinoa, alfalfa sprouts, mushrooms, raw beets, fresh cranberries, and chopped walnuts. No need even for a dressing as the juice and tartness from the beets and cranberries makes it flavorful on it's own, but a splash of balsamic vinegar really brings it out. I can see throwing in some cooked black beans with this in place of walnuts for a more substantial salad.
OoOoooooh basically, anything with mushrooms in it, I will try. I've always loved them!

Told my partner about your first suggestion, he's definitely up for it. So I'll be trying these once the weather gets properly warm.
Naturebound likes this.
Tiger Lilly is offline  
#13 Old 11-04-2014, 05:12 PM
Banned
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Posts: 277
Dates=cavities&eventually tooth loss.

Sufficient levels of Vitamin D are way more important than Iron intake since Vitamin D is required for the absorption of minerals.

Veganessentials carries Vitamin D at a very reasonable price if you live in North America.
cobalamin is offline  
#14 Old 11-06-2014, 02:10 PM
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: Palermo (Italy)
Posts: 4
As also said above, Iron is in: pumpkin seeds, grain sprouts, almonds, walnuts, cashew nuts, pistachio nuts, raisins, dates, artichokes.

While tea, coffee, cola, alcohol, sugar and salt reduce iron absorption, even if they're not raw food.
Grart is offline  
#15 Old 11-07-2014, 10:28 PM
Veggie Regular
 
Tiger Lilly's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 1,617
Quote:
Originally Posted by cobalamin View Post
Dates=cavities&eventually tooth loss.

Sufficient levels of Vitamin D are way more important than Iron intake since Vitamin D is required for the absorption of minerals.

Veganessentials carries Vitamin D at a very reasonable price if you live in North America.
Dates cause cavities? I've never heard of that. Ever.

Vitamin D isn't an issue for me. I live in Australia and walk everywhere. (I also make sure to drink a soy milk fortified with vitamin D, just because the downside of living in a place where sunlight and vitamin D is so readily available, is all that sun cancer....So I practise a lot of sun safety).

Iron is actually an issue for me though, that's why I'm asking. My levels are low, not bad, but low and I'd like to see them get better.
Tiger Lilly is offline  
#16 Old 11-08-2014, 07:09 PM
Banned
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Posts: 277
Do you use sunscreen?
cobalamin is offline  
#17 Old 11-09-2014, 04:45 AM
Veggie Regular
 
Naturebound's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: Minnesota
Posts: 4,609
There are MANY causes of low iron. I code medical charts at work (mostly infusions/injections/cancer etc) and one of the common treatments I code are infusions for iron deficiency anemia. Reasons for it run the gamut from kidney disease to malabsorption from Celiac disease or post gastric bypass to Crohns disease, chemotherapy and various cancers, side effects of other immunosuppressive drugs (for conditions like rheumatoid arthritis etc) and many different types of anemia the patient may already have. Low vitamin D is only one small reason for it, but many patients have normal healthy levels too as evidenced by their labs (I have to look through all this info because often doctors are nonspecific in their consult documentation about underlying causes but insurance companies demand this info in order to reimburse). And most of the patients are not even vegetarian (they are routinely asked by the doctor during the initial consult).

Personally I would work with my doctor to find an underlying cause if indeed it is an issue that is causing symptoms and health problems or it is just a concern. If there is an underlying issue, increasing iron in the diet or even supplementing with D isn't going to solve the problem unless it is from lack of those things themselves (in which case i would have a followup test after a few months of supplementation and increased consumption). Though it is always good practice to make sure you are consuming adequate iron in the diet anyway along with vitamin c and other micro/macronutrients.

In the end, only kindness matters. - Jewel



To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Naturebound is offline  
#18 Old 11-09-2014, 06:04 AM
Banned
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Posts: 277
Gluten sensitivity is another one as you pointed out.

I say Vitamin D because from experience of having the feeling of a steel rod as a spinal cord; like a silverback gorilla. This feeling only occurs from adequate sunshine on the trunk of my body to produce high levels of Vitamin D in conjunction of consuming leafy greens or by the intake of 3500-5,000 IU of Vitamin D supplements during the winter in conjunction of consuming leafy greens.

VDR for the absorption of Iron
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3235806/

Vitamin C works by Iron reduction; its a quick fix, not a long term solution.
cobalamin is offline  
#19 Old 11-11-2014, 07:03 AM
Veggie Regular
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 4,325
No wonder that Lawrence of Arabia, after eating all those dates, eventually went "gummy" in his later years.
Naturebound likes this.

Last edited by leedsveg; 11-11-2014 at 07:11 AM.
leedsveg is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the VeggieBoards forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
If you do not want to register, fill this field only and the name will be used as user name for your post.
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in


Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off