Can Eating Too much Raw Be bad? - VeggieBoards
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#1 Old 08-28-2015, 08:49 PM
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Can Eating Too much Raw Be bad?

I always notice whenever I start eating raw or mainly veggie smoothies I feel amazing and my skin glows. But if I continue consuming it straight for weeks or months it seems to lose it's efficiency. My skin no longer glows or I don't feel as great or even sluggish at times. Why is this?

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#2 Old 08-28-2015, 10:43 PM
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A vegan Registered Dietitian, Jack Norris, has written an article about raw vegan diets:
http://www.veganhealth.org/articles/cooking

One thing to consider is that fruits and non-starchy vegetables are very low in calories - it is therefore easy to accidentally under-consume calories (which will leave you exhausted) on a raw vegan diet. Here are some calorie values for different foods - notice how the fruits and vegetables are extremely low in calories, compared to cooked starchy foods like beans and pasta:

One cup of boiled lentils = 230 calories: http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/...roducts/4338/2

One cup of cooked spaghetti = 174 calories: http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/...d-pasta/5784/2

One cup of strawberries = 49 calories: http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/...-juices/2064/2

One cup of raw spinach = 7 calories: http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/...roducts/2626/2

You can definitely get enough calories on a raw vegan diet, as long as you eat large quantities of fruit, and/or incorporate some high-calorie raw foods (such as nuts and avocados) into your diet.

I'm not trying to disrespect raw vegan diets (please don't take offense, raw brothers & sisters), but at the present time no mainstream vegan organization recommends fully-raw vegan diets. All mainstream vegan organizations recommend that vegans include cooked legumes and whole grains in their diets.

If you are interested in following a raw vegan diet in the healthiest way possible, this book is supposed to be legitimate: http://www.amazon.com/Becoming-Raw-E...5NP9FD7HCRYYES

_________

Specific recommendations for a healthy diet include: eating more fruit, vegetables, legumes, nuts and grains; cutting down on salt, sugar and fats. It is also advisable to choose unsaturated fats, instead of saturated fats and towards the elimination of trans-fatty acids."
- United Nations' World Health Organization
http://www.who.int/topics/diet/en/

Last edited by David3; 08-28-2015 at 10:50 PM.
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#3 Old 08-28-2015, 11:30 PM
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Very easy to under eat on raw, as mentioned above. 1800-2000 calories a day (or whatever your personal needs are) is a TON of food when it's all raw. It is also somewhat difficult to hit all your nutritional requirements long-term because you really need a very wide variety of foods. I also think too little fat (as in low fat RV diets) or too much fat (gourmet RV diets) affects your skin and mood too. Raw food diet plans seem to really go to one extreme or the other regarding fat. I think fat consumption needs is a fine balance and too little or too much doesn't work out well for most people. I think a lot of hardcore RV's don't like to admit that while individually some may thrive on low fat but most people need a moderate amount of fat in their diet. I don't think diets consisting of primarily gourmet foods (which tend to be very high in fat and low by volume in other nutrients) are particularly healthy either. Just my opinion, but I think fat is a serious issue that warrants much more research and consideration than anecdotal individual people who happen to thrive on low/high fat RV diets long term.

You didn't mention if you are a cooked food vegan, vegetarian or omnivore when you go off your raw diet? There are certain nutrients, like B12, iron, selenium, iodine ext... that an omni diet would provide readily and are easier to obtain on a veg or vegan diet that raw vegans must supplement or take special consideration to consume enough of.

I have been on a primarily raw diet (continuously over 75% raw) for about a year. I keep falling back into the 80-ish% raw range. Seems to be where my body feels best. I can't seem to stick to 100% raw, as I loose my glow and energy rapidly, though I feel very good on a primarily raw diet. I think I've accepted including small amounts of cooked grains and beans is something my personal body chemistry responds favorably to. I will continue t strive for as much raw as makes me feel healthy. I think everyone is different and it takes time (and sometimes accepting a few things you don't really want to, like including some cooked foods) to find an ideal diet suited to your bodies needs.
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#4 Old 08-29-2015, 10:29 AM
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A transition for a body and mind into a different more pure state is a long journey... breaking from both physical and mentally attached addictions. There are constant physical withdrawal feelings to deal with and mental changes to understand and break through. Something that we all go through is the noticing that our diet change isn't affecting us positively like it did at certain other previous times. A quick change in appearance and energy is noticeable. We forget (or can) about the positive change or changes when they become standard common experiences.
Wouldn't it be great if our appearance and energy suddenly improved and stayed progressive just because we change diets? No there are repercussions to deal with from years of bad diet to work through.
If you or anybody else have a hard time with a transition it is the way it goes, do not blame it on healthy raw food though. That is not progressive thinking and will not lead to a progressive state of health. An alcoholic or any addict has a hard time doing without the substance of addiction not because the substance is good, but because their (our) state of being is weak.
And I mean that truly and seriously that we are weaklings compared to what we can and should be. Don't think otherwise.
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#5 Old 08-29-2015, 11:55 AM
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raw diets can be very therapeutic in the short term.

but they are very difficult for most people in the long term.

most of us require starch, which must be cooked for satiety and sufficient kcals.

don't worry about purity, high raw is more sustainable than all raw. it might be healthier, too, if it means you have enough kcals and energy to live your life to the fullest. so add some sweet potatoes, possibly beans, brown rice, that kind of thing. you might do better for it in the long run.
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#6 Old 08-29-2015, 01:18 PM
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In addition to the more basic nutritional practicalities (enough calories, etc.) many raw vegetables contain goitrogens, compounds that in excessive doses can cause hypothyroidism. Its mostly a concern with cruciferous vegetables, and some are worse than others. It wouldnt be hard to kill yourself with too much mustard greens for too long, one woman is on record as having even gone into a coma from too much bok choy (which is no where near as strong as mustard greens).
So go easy on known goitrogens.

Symptoms could include drying of skin and hair, sluggishness, general malaise, etc. like all body processes have less energy.
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#7 Old 08-29-2015, 01:57 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Auxin View Post
In addition to the more basic nutritional practicalities (enough calories, etc.) many raw vegetables contain goitrogens, compounds that in excessive doses can cause hypothyroidism. Its mostly a concern with cruciferous vegetables, and some are worse than others. It wouldnt be hard to kill yourself with too much mustard greens for too long, one woman is on record as having even gone into a coma from too much bok choy (which is no where near as strong as mustard greens).
So go easy on known goitrogens.

Symptoms could include drying of skin and hair, sluggishness, general malaise, etc. like all body processes have less energy.



Could you post a link to the study regarding bok choy? Also, please post a link supporting your claim that it "wouldn't be too hard to kill yourself eating too much mustard greens for too long"? How much is "too much"? And, will it actually kill you? We don't want to scare people away from healthy foods!

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Specific recommendations for a healthy diet include: eating more fruit, vegetables, legumes, nuts and grains; cutting down on salt, sugar and fats. It is also advisable to choose unsaturated fats, instead of saturated fats and towards the elimination of trans-fatty acids."
- United Nations' World Health Organization
http://www.who.int/topics/diet/en/
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#8 Old 08-29-2015, 03:20 PM
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#9 Old 08-29-2015, 04:02 PM
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http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?t...eorge&dbid=250
An excerpt from the above linked article...

Contrary to popular belief, foods themselves are not "goitrogenic" in the sense of causing goiter whenever they are consumed, or even when they are consumed in excess. In fact, most foods that are commonly called goitrogenic - such as the cruciferous vegetables (including broccoli, cabbage, kale, and cauliflower) and soyfoods - do not interfere with thyroid function in healthy persons even when they are consumed on a daily basis. Nor is it scientifically correct to say that foods "contain goitrogens," at least not if you are thinking about goitrogens as a category of substances like proteins, carbohydrates, or vitamins. With respect to the health of our thyroid gland, all that can be contained in a food are nutrients that provide us with a variety of health benefits but which, under certain circumstances, can also interfere with thyroid function. The term "goitrogenic food" makes it sound as if something is wrong with the food, but that is simply not the case. What causes problems for certain individuals is not the food itself but the mismatched nature of certain substances within the food to their unique health circumstances.

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#10 Old 08-29-2015, 09:18 PM
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I do not consider raw food that is not combined well to be good food. It can depend on a variety of factors including a persons metabolism, long term diet and health and also the type of foods that are combined together can vary in degree of quality. I have had raw food persons disagree with this and it is surely because they haven't experienced the difference. I get really bad responses from certain bad combining and would actually choose cooked, processed and even mild junk food over certain combinations because they effect me that drastically. I had begun with combining early on and am happy eating mono - one food per meal. After about seven years much of the harsh cleansing withdrawals were mellowed and sensitivities to combing became very pronounced as a bad combination isn't even partake-able as it can put me nearly to a state of needing to lay down and sleep it off. I don't drink soda but given the choice between soda and a vegetable-fruit drink I would choose soda because it would not be as bad as the other.
I don't agree with any definition of what good combining that I have seen on the internet nor are the effects experienced the same, the bloating and digestion problems they report only has begun as my metabolism has slowed down. I have no problem with combining any fruits and melons together, the acidic - sub-acidic thing doesn't bother me. And many definitions say leafy greens are ok with fruit but not for me. I wonder are they reporting from scientific formulas and not from experience? - probably. Everybody is different though when it comes to how they react to combining.

Caring about our health is caring about our very state of being and future which is a very good thing to be seriously concerned about making the most of.

 

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#11 Old 08-29-2015, 10:04 PM
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Originally Posted by cuberail View Post

Thank you, Cuberail. This is from the New England Journal of Medicine, which is definitely a legitimate, peer-reviewed publication. The woman in the case study was eating 1.0 to 1.5 kg (2 to 3 pounds) of raw bok choy daily. This an enormous amount of bok choy; 1 cup of raw shredded bok choy is only 70 grams, so 1.5 kg would be 21 cups of raw bok choy per day! I'm guessing that she may have been juicing it; it would take an awful lot of chewing to eat that much. http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/...roducts/2377/2

_________

Specific recommendations for a healthy diet include: eating more fruit, vegetables, legumes, nuts and grains; cutting down on salt, sugar and fats. It is also advisable to choose unsaturated fats, instead of saturated fats and towards the elimination of trans-fatty acids."
- United Nations' World Health Organization
http://www.who.int/topics/diet/en/

Last edited by David3; 08-29-2015 at 10:11 PM.
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#12 Old 08-30-2015, 01:06 AM
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Theres a short Dr Greger video on the subject of overdosing on cruciferous vegetables [Here]
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#13 Old 08-30-2015, 04:30 AM
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I don't eat even half raw by any means, but I do eat a lot of leafy greens and other cruciferous vegetables, often raw, and I have a very long history of hypothyroidism first diagnosed at the age of 16...27 years ago. I had a goiter way back then which is what prompted testing. At any rate, I have also consumed soy and other foods that could interfere with my thyroid meds etc but for the most part, in moderation, they have not had a negative effect on my thyroid at all. About seven years ago, long before I was vegan, I was in an eating disorder treatment program and back then I could not have dairy because I was extremely intolerant to it (painful cramps, diarrhea, fatigue, body aches and sinus issues), so in this program where I had to eat in a group setting and they provided the food, they gave me soy milk instead. I drank it almost daily for several months and then began to have symptoms of hypothyroid (even while on meds). I normally consumed almond milk at home but they wanted me to drink something more comparable to cows milk in terms of calories, protein etc. I had my TSH checked and it was way over what it should have been. I was able to stop drinking the soymilk after much explanation to the treatment center and within a few weeks I felt so much better. A followup thyroid check showed a normal range TSH.

Fast forward as a vegan over the last few years and I have consumed quite a bit of soy, other phytoestrogens, and cruciferous vegetables, and they have not had a negative impact on my thyroid. However, I eat a variety and space them out and don't use soy every day. I try to consume cruciferous vegetables, soy/phytoestrogens, calcium rich foods etc at least four to six hours away from my thyroid med dose and it seems to work out for me. I am on less thyroid med on average (lower dose of 100mcg compared to 112mcg as an omnivore) as a vegan than I was as an omnivore. And I eat FAR more leafy greens and other fruits/vegetables.

I've dabbled in all raw for short stretches and I would always experience gastrointestinal upset from the increased servings of fruits/vegetables in raw form and I always felt slightly chilled. I think it takes the body a while to adjust to such a drastically different way of eating. I'm always amazed when people say they feel better right off the bat.

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#14 Old 08-30-2015, 05:53 AM
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I'm always amazed when people say they feel better right off the bat.
i think a lot depends on where they are coming from. if they are coming from SAD they will probably feel amazing.

if they are coming from a healthy whole-foods plant-based diet, there might not be that much of a difference.
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#15 Old 09-18-2015, 06:48 AM
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change is good too

Even better than raw feeding is change from 1 feeding style to another(short 1) because during change organism comes from 1 state to completely another 1 & in case u do all correct profits from it.
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#16 Old 09-26-2015, 11:29 AM
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People who eat raw need to basically eat all the time. Grass eating mammals are foraging nearly every waking hour. They have to eat a lot of food. I go for the high starch because I do not have the time to constantly eat. As someone up top said, people who eat raw find it hard to keep up with the calories. It could be that you may need to add some nuts or oil to your diet. There are raw oils out their. One handful of cashews is about 700 calories.
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