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Tracy Collins 02-19-2017 04:12 PM

Vegan and diabetic
 
Hi folks,my first post here. I have recently ( last 2 weeks ) been transitioning from vegetarian to vegan. My issue now is that I am diabetic and have been told the best diet for maintaining a low blood glucose level is that of low carb, high fat. Well I am really struggling on how to go about doing this on a vegan diet and don't really know where to start. I know I need to get all my vitamin and minerals too, but it seems that most vegan diets are based around carbs as the staple. Is there anyone else here who has managed it? Any thoughts or suggestions would be gratefully received.

Tracy x

jessandreia 02-19-2017 06:07 PM

Someone in my family has diabetes type 2, and his doctor told him to moderate carbs and choose whole-wheat or whole-grain over simple carbs when eating them. Didn't exactly mention low carb, though. Didn't mention anything about fat.

It's possible to eat low carb but could be harder to get calories in. You would have to eat a much bigger volume of greens since they are low in calories. For protein, tofu, tempeh, and seitan are fairly low in carbs. For fats, nuts, seeds, and avocado.

David3 02-19-2017 06:43 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Tracy Collins (Post 4060922)
Hi folks,my first post here. I have recently ( last 2 weeks ) been transitioning from vegetarian to vegan. My issue now is that I am diabetic and have been told the best diet for maintaining a low blood glucose level is that of low carb, high fat. Well I am really struggling on how to go about doing this on a vegan diet and don't really know where to start. I know I need to get all my vitamin and minerals too, but it seems that most vegan diets are based around carbs as the staple. Is there anyone else here who has managed it? Any thoughts or suggestions would be gratefully received.

Tracy x


Hi Tracy,

Although some diabetes forums, and even certain physicians, recommend a low-carb diet for diabetes, the American Diabetes Association doesn't agree. In fact, the American Diabetes Association specifically recommends certain high-carb whole foods, such as beans, whole grains, sweet potatoes, berries, and citrus fruits: http://www.diabetes.org/food-and-fit...uperfoods.html . These are among the exact foods included in healthy vegan diets.

The American Diabetes Association also specifically recommends vegetarian and vegan diets for preventing and managing type 2 diabetes: http://www.diabetes.org/food-and-fit...r-vegetarians/ .

Kaiser Permanente - one of the largest health insurance companies in the United States - also recommends vegan diets for helping to treat type 2 diabetes: https://share.kaiserpermanente.org/w...et-booklet.pdf

The American Heart Association states that vegetarians have been shown to have lower rates of diabetes: http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/Health...32_Article.jsp

Because you are treating and managing a potentially dangerous disease, it might be prudent to make 1 or 2 appointments with a Registered Dietitian who specializes in vegetarian nutrition, and in diabetes treatment. A Registered Dietitian will work with you and your physician to help you plan a delicious vegan diet that addresses your health issues.

In the United States, you can find a local Registered Dietitian through this website: http://www.eatright.org . Just click on the "Find an Expert" button, located in the upper-right-hand portion of the webpage.

In the U.K., you can find a local Registered Dietitian on the Freelance Dietitians website: http://www.freelancedietitians.org/

In New Zealand, you can find a local Registered Dietitian through the Dietitians New Zealand website: http://dietitians.org.nz/find-a-dietitian/

In Canada, you can find a local Registered Dietitian at the Dietitians of Canada website: http://www.dietitians.ca/Find-a-Dietitian.aspx .

Tracy Collins 02-20-2017 02:54 AM

Thank you for replying, I am in the UK and it does appear that information if different here. But from my way of thinking it just seems to me that type 2 diabetes is best controlled with weight loss and a vegan diet will help with that regardless of where the lack of calories come from.

Tracy Collins 02-20-2017 03:00 AM

Hi there

You have given me so much to look into here, thank you so much. As I said in my previous reply up there ^ I am in the UK and all diabetics are encouraged to low carb high fat which was always difficult for me anyway because even before I stopped eating meat I never ate much of it because I just didn't like it, so living on meat and veg was really really hard. A vegan diet suits me far better in terms of taste anyway. I am going to go and have a look at the links you have left in your post so I have something to throw back to the diabetes nurse when I next see her ..haha, here in the UK they are a bit feared because they WILL tell you off. Once again, thanks, I really appreciate it. I am in the beginning throws of running again too so I think that will help, Im not a fast or long runner especially a few 5kms a week but that came to a standstill in December ( I'm from Scotland, the weather is not pretty in the winter ) but the suns been shining again the past day or two so time to get back on the horse so to speak, again something I will find better/easier now I can have carbs again!

Many thanks, Tracy x

David3 02-20-2017 08:11 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Tracy Collins (Post 4061114)
Hi there

You have given me so much to look into here, thank you so much. As I said in my previous reply up there ^ I am in the UK and all diabetics are encouraged to low carb high fat which was always difficult for me anyway because even before I stopped eating meat I never ate much of it because I just didn't like it, so living on meat and veg was really really hard.




I am mystified by this, because the British Diabetes Association also recommends that people eat pulses, whole grains, and other high-carbohydrate whole foods: https://www.diabetes.org.uk/Guide-to...balanced-diet/
.

David3 02-20-2017 02:25 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Tracy Collins (Post 4061114)
I am in the UK and all diabetics are encouraged to low carb high fat . . .




Hi Tracy,

Please read the British Diabetes Association's statements regarding low-carbohydrate diets: https://www.diabetes.org.uk/Professi...pe-2-diabetes/ .

The British Diabetes Association states that, although low-carb diets have been proven effective for short-term use (one year or less), there is insufficient data about the long-term safety and effectiveness of these diets. Who specifically is advising all diabetics to follow these diets?
.

Beets&Beats 02-22-2017 04:43 PM

My parents are both on the cusp of diabetes and their doctor recommended weight loss (which can be helped with a healthy vegan diet) but also less animal products, particularly red meat, as evidence is suggesting these all increase the rates of diabetes.
The doctor also mentioned high fat, but not high saturated fat (nuts, oils etc).

I don't think it's low carb so much as slow carb? Balancing carbs with proteins and fats and such?
There's a lot of diabetes in my family so I've read a lot about it. ha.

But am by no means an expert! The posters above seem very sensible :) .

David3 02-22-2017 08:14 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Beets&Beats (Post 4061858)
The doctor also mentioned high fat, but not high saturated fat (nuts, oils etc).
.


Different types of nuts contain different percentages of saturated fat.

1 cup of almonds contains 28% of the maximum recommended daily intake of saturated fat: http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/...roducts/3087/2

1 cup of chopped walnuts contains 36% of the maximum recommended daily intake of saturated fat: http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/...roducts/3138/2

1 cup of macadamia nuts contains 79% of the maximum recommended daily intake of saturated fat: http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/...roducts/3124/2

.

Beets&Beats 02-22-2017 10:21 PM

Mmm. True. But they suggest nuts are great for diabetics and I posit they more mean saturated ANIMAL fats.
The handful of macadamias I just ate apparently had 3g saturated fat. That's very different to a steak or something, no?


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