Helping my daughter transition - VeggieBoards
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#1 Old 05-13-2015, 04:39 PM
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Helping my daughter transition

Our home is a vegetarian home. We buy eggs from a friend who has a small free range flock of birds who get to keep their beaks and eat bugs and live out the entirety of their natural lives with their flock. We also buy limited organic dairy.

As a family we believe in every person having the right to choose their own spiritual path, we are a family of Buddhists, Christians, Agnostics and Atheists who have found a way to share our space.

My 6 year old daughter has been thinking a lot lately about becoming Vegan. She has already stopped eating honey and her and I have visited some local organic dairy farms where she asked the staff some questions that clearly made them very uncomfortable. After looking at the stalls of calves who had been separated from their moms, the stalls with male calves heading off to auction and the milking parlour she decided this process was not acceptable to her.

I am 100% supportive of her choice as the only thing that separates me from a fully vegan diet is the eggs I buy from the above-mentioned farm.

Here is the problem - she hates tofu and all beans and lentils. I am legitimately concerned about her protein consumption.

Right now her average daily intake would be:

Smoothie with almond milk, chia seeds, Vega protein powder with greens, banana and frozen berries.

Almond butter and banana sandwich, carrot sticks, yogurt

Rice, edemame, corn

Snacks are usually fruit, carrots, muffins made with eggs, corn chips or popcorn.

This does not seem sustainable to me. I am open to suggestions.

Her list of unacceptable foods are:

All legumes and pulses
Cooked vegetables
Yams
Tofu
Spicy things

I have considered telling her she can not drop eggs until she is willing to eat some of the things on the above list but I do not want to stand in the way of her own spiritual and ethical journey. We are a home schooling family so we have lots of time to explore this as part of our ongoing studies of food ethics.
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#2 Old 05-13-2015, 06:16 PM
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I have an extremely picky eater who has sensory issues, and he eats quite a bit less variety than your daughter, yet meets all his developmental growth markers.

My sons pediatrician knows the full extent of his diet, and her only recommendation was that he take a multivitamin with iron, because he does not eat much iron rich food.

My son (by choice) lives on; orange juice,peanut butter, bread, pretzels/crackers,air popped popcorn,fruity cereal, milk, cheese, and apples. He has a healthy weight and plenty of energy, does well in school.

He occasionally eats pistachios, corn, and cashews, but not that often. He also enjoys the Morningstar brand vegetarian nuggets.
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#3 Old 05-13-2015, 06:52 PM
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Hi Poppi,


There is a free, easy-to-use nutrition-tracking website, http://www.cronometer.com that you might find useful. Using this website, you can try various food selections (the website has a database of thousands of different foods, both whole and processed), and the website automatically calculates protein (including each amino acid), calories, vitamins, minerals, and fats. It's extremely easy to use. You might find that meeting your daughter's nutritional needs is quite do-able, even with her current food preferences.

How are videos showing how to use Cronometer. Very easy to use:


https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCX4...mh1iJbw/videos
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_________

Specific recommendations for a healthy diet include: eating more fruit, vegetables, legumes, nuts and grains; cutting down on salt, sugar and fats. It is also advisable to choose unsaturated fats, instead of saturated fats and towards the elimination of trans-fatty acids."
- United Nations' World Health Organization
http://www.who.int/topics/diet/en/

Last edited by David3; 05-14-2015 at 07:58 AM.
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#4 Old 05-14-2015, 09:51 PM
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Grains look like they might be good? Things like barley, pastas, oats, etc.

One of the things I've been making recently is pasta with whole barley in the sauce. It helps to cook the barley a little before throwing it in the sauce....how much depends on how you like things. If you plug it into cronometer which is excellent as david as suggested, you will see you can get 27.5g of protein from 50g of barley, 100g of noodles, and 500g of tomatoes. If you scroll down to the amino acids you will see it's kinda short of lysine though(you get for example 50% of your daily protein, but only 40% of specifically the lysine you need.)

That's no problem though because you can get that lysine from another meal. Or simply eat a little more protein than you need per day since it won't hurt you. Sunflower seeds are good for lysine though, they will meet your lysine requirement before your protein requirement. Other things like peanuts and pumpkin seeds are also good. Does your daughter like trail mix? If she were to have trail mix as a snack or part of lunch of something she'd be doing pretty well.


edit----------
I quickly put together a kinda sorta meal plan based around getting protein

Breakfast, oatmeal(75g dry weight of oats)

snack - trail mix containing 25g of peanuts, 25g of sunflower seeds, and 25g of pumpkin seeds

another meal...dinner I guess? 500g tomatoes, 50g barley(dry weight), 100g pasta(dry weight)


With this you get around 1400 calories and about 60g of protein with near perfect lysine coverage and all the other essential amino acides covered no problem.

Now according to the CDC, a six year old needs about 20g
http://www.cdc.gov/nutrition/everyon...s/protein.html

So you'd be getting triple the recommended daily protein with what I suggested and since 1400 calories might not even be enough for her you could easily get four times the amount.

In short, I think you're going to find it very easy to get enough protein for your daughter. Also for fun, try comparing eggs to the items I have suggested. You might be surprised.
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Last edited by odizzido; 05-14-2015 at 10:09 PM.
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#5 Old 05-15-2015, 02:38 AM
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Like others I would also suggest nuts/seeds and higher protein grains such as wild rice, quinoa, millet, brown rice, barley, etc. Whole wheat bread, especially seeded, can be helpful as far as protein and satiety. Vital wheat gluten can be used to make seitan. Seitan is VERY high in protein as gluten itself is a protein. I've made seitan "nuggets" in the past that taste sort of like chicken and have something like 26 grams of protein per serving.

There are raw vegans who thrive on raw fruits and vegetables as well as some nuts/seeds and lots of leafy greens (incorporated into salads and smoothies and wraps etc). Leafy greens, especially lower oxylate ones like kale, collard greens, bok choy, etc are extremely nutritious and offer good sources of calcium, iron, protein, vitamin K etc.

And what about soy milk? It is one of the cheaper plant milks and has a protein content very similar to dairy milk as well as a great source of calcium.
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#6 Old 05-15-2015, 02:53 AM
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Crikey Poppi, that's a very mature 6 year old daughter that you've got there!


Leedsveg.
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#7 Old 05-15-2015, 03:05 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by leedsveg View Post
Crikey Poppi, that's a very mature 6 year old daughter that you've got there!


Leedsveg.
Oops, I totally missed that she was 6 years old! I was thinking teenager in my head. That may explain more why she is a fussy eater. I need to get more sleep and read posts more thoroughly.
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#8 Old 05-15-2015, 04:31 AM
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I don't have much to offer in the way of advice, but I'd like to say that I hope I raise as thoughtful and compassionate a child as your daughter.
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#9 Old 05-15-2015, 04:43 AM
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Tempeh is made from soybeans and has a different texture than tofu. Maybe you could try some recipes with it?
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#10 Old 05-15-2015, 05:41 AM
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White beans blended with some water, lemon juice and whatever herbs or seasonings can make really good veggie dip/salad dressing. It might be a way to disguise some beans into her diet as it eliminates the weird texture that can throw people off.

Otherwise, whole grains are a good source of protein.

Does she like snacking on sunflower seeds/pumpkin seeds?
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#11 Old 05-15-2015, 09:59 AM
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Originally Posted by leedsveg View Post
Crikey Poppi, that's a very mature 6 year old daughter that you've got there!


Leedsveg.
Thanks! I believe in treating children like the people I want them to grow up to be. That includes total transparency about the world we live in and the origins of their food. We are homeschoolers and every year we spend time on Food Ethics which includes everything from where our food comes from to cooking lessons.

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#12 Old 05-15-2015, 03:56 PM
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Originally Posted by azerea_02 View Post
White beans blended with some water, lemon juice and whatever herbs or seasonings can make really good veggie dip/salad dressing. It might be a way to disguise some beans into her diet as it eliminates the weird texture that can throw people off.

Otherwise, whole grains are a good source of protein.

Does she like snacking on sunflower seeds/pumpkin seeds?
Grains are a bit tricky as I have to eat gluten free. Oddly enough we came to Veg*nism by way of Paleo so we are not in the habit of eating grains very often. I have introduced whole grain bread and rice into the kids' diet but I haven't really explored the world of whole gluten free grains.

She does like some nuts and seeds. In fact today I left her unattended with a bag of raw hazelnuts and she ate the whole bag. $7 worth of nuts down the hatch!
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#13 Old 05-15-2015, 03:58 PM
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Tempeh is made from soybeans and has a different texture than tofu. Maybe you could try some recipes with it?
I haven't been able to find any locally as I live in a smallish city on an island. My husband does go to the larger city on the island a couple hours away for work on occasion so I will get him to look there next time he travels.
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#14 Old 05-15-2015, 08:09 PM
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That's good she likes nuts

http://www.webmd.com/food-recipes/20...study-suggests

Quote:
The group who ate the most nuts, peanuts and peanut butter reduced their risk of early death from heart disease and all other causes by about 20 percent, compared to the group eating the least, she said.
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