Workplaces since Sept 11 - VeggieBoards
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#1 Old 01-25-2007, 03:12 PM
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Well just the other day my work place brought in an utterly inane,

paranoid and incredibly inconvenient security system. The big problem is a

new electronic door lock system, and the fact that it has been placed

on a door that has to be passed through in order to reach the fire

escape, if the electronic locks play up the problems are obvious, it is almost certainly illegal.



When I made a big fuss about it, I got threatened with being fired (I

suggested direct action to fix the problem with that particular door

in the building, merely placing an object to keep that door open), and

told that it was to protect our company data and protect us from

terrorists. Despite the fact that it's insane to think that any such

nutter would want to attack a small ISP in New Zealand, the security

would never protect against a terrorist attack anyway.



So what inconveniences and freedoms have you had to give up in your

work place since September 11?



I'm soooo tired of hearing terrorist terrorist terrorist.
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#2 Old 01-25-2007, 03:23 PM
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My company deals with all sorts of national security type stuff, so we've always had tight security - can't get in without ID card, people and cameras guarding everywhere....



But I guess the biggest inconvenience was when we had an anthrax "scare" when a powdery solid was mailed to us but it turned out to be nothing.



Obviously having a lock on a fire escape door should be illegal. Even ours will let us OUT - its getting in that we have more of an issue with.
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#3 Old 01-25-2007, 03:29 PM
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After the Amish school shooting, my high school adopted a policy of keeping the doors locked at all times. That means visitors have to bang on a front door that leads to a stairwell and hope they can be heard in the office and doors have to be propped open for afterschool activities. I'm graduated, but I went with my mother to a music boosters meeting during winter break, and some sports event had just let out. Someone closed the door behind them and we couldn't get in. We couldn't get the attention of the music boosters on the third floor or the athletes practicing in the gym, so I ended up climbing through an open window to open the door from the inside.



Yep. That school is entirely safe, so long as the gunman doesn't have a 4'11" woman as an accomplice or the door isn't propped open as it invariably is as long as someone is inside.
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#4 Old 01-25-2007, 05:16 PM
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I'm amazed that you're getting that in New Zealand. Was there a terrorist attack there recently or something?



I haven't noticed any increased security here, we have the usual security card to get in, and individual passwords. Then again, I wasn't at this company before 2001. I was in University then, and just had a part-time job.
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#5 Old 01-25-2007, 08:09 PM
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No, there hasn't been any terrorist attack, even if there had been, increased security and surveillance would be something that I would have a problem with.



They've done it because vodafone bought the company and they have some idea that crazy people want to attack vodafone.



We live in a peaceful country that has enjoyed a lot of freedom, but it seems that people happily give it up for some feeling that they are safer or because it's thought that we can get more money this way.
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#6 Old 01-25-2007, 08:21 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Satyagraha View Post




So what inconveniences and freedoms have you had to give up in your

work place since September 11?



After the first couple of months of confusion and paranoia?



None.
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#7 Old 01-25-2007, 09:38 PM
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We have RFID entry but you can open the door from the inside without the card. That seems like an elegant solution.
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#8 Old 01-25-2007, 09:49 PM
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My workplace is predominantly young Muslim males and many middle eastern types. I work in what is probably the place safest from the (media generated) terrorist threat. So, no, there have been no changes at all, As-Salaam-Alaikum.
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#9 Old 01-26-2007, 12:01 AM
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I didn't know you lived in NewZealand Satya, wow!!
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#10 Old 01-26-2007, 12:17 AM
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We are in an office building that's locked outside business hours, and the door to our actual office inside the building is always locked. You have to have a keyfob to get into the office; and afterhours, to get into the building. But that's not terrorist related. It's just confidentiality/proprietary information/fcc regulations.
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#11 Old 01-26-2007, 06:42 PM
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The whole building here now has electronic keys rather than the old regular door keys. That happened when our renovations finished. I'm not sure how much the 9/11 attacks or tightened security had to do with any of it: the newspaper has had computer systems and other valuable information it wanted to protect since before that.



We can get out without an electronic key. It's nice sometimes to have the electronic key to get in because I can just wave my purse close to the sensor rather than figuring out which of the many keys on my key ring to use in the dark.



WRT schools, the schools near me have had buzzer systems as long as I can remember. You couldn't get into the school during the school day without pushing the buzzer, telling the secretary who you are, and the secretary letting you in. I suppose a terrorist could impersonate someone or enter when someone else is coming out, but it's unlikely. The buzzer is probably designed more for keeping out salespeople, expelled students, and just keeping tabs on who is and who isn't in the building. In case of a fire, it's good to know who's there and who isn't.

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#12 Old 01-27-2007, 02:24 AM
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The electronic doors allow us to get out to the fire escape and toilets, but not back in.



I object to the fact that we are being automatically treated like criminals, the fact that we have to pass through electronic check points if we go to the toilet is just ludicrous.



They've said it is protection from terrorists, which is rubbish as the doors are made of weak wood and these doors can be pulled open with just a strong yank or pushed open easily with a kick. They've also said that it is to protect from theft, but the theft that happens there is by card carrying employees. They also say it is to protect from people coming in and stealing customer data, but it does not protect customer data from employees that could be paid to get it, I could also easily walk in and connect a hardware key logger on any computer there.



The security, as with most security is merely there because of paranoia, it offers no real protection and just causes inconveniences.



I feel that it automatically treats all employees as if they are criminals and that we need to be monitored.
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#13 Old 01-27-2007, 03:55 AM
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Lots of people are making lots of money from selling security systems to businesses who don't need them. Look to see if the big boss or financial director of your company goes on to a 'security conference' involving golf courses and lap dancers a few weeks before your new security system is installed...
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#14 Old 01-27-2007, 04:56 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Satyagraha View Post

...They've also said that it is to protect from theft, but the theft that happens there is by card carrying employees. ...



I feel that it automatically treats all employees as if they are criminals and that we need to be monitored.



Well, if there is theft going on there because of the employees, then they at least have a reason for that part. At my workplace, there is a lot of theft that goes on by employees.



Having to go through a security point to get to the bathroom is really silly, I agree.
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#15 Old 01-29-2007, 05:39 PM
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Hey Satyagraha, I didn't know you were from NZ, I live in Hamilton. Are you sure that the increased security measures were actually to do with terrorism? It just doesn't sound right. I mean, we haven't been involved in the whole 'war on terror' thing at all. Do you remember Helen Clarke's decision not to send any soldiers to Iraq even though Australia did? I always felt like our deliberate uninvolvement was keeping us safe. For example, when that Kiwi journalist was kidnapped they told him not to worry, they wouldn't be killing him because they 'know that New Zealand doesn't kill Muslims'. And the British journalist with him credited his life to the fact that he was with the Kiwi guy.
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#16 Old 01-29-2007, 08:32 PM
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I have no unusual security issues for a post 9/11 world at my sh!tty job that I am quitting. I don't find there to be anything escelated at my school/work study job, which happens to be a television studio (Milwaukee Public Television).
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#17 Old 01-29-2007, 09:30 PM
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Quote:
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Having to go through a security point to get to the bathroom is really silly, I agree.



He has to go through a point of security to get back to the work area after using the restroom.



That could be necessary due to the design of the building.
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#18 Old 01-30-2007, 08:26 AM
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At the university, pass systems have been installed, at all of the entrances except the main (there are security guys there), and at the laboratories. The first might be places there to prevent theft rather then terrorism, though. The system can be inconvenient, as students don't get passes and always have to enter through the main entrance. Ah well...
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#19 Old 02-09-2007, 10:41 AM
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I find it interesting that since 9/11, there have been no further attacks on American soil - DESPITE the fact that all our resources are not even here to protect us. They are all over in Iraq. But if you watch this video, it will all be explained to you:



http://video.google.com/videoplay?do...learn+sometime
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#20 Old 02-09-2007, 03:52 PM
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There's no security in my building besides an older guy who sits downstairs and says hi to everyone that walks by. This amazes me since I'm right next door, I mean our buildings are literally connected, to the Federal Reserve. There has been massive changes there. Funny. I'm just a block away from the Federal Building. Lovely. If anyone wanted to hit the FR all they would have to do is blow up our building.
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