"Choosing" Mental Illness - Page 2 - VeggieBoards
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#31 Old 02-21-2005, 05:48 PM
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I agree that medication for mental illness is overly perscribed. Such as Ritalin. But I don't think this is unique to mental illness. I think medicine in general is overly perscribed for any type of illness. This causes all kinds of problems, like the way that ear infections are getting more and more resistant to antibiotics.



I agree with Thalia, medications for mental illnesses should be perscribed ONLY by psychiatrists, not by general physicians.
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#32 Old 02-21-2005, 06:26 PM
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I also want to chime in and say that, a lot of times, when people post a thread saying, "I'm so depressed and I don't know what to do" ... well, how are people SUPPOSED to respond? I can't honestly remember if I've ever started a thread like this (I could figure it out, but I don't feel like it) but if I did, I was looking for answers like, "make yourself some chamomile tea, read a magazine, and take a nap." An answer like this says to me, "I care enough to try to help you feel better." not, "it's your own fault for not reading enough magazines or drinking enough chamomile tea."



and yes, people are too quickly diagnosed with all sorts of mental illnesses. And I definitely agree that some people, once they have their diagnosis, will use it as an excuse... "It's okay if I don't show up at work. I'm clinically depressed" etc. Or they get their diagnosis and lose hope: "I'll never feel better because I'm clinically depressed and I'll be this way forever. well that sucks." so... yeah. I don't know.
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#33 Old 02-21-2005, 07:00 PM
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>>I am not saying that these issues (OCD< ADD< ADHD) do not exist. They do. I am saying that I would bet money that these conditions get diagnosed as such more and more as they become more popular crutches. My wife teaches school and sees parents putting kids on medication as an instrument of controlling behavior when all that is needed is discipline. Maybe not extremely common, but, more common now that parents know about ridlin.>>



I would say that, while the type of orientation towards psychopathology you describe likely occurs fairly commonly, the situation is a bit more complicated. I would hazard a guess that many psychiatric diagnoses are being driven by pharmaceutical firms itching to sell their wares. A case in point would be the makers of Paxil advertising social anxiety disorder itself rather than their medication. I'm thinking this sort of marketing has led many who may not have had any psychopathology to begin with to seek medication from their doctors.



With attention deficit disorder, the situation is also exacerbated by underfunded schools. The public school system, as it is currently funded, cannot afford to provide any sort of individualized instruction to its pupils. Thus, those students who fall a bit outside of the norm in terms of their learning style (and attentional orientation) are tagged "ADD" and medicated. I seriously doubt the problem at hand is lacking discipline.



>>Well then, all of these little kids are getting high off of the amphetamines! Because if you are not ADHD, it has the opposite effect.>>



What you say is largely untrue. Give pretty much anyone a low dose of amphetamines, and she will concentrate more effectively. Hell, I've noticed it myself. Also, many people with legitimate cases of ADD can still get off from amphetamines. You are somewhat correct in that there is a higher incidence of paradoxical effects (such as drowsiness) among those with ADD in comparison to so-called normals.



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#34 Old 02-21-2005, 07:06 PM
 
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I've had problems with depression off & on since I was a teenager. Sometimes it's been fairly mild, and I could "tough it out" by being vigilant about diet, exercise, sleep and keeping a routine.



But I've also had paralyzing bouts of severe depression, where I couldn't manage even the smallest details of my life. During one year-long depression, I ended up dropping my classes and losing my job. Eventually, I could barely leave my apartment. There was no amount of exercise, positive thinking, or discipline that could pull me out of that.



So I agree with you, Organica. For a person without a lot of resources (low income, no health insurance), decent mental health care can be next to impossible to find.
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#35 Old 02-21-2005, 07:07 PM
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Yes, they can. They can learn to control certain behaviors in order to avoid negative reactions. But it doesn't make any delusions or hallucinations go away.



Since you have worked with people with some of these problems, have you made any efforts to learn from psychiatrists the facts about different mental illnesses and their various nuances? If you work with a kid with schizophrenia, it would seem like a good idea to start studying up on the disease so you can better work with the kids instead of jumping to conclusions based on a small handful of observations.



But I do agree many people are misdiagnosed. For example, the vast majority of antidepressants are prescribed by general practitioners, not psychiatrists. A big NO NO in my opinion



*shrug*



I'm just stating my observations. She is one example. And I am jumping to conclusions based on what the district psycologist has told me. Not that he is the best certified person either which he is the person to give the diagnosis btw. I'm just saying, this is how the misdiagnosis begin. I understand that people are going to have different opnions on this. It honestly doesn't matter what I think anyways because I am not the one that makes the decisons as to what the child has. I'll try my best no matter what mental illness the child has.





ETA: My point in my above post was that many people are misdiagnosed and people are quick to come up with a label. The point wasn't if I need to make more of an effort at work. I am doing the best I can.
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#36 Old 02-21-2005, 07:08 PM
 
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Organica, while I agree that people do not "choose" mental illness, that's not what has been said in several of the places where I've seen you making this claim. Choosing not to seek help/treatment has been the subject of much debate lately, however.

The ones I pity are the ones who never stick out their neck for something they believe, never know the taste of moral struggle, and never have the thrill of victory. - Jonathan Kozol
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#37 Old 02-21-2005, 08:41 PM
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My family suffers from bipolar illness and depression. I have a mild form of bipolar which allows me to be undmedicated and function in a healthy way, so long as i choose to do the following: Eat well, make what I've learned over time are 'good' choices--which means I may NOT spend all the money just because I'm in a REALLY good mood . I must exercise regularly...or ELSE, and it is really not a good idea for me to drink with any regularity. One drink maybe every two weeks...or less is what's best for me.



I think what we are saying organica...for those of us who've BEEN to hell and back in our lives (I have)...is that you CAN indeed come out on the other side and be healthy. I have a friend who has a much more severe bipolar problem than I do...who can't function without medication. But with medication, she's an excellent special ed teacher and just had a lovely new son...new house, good husband.



What we're saying is that you have to find the door...however it works for you. It's like my friends in AA used to say...one lady said, "You can believe that the little red light on the smoke detector is your higher power if that will help you." Whatever works for you.



But you can't find it as long as you are rooting around in self-pity, self loathing (a terrible problem for some of us in fact) and the idea that your life will always be as it is (a dillusion I in fact suffered from for seven years...until I said to my now X...what, are we going to watch movies and drink ourselves to death slowly?--in fact, he's not opposed to doing that, but I had a problem with it). I got out on my own, and I learned how to live WELL. Without telling myself lies, for the most part...without dilluding myself...with HOPE that there's more to come.



There's nothing Oprah, or Dr. Phil about a person who's actually been there, been at the point of no return and RETURNED. Most of us who preach this stuff do so because WE KNOW IT WORKS!



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#38 Old 02-21-2005, 08:47 PM
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[QUOTE=organica]

Mental illness is as real as diabetes, heart disease or any other *biological* illness.

QUOTE]

Yes, but just like heart disease and diabetes, mental disorders are for the most part treatable and preventable through your own actions, and shouldn't be used as a get out of jail free card.



I had a nervous breakdown at the age of 15 due to dehabilitating OCD, which caused daily panic attacks and left me physically and mentally exhausted. I was told I would have to be on medication for the rest of my life, and there was alot of stuff I couldn't do becuause I knew I would'nt be able to handle it mentally, ie: going to a graveyard, watching a scary movie, going somewhere alone at night, etc. My friends and family had to design their interactions with me around my disorder. To me, this was an unacceptable future.

Luckily I learned to meditate when I was 17, and have been ever since. Through meditation and disciplines such as hard work, excersize, and diet I have got my OCD eating out of my hand. And while I know the tendency to be obsessive-compulsive is there in my mind, I have learned how to not let it affect my life, and I don't need medication or special considerations for it. So I know it's possible from experience.
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#39 Old 02-21-2005, 08:52 PM
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Obviously, I am not talking about seriously mentally ill people and I don't mean to sugar coat anything I'm saying. I think that the mentally ill will always have mental illness...does this mean they cannot live productive lives?



I also realize that at 35 I seem like a bit of a pollyanna...but you did not know me ten years ago when I screwed anything that moved, drank until I couldn't drink anymore, and while I had a really good brain in some sense, I certainly was not at the time capable of finishing college. (I dropped out of more colleges than most people have attended). I thought of suicide and put myself in danger, again and again just to have it hurt less (the great inside hurt).



So when I say these things I do so knowing where a person can go in their lives. Not having 'just been down' every once in a while, but really....unwell.



And yet here I am...one of the most optomistic people I know . Perhaps because I know things can't get worse than they already have been. And that I have....in many ways chosen to leave that life behind. I literally made a concious decision to leave that life and begin again...one foot in front of the other, one step at a time.



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#40 Old 02-21-2005, 08:59 PM
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I'd like to have a conversation about this stuff after a few of you have had a chance to see "Thumbsucker," a film I saw at Sundance that centers around a character who still sucks his thumb as a teenager, much to his father's dismay, and the substitutes that come into his life to replace it.



Anywho...
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#41 Old 02-21-2005, 09:00 PM
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Good post Bethanie. Reminded me of What About Bob. ("baby steppin out the door, baby steppin down the hall...")
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#42 Old 02-21-2005, 09:13 PM
 
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As somone who has suffered from dysthymic-type depression and general anxiety for many, many years, I have learned one very important thing: No matter how low I'm feeling, or how very difficult it is to do, I must keep myself out of the "woe is me" pity party. I will force myself to go for a walk outside, even if I would rather go fetal and cry. I do try meditation, nutritional supplementation, eliminating caffeine and sugar, etc. I try anything I have heard might make me feel better because I feel it's a matter of life or death for me. Sometimes these things make me feel better, sometimes they don't. But I always try. There's just no other option for me.

And any time I have suggested these things to another depressed person, it is only because I'm empathetic and never have I meant to imply "these things will fix you, now get over it"
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#43 Old 02-21-2005, 10:37 PM
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What you say is largely untrue. Give pretty much anyone a low dose of amphetamines, and she will concentrate more effectively. Hell, I've noticed it myself. Also, many people with legitimate cases of ADD can still get off from amphetamines. You are somewhat correct in that there is a higher incidence of paradoxical effects (such as drowsiness) among those with ADD in comparison to so-called normals.



But they're stimulants.
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#44 Old 02-21-2005, 11:18 PM
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True.

So?
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#45 Old 02-21-2005, 11:42 PM
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AMPHETAMINES. If you don't have a chemical imbalance, you will be stimulated. Similar to meth. So if the kids are falsely diagnosed, they will be "high".
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#46 Old 02-22-2005, 12:02 AM
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I feel like I'm one of the few people that could choose to continue towards a path of serious depression or fight my way out of it. My mom suffers from clinical depression. I believe my paternal grandmother did also, and also my mom's brother, and perhaps both of her parents. It's definitely in my genes. Since I've been about 18 I've been at least mildly depressed, but it's been much worse in the past two years. The past 5 months have been really pretty! bad; I really see and feel it getting worse, and I'm terrified of ending up like my mother. I have bought some self-help books, but I know I need more at this point. I'm pretty sure if I don't do something proactive at this point, I will develop full-on clinical depression.



-BUT-



I know this isn't the circumstance of many people dealing with depression, and I definitely understand that this isn't your situation, Organica.



I don't think most people choose to have depression. I think perhaps the only person who could be accused of choosing it would be someone in my situation that doesn't choose to get help. But I think it's definitely something beyond my own actions that has brought me to the state I'm in- I haven't chosen it.



I do think that severe depression isn't hopeless for many of the people who suffer with it, and I hope that you're amongst those who can move past it. I don't think trying to overcome it guarantees that you will, but not trying means you definitely won't.



I haven't read any posts that reflect a 'snap out of it' solution. If someone has any of these posts in mind, could you PM me? Perhaps I'm interpreting some posts differently.
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#47 Old 02-22-2005, 01:19 AM
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I'm really quite sick of the way certain parties on here (& elsewhere) state that mental illness is a "choice". You apparently "choose" to be depressed, bipolar, schizophrenic, borderline, what have you.



No one chooses to have a mental illness but to a large extent, a sufferer can choose their attitude towards managing their illness. As someone who works in the medical field, I've seen patients display positive, negative and completely indifferent attitudes towards managing their illness. And without fail, the one's who cope the best are the one's who are quick to recognise how a negative attitude can dramatically compound their illness.





Quote:
I speak from experience, & I don't see how anyone who hasn't experienced severe, persistent mental illness (& the usual accompaniment, grinding poverty) can say that all I (& other ill people) need to do is join a gym, read "Feeling Good" & have an aromatherapy bath, & I/we will be all better.



These things are not going to cure your BPD, but they are certainly not going to aggravate it either. It's going to be of more benefit to you than taking a lot of tranquilizers and sleeping all day as you previously mentioned that you were doing.



Quote:
Next time you feel like belittling a seriously mentally ill person whose life has been derailed by symptoms, side effects, hospitalizations & stigma, why not just bite your tongue. Real mental illness is life-threatening & needs serious treatment, not ignorance & lectures.



Yes it does, but I don't remember seeing anyone on VB actually lecture you as such. I think most of the people on VB have tried to help you with positive suggestions and support. They may not be the miracle cures you are hoping to hear, but at least giving some of them a go is a step in the right direction towards managing your illness instead of letting it control your life.
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#48 Old 02-22-2005, 05:20 AM
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[QUOTE=ebola



I would say that, while the type of orientation towards psychopathology you describe likely occurs fairly commonly, the situation is a bit more complicated. I would hazard a guess that many psychiatric diagnoses are being driven by pharmaceutical firms itching to sell their wares. A case in point would be the makers of Paxil advertising social anxiety disorder itself rather than their medication. I'm thinking this sort of marketing has led many who may not have had any psychopathology to begin with to seek medication from their doctors.



With attention deficit disorder, the situation is also exacerbated by underfunded schools. The public school system, as it is currently funded, cannot afford to provide any sort of individualized instruction to its pupils. Thus, those students who fall a bit outside of the norm in terms of their learning style (and attentional orientation) are tagged "ADD" and medicated. I seriously doubt the problem at hand is lacking discipline.



>>Well then, all of these little kids are getting high off of the amphetamines! Because if you are not ADHD, it has the opposite effect.>>



What you say is largely untrue. Give pretty much anyone a low dose of amphetamines, and she will concentrate more effectively. Hell, I've noticed it myself. Also, many people with legitimate cases of ADD can still get off from amphetamines. You are somewhat correct in that there is a higher incidence of paradoxical effects (such as drowsiness) among those with ADD in comparison to so-called normals.



ebola[/QUOTE]



I wanted to comment on this. I work in public montessori school while my daughter attends a 'regular' public school...what I've seen volunteering there is that the emphasis is on trying to get all kids to act 'the same' so that teaching can be done (1 teacher, 21 children) effectively. This is difficult obviously, because all children are not the same. I think that often public schools are tempted to medicate children in order to just get them to follow instructions, sit still in a desk and 'be quiet.' And that many parents fight to keep their children unmedicated, when in fact medication should be what happens last, after all other efforts have failed.



I think we are diagnosing in children all sorts of things that are basically childhood behaviors. We are diagnosing some children for having parents who keep them very busy ALL the time, and who are simply stressed out...we are diagnosing children who have too much media entertainment...etc. It bothers me who quick we are to medicate...particularly as many of these medications do NOT have long term studies on children, and we often don't know the risks of the medication.



I've read for instance, time and again, that ritalin helps ALL people concentrate better...not just adhd people. Granted, there are children who need it to concentrate, and I'm not poopooing it's use in those children. It's just my belief that we are mass medicating our society and teaching our children to turn to drugs (legal ones at that) when things are difficult. Instead of learning real problem solving skills and self help skills.



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#49 Old 02-22-2005, 06:12 AM
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I wanted to comment on this. I work in public montessori school while my daughter attends a 'regular' public school...what I've seen volunteering there is that the emphasis is on trying to get all kids to act 'the same' so that teaching can be done (1 teacher, 21 children) effectively. This is difficult obviously, because all children are not the same. I think that often public schools are tempted to medicate children in order to just get them to follow instructions, sit still in a desk and 'be quiet.' And that many parents fight to keep their children unmedicated, when in fact medication should be what happens last, after all other efforts have failed.



I think we are diagnosing in children all sorts of things that are basically childhood behaviors. We are diagnosing some children for having parents who keep them very busy ALL the time, and who are simply stressed out...we are diagnosing children who have too much media entertainment...etc. It bothers me who quick we are to medicate...particularly as many of these medications do NOT have long term studies on children, and we often don't know the risks of the medication.



I've read for instance, time and again, that ritalin helps ALL people concentrate better...not just adhd people. Granted, there are children who need it to concentrate, and I'm not poopooing it's use in those children. It's just my belief that we are mass medicating our society and teaching our children to turn to drugs (legal ones at that) when things are difficult. Instead of learning real problem solving skills and self help skills.



B



Absolutely.



I also think that behavioral problems (real problems, not just being a kid) can come from parenting and not a chemical disorder. I understand what Ebola posted earlier, which is that biochemistry can be modified by many things throughout your life. I'm not trying to suggest a simple black and white between the two. But I do feel that many conditions could be treated without drugs.



My wife was given and anti-depressant by a family med doctor. She did very poorly on the meds. We then decided that she should go to counseling instead. She had very serious problems with depression, and was borderline suicidal at times. She is functioning fine now, without drugs. She has her down times, but nothing dangerous, and she feels good way more than she is depressed.
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#50 Old 02-22-2005, 07:40 AM
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***people take note***

Bethanie and I have again agreed on something!



Quote:
we are diagnosing children who have too much media entertainment...etc.



Kids need to be allowed to be kids. Let them go....make them go outside and play. Let them wrestle and run and build things only to knock them down. Also, we have become a society of people relying on electronic babysitters (TV, video games). I make my kids go outside and play often. Once my daughter answered my demand for them to go out and play with this "But we end up fighting" to which I replied, "Well, that's better than watching TV!"



A bit off topic but relevant to my diagnosis of some of the problems with children today.
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#51 Old 02-22-2005, 07:53 AM
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***people take note***

Bethanie and I have again agreed on something!







Kids need to be allowed to be kids. Let them go....make them go outside and play. Let them wrestle and run and build things only to knock them down. Also, we have become a society of people relying on electronic babysitters (TV, video games). I make my kids go outside and play often. Once my daughter answered my demand for them to go out and play with this "But we end up fighting" to which I replied, "Well, that's better than watching TV!"



A bit off topic but relevant to my diagnosis of some of the problems with children today.



Agrees too. When the kids get really fidgity I take them outside to play freeze tag for a few minutes. It usually helps them concentrate better when we get back. That is one of the benifits of teaching sped. The administration allows it. They would never let the general ed teachers take their kids out for "extra play" although I feel it would be benifical to them too.





I also wanted to comment about the people who are offering advice. I was reading one of the threads in the womens forum where somebody said they read a study that walking outside for 1/2hour each day helps and it was shot down by other people. I don't think people are offering this advice to be rude or indicate that you can choose to be better. I think they are just trying to be helpful, thats all.
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#52 Old 02-22-2005, 08:13 AM
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I don't think anyone was belittling you.



I think they were trying to help . You started several threads asking for suggestions and that is what people gate to you.



You are right some of those things suggested may not be enough to cure you, but if they can't help you neither can posting on veggieboards.



If you are going to get well you are going to have to take charge and go out looking for what will settle you issues.



Best of luck

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#53 Old 02-22-2005, 08:16 AM
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But they're stimulants.



Amphetamines have the effect of turning on parts of the brain that turn other things off in regards to people with ADD/ADHD. That is why taking a LOW dose of amphetamines is calming and improves concentration.

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#54 Old 02-22-2005, 08:21 AM
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Yes, but just like heart disease and diabetes, mental disorders are for the most part treatable and preventable through your own actions, and shouldn't be used as a get out of jail free card.

Which mental disorders? There are many, many different kinds, with varying degrees of severity, causes, treatments, and ability to be prevented.



Autism, Alzheimer's, Aspbergers, dementia, schizophrenia, bipolar, tourettes, developmental disorders (like Down's), OCD, etc. are all very, very, different. I guess what people object to is the assumptions that people make that if you say you have a mental disorder that people start all talking about pity parties, I-did-it-you-can-too, and get out of jail free cards. Please everyone, the point is to try to be understanding to the individual and their situation. For some diseases there is *No good treatment*. Schizophrenia and bipolar have very high rates of suicide. They are very biologically controlled, treatable only to varying degrees for varying people, and very, very, serious disorders. Not very preventable, either.



Where are the people saying autism is overly diagnosed and if you just try really, really hard, you might get over it? The symptoms of autism can also be greatly lessened through non-pharmecuetical means.

Lumping all mental disorders into one giant cateogory adds to the general misunderstanding the public has of mental disorders and belittles the specific challenges that come with specific diseases.



Also, One person's experience might be totally different from someone else's. The catch-22 with severe depression is the self-pity *can be part of the disease*. Severe depression is like a grand illusion that everything is absoulutely horrible and can never be overcome.



http://www.dr-bob.org/tips/dsm4a.html (for a list of just some of the different kinds of mental disorders.)
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#55 Old 02-22-2005, 09:15 AM
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Which mental disorders? There are many, many different kinds, with varying degrees of severity, causes, treatments, and ability to be prevented.



Autism, Alzheimer's, Aspbergers, dementia, schizophrenia, bipolar, tourettes, developmental disorders (like Down's), OCD, etc. are all very, very, different. I guess what people object to is the assumptions that people make that if you say you have a mental disorder that people start all talking about pity parties, I-did-it-you-can-too, and get out of jail free cards. Please everyone, the point is to try to be understanding to the individual and their situation. For some diseases there is *No good treatment*. Schizophrenia and bipolar have very high rates of suicide. They are very biologically controlled, treatable only to varying degrees for varying people, and very, very, serious disorders. Not very preventable, either.



Lumping all mental disorders into one giant cateogory adds to the general misunderstanding the public has of mental disorders and belittles the specific challenges that come with specific diseases.



Also, One person's experience might be totally different from someone else's.



Thalia - Appreciate your thoughful post, it's very informative, you brought up a lot of truths.



I have a twin sister who is schizophrenic and manic depressive, over the last two decades she has disappeared without a trace, been hospitalized, institutionalized and medicated {medications work for some and sometimes they only work for a short period of time}.



People who suffer from mental illness don't exactly live a quality life since it's not always easily controlled.



Organica - Great Original Post, I understand and empathize with what you have to say, thanks for posting.



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#56 Old 02-22-2005, 10:18 AM
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>>AMPHETAMINES. If you don't have a chemical imbalance, you will be stimulated. Similar to meth. So if the kids are falsely diagnosed, they will be "high".>>



I am aware they are amphetamines. FYI, methamphetamine is schedule II and sold under the trade name Desoxyn for the treatment of ADD and morbid obesity.



If you don't believe me, try taking 5 to 10 mg dextroamphetamine and go write an essay or read a textbook. Actually, don't do this, as it would likely be illegal.



Now, if the dose is overshot, top-down attentional faculties will be over-stimulated, leading to the tweaker-syndrome of starting too many projects at once (none of which are ever finished). This is largely true of individuals with ADD as well.



>>I also think that behavioral problems (real problems, not just being a kid) can come from parenting and not a chemical disorder. I understand what Ebola posted earlier, which is that biochemistry can be modified by many things throughout your life. I'm not trying to suggest a simple black and white between the two. But I do feel that many conditions could be treated without drugs.>>



Now, the flip side to my argument that physiology and psychology are intertwined is that non-pharmacological treatments can affect physiology. Cognitive behavioral therapy for the depressed, for example, can alter serotonergic function (in beneficial ways, and without the side-effects of SSRIs).



>>It's just my belief that we are mass medicating our society and teaching our children to turn to drugs (legal ones at that) when things are difficult. Instead of learning real problem solving skills and self help skills.

>>



I largely agree, although this is not really a recent strategy. I believe roughly 60 percent of people need that caffeine to wake up in the morning. And then how many people unwind in the evening with a beer?



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#57 Old 02-22-2005, 11:23 AM
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Organica, if you don't want to hear the same darn thing over and over and over, don't post this kind of thread.



Because you're just going to get the same darn lecture you've read a zillion times.
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#58 Old 02-22-2005, 11:51 AM
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I think "mental" illnesses are just physical illnesses of the brain.
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#59 Old 02-22-2005, 02:55 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Thalia View Post

Which mental disorders? There are many, many different kinds, with varying degrees of severity, causes, treatments, and ability to be prevented.



Autism, Alzheimer's, Aspbergers, dementia, schizophrenia, bipolar, tourettes, developmental disorders (like Down's), OCD, etc. are all very, very, different. I guess what people object to is the assumptions that people make that if you say you have a mental disorder that people start all talking about pity parties, I-did-it-you-can-too, and get out of jail free cards. Please everyone, the point is to try to be understanding to the individual and their situation. For some diseases there is *No good treatment*. Schizophrenia and bipolar have very high rates of suicide. They are very biologically controlled, treatable only to varying degrees for varying people, and very, very, serious disorders. Not very preventable, either.



Where are the people saying autism is overly diagnosed and if you just try really, really hard, you might get over it? The symptoms of autism can also be greatly lessened through non-pharmecuetical means.

Lumping all mental disorders into one giant cateogory adds to the general misunderstanding the public has of mental disorders and belittles the specific challenges that come with specific diseases.



Also, One person's experience might be totally different from someone else's. The catch-22 with severe depression is the self-pity *can be part of the disease*. Severe depression is like a grand illusion that everything is absoulutely horrible and can never be overcome.



http://www.dr-bob.org/tips/dsm4a.html (for a list of just some of the different kinds of mental disorders.)

Hence the "for the most part" in my original post.
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#60 Old 02-23-2005, 08:48 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ludi View Post

Organica, if you don't want to hear the same darn thing over and over and over, don't post this kind of thread.



Because you're just going to get the same darn lecture you've read a zillion times.



Actually, I feel much better about VB now. I feel people understand the issue better, & I feel that future threads about mental illness may benefit from what people have shared in this thread.



I think what has emerged from the discussion is that severe mental illness is not "the blues", & it does not usually respond to treatments for "the blues".



I'm so glad this is out in the open.



Now I'm hoping fellow VBers can post about radical things that *have* helped, or may help, severely mentally ill people, in a non-pitying or -disparaging way.



For instance I am now trying homeopathy & Shambhala meditation to help my BPD. I would be happy to discuss them here when I see more how they are working- at present, it's too soon to tell. These approaches are more structured than self-help stuff like exercise & books & 12 step groups that never helped a bit, so maybe they will prove valuable.
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