Why i hate Cities. - VeggieBoards
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#1 Old 01-01-2014, 09:51 PM
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People ignore you even if you’re in trouble.

 

The fumes.

 

It’s expensive.

 

The noise.

 

The stressful environment.

 

Too many people

 

Everything you don’t want is within 5 minuets.

 

There is no privacy ,try having a pee on your compost pile in the city and see how far that gets you, in fact try having a compost pile!.

 

Everything is too fast.

 

It gives me headaches.

 

There is no one that I know, I’m used to going into my rural town and I know almost everyone.

 

Inhabitants of the same street do not know one another

 

If you ask someone in the city for directions, he will say, 'I'm sorry, I don't have any time… Sorry I'm in a hurry… Excuse me, I'll miss the train… the bus… the car…' He may add: 'The wall, have a look at the wall.'

 

People are no longer referred to by their name or the tribe to which they belong, but by a number. City people do not address one another as fellow social beings or even human entities, but as 'You, who live in apartment number x on floor number x… telephone number x, license plate number on car is x' and so on.

 

i have some short stories that are related to this topic but they are too long to post on this thread so i put them here: https://www.veggieboards.com/t/144263/some-of-my-favourite-short-stories-do-you-have-any/0_60#post_3269628

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#2 Old 01-02-2014, 06:05 AM
 
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I am definitely going to read the short stories. Honestly, everything you just said describes how I feel on a daily basis. I can't move out yet and it is absolutely terrible to be stuck where there is nothing but concrete and businessmen. The day I turn 18 I plan on never returning to the city. I want the raw basics of a free life: homegrown food, a small house I built or even a tent, a companion to travel with, fresh water trickling from a nearby stream, and lots of love for others and myself. That's all one needs in life. People make things so darn complicated now. I'm happy that I've found someone who despises the lack of friendship or warmth found in the average city just as much as I do. 

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#3 Old 01-12-2014, 11:56 AM
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This is exactly why I am moving back outside of the city within a month. :)

 

Do you live in the city?

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#4 Old 01-12-2014, 12:14 PM
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I was raised and worked in big cities most of my life. In 1996, when I was 45, I finally decided to get out, I have roots in the farmland of Wisconsin, and I ended up there. Now I live in a town of about 1000. It's the smartest move I ever made. I'll never go back to the insanity of big city life.


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#5 Old 01-12-2014, 06:40 PM
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Is there some sort of rehab for city folks wanting to be rural?

I've never known the majority (or a sizable minority) of my neighbors, I would have trouble even trying. My city instincts scream danger when people who know where I live know anything about me.

 

I can relate to most the OP said but I, for one, do help people in trouble. It always tends to surprise them tho.

(to pee on compost in the city pee in a jug indoors and water the compost with it, if anyone asks its "liquid compost- you know, soaking water from beans and rice, left over tea, and stuff" ;) )

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#6 Old 01-13-2014, 11:25 AM
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Is there some sort of rehab for city folks wanting to be rural?

 

 Having lived in Rural areas all of my life, I can tell you that there should be some sort of rehab or training involved before city dwellers move to the rural areas.

 1, we don't have a store on every corner because we don't want one on every corner, don't move in then start crying about having to drive 7 miles to the nearest store.

 2, we don't have public transportation because we don't want it, Don't move out to the  rural areas expecting to walk out the front door and catch a bus. Buy a car.

 3, we like our well water, there is no need for you to think that city water should be supplied to our area.

 4, our houses are far apart because we don't want to see you on a daily basis, its not that we don't like you, it just that we like our privacy.

5, yes, you will hear gunshots in the woods, get over it.

 

 basically, check an area out before you move, You should adapt to it, it should not have to adapt to you.

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#7 Old 01-13-2014, 11:45 AM
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I'm okay with the 10-mile drive to the grocery store, and the well water is one of the pleasures of living out here. The septic tank is an education in keeping water-seeking horizontal roots away from distribution lines. I enjoy the deer, wild turkeys, otters, geese, hawks, herons and bluebirds, and we've trapped and relocated a couple of groundhogs over the years, including the one that popped up through a vent and made it into our living room. 

 

But when I hear gunshots in the woods or see neighbor boys tramping around with shotguns in the pasture next door, I don't get over it. I know when it is and isn't hunting season, and the wrong shots at the wrong time do lead to a flurry of phone calls. Last time, it turned out the boys had asked the owner of the land next door for permission to walk the grounds and she knew they had firearms with them. What she didn't know was that they were taking potshots at songbirds. Two dead cardinals later, she had to tell them they were no longer welcome on her grounds. She might've also mentioned the five-figure fine on the books for killing birds of a protected species.

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#8 Old 01-13-2014, 01:34 PM
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I've never lived in a big city but I grew up in the suburbs before moving out to the country a few years ago. Let me tell you, the suburbs aren't any better. Just a bunch of drama and nastiness, which I suspect stems in part from how close you are to your neighbors. Plus there are a million rules and regulations regarding what you can and cannot do with your own property. I have no desire to live any where other than a rural area now. Plus I have horses and some day I'd like to rescue a bunch of farm animals. The downside to living in the country is that in general the people aren't very concerned about animals and they aren't very politically enlightened either. In my area I see a lot of lost, starving hunting dogs and huge, obnoxious tea party signs. However, despite these set backs all the people I've encountered are exceptionally friendly and neighborly. There's a very strong community out here and your neighbors watch out for you. If you're running low on hay in the winter they'll find you some, if you get locked out of your house they'll let you borrow their truck, if you want to learn how to farm they'll teach you, etc. You just have to look past your differences. 

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#9 Old 01-13-2014, 01:43 PM
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I like big cities. I'm glad I moved to the Chicago area.

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#10 Old 01-14-2014, 02:39 AM
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I have never lived totally away from a city in the country, but I have lived in a large city (Columbus Ohio), small town (Crookston Minnesota) and now a mid sized city (Duluth) in that order and strangely in alphabetical order lol.  Each has had it's advantages and disadvantages for me.  Larger cities tend to have more access to the arts, and I have met an incredibly large range of people from different cultures and racial backgrounds.  In high school alone, my best friend was muslim and I had a Jewish friend and friends from very different income levels.  In middle school I had a friend fresh from an African country (Eritiria sp?), and another friend when I was in elementary school from Vietnam.  I worked at the main library of the Ohio State University campus and for Christmas dinners at work we had Japenese and eastern Indian foods.  I had better access to medical care, and so did my sister who suffers with a severe mental illness.  I didn't learn to drive and didn't own a car because public transportation was never a problem.  On the other hand, I hated the fast pace, the rudeness of people, the crowds and long lines everywhere, the pollution and horrible smells.  

I lived in a tiny town in the middle of nowhere and hated it.  I will say I liked the quiet, the slower pace, the friendliness.  It was somewhat cleaner too.  But EVERYONE knew your business.  People didn't take to my family's bisexual tendencies too well either.  Everyone came from similar backgrounds, and if you weren't born in the area you were always an outsider.  I missed the arts. I didn't fit in with the strict protestant beliefs.  I still didn't own a car but I could walk across that tiny town no problem.  However, getting to medical appointments forty miles away in the next town where they were available could be a problem.  I also didn't like the hunting, and during deer season it's all people talked about.  You'd see pickup trucks with dead dear strapped on the back, their faces pinched from the trauma of death.  Everyone owned a gun.  I had to hide my then boyfriend's bullets for his rifle when he would get drunk...just in case.  At any rate, I love where I live now.  It has a good mix of arts, medical services, public transportation, some differing cultures, but also is minutes from wilderness areas and lots of trees, lakes, and trails.  I live right by Lake Superior which is incredible, especially the sunrises.  You still don't get the insane crowds and lines of the bigger cities, although you do encounter rudeness and a somewhat faster pace than a small town or the country.  I don't live in a particularly bicycle or pedestrian friendly town either.  But the animal rights movement is growing here and people are more open to vegetarian and vegan lifestyles/eating.  Education is a huge emphasize up here too.

 

If I were much more financially secure and could rely on having a decent vehicle, someday I would like to live in a small house outside the city but close enough that I don't have to drive too far for my needs, or I could even still cycle into the city.  Winters are brutal here and it's harder for people in rural areas to come into the city for work.  


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#11 Old 01-14-2014, 10:05 AM
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But when I hear gunshots in the woods or see neighbor boys tramping around with shotguns in the pasture next door, I don't get over it. I know when it is and isn't hunting season, and the wrong shots at the wrong time do lead to a flurry of phone calls..

 You would be calling on me all the time.
 I would like to go on record as saying that I have never shot at any animal, so that should put most at ease.

 I like target shooting, Its fun. I might use high power rifles one day, handguns the next.
 Unless you are a member of some super secrete society that has its focus on the ethical treatment of empty coke cans, Milk jugs and Paper targets, I'm sure you would find any fault in my hobby.

  Cans are always in season.

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#12 Old 01-14-2014, 10:41 AM
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 You would be calling on me all the time.
 I would like to go on record as saying that I have never shot at any animal, so that should put most at ease.

 I like target shooting, Its fun. I might use high power rifles one day, handguns the next.
 Unless you are a member of some super secrete society that has its focus on the ethical treatment of empty coke cans, Milk jugs and Paper targets, I'm sure you would find any fault in my hobby.

  Cans are always in season.

We might call once, or our neighbors might, but after that we'd know you do target shooting. And you'd know which properties have cows or horses, and you'd be shooting away from those pastures instead of toward them, or at least well out of range. My guy quietly switched from black powder target shooting to arrows when the beef cattle moved in next door.  :)

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#13 Old 01-14-2014, 11:55 AM
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I've never fired a gun, but I'd like to get a bow and arrows and do some target shooting with that some day. Living in urban/suburban areas, I usually don't have any place open enough to do that, so I've never really gotten into it.

Instead, my outdoor activities are more city-specific, such as rollerblading and walking to the trains every day instead of driving to work. Like I said, I still prefer living in an urban area.

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#14 Old 01-14-2014, 12:15 PM
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I've never fired a gun, but I'd like to get a bow and arrows and do some target shooting with that some day. Living in urban/suburban areas, I usually don't have any place open enough to do that, so I've never really gotten into it.

Instead, my outdoor activities are more city-specific, such as rollerblading and walking to the trains every day instead of driving to work. Like I said, I still prefer living in an urban area.

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There's a cool park near my house (suburban area of the city) that has an archery range. They rent bows and arrows, or you can bring your own. It's pretty fun, we did it a few times. And there is an I Am Diana, Warrior Queen feeling. smiley.gif
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#15 Old 01-14-2014, 12:19 PM
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Having performed at Renaissance Faires, I've done some target shooting there. I almost bought a bow and arrows from the vendor that most of the Rennies buy theirs from one year, but I knew I wouldn't have any place to use it most of the time.

I really should look around here for an archery range. I bet I could find one. This city has everything. Actually, I ought to ask my Boy Scout nephews - they might know of one, other than just at Boy Scout Camp.

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#16 Old 01-14-2014, 12:48 PM
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I live in Portland, which I love, but don't know if it counts as a "big" city. I mean you can escape to the beach, mountain, forest anytime you like. Maybe that's what helps make a more livable vs. not livable city. 

 

I did LOVE living in Samoa (in Humboldt) a little town of less than 200 or so. Just houses, one post office and one place to eat. Peace and quiet on the beach is awesome. I'd move back if it was up to me actually, but the only real issue I have with PDX is the traffic. 


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#17 Old 01-14-2014, 01:04 PM
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I just can't imagine living any place that small. I love living some place where anything I want to do is available.

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#18 Old 01-14-2014, 01:07 PM
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I just can't imagine living any place that small. I love living some place where anything I want to do is available.

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I sort of agree but it depends on how much stuff you like to do and what you enjoy. Some small places have a lot of outdoor activities that big places don't. 

 

One major perk of cities though is the food. In a city it's a lot easier to find vegan/vegetarian food. Small towns can often be a nightmare in that respect, unless it's a 'hippie' town like Humboldt, etc. 

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#19 Old 01-14-2014, 03:34 PM
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I've never seen a vegan themed restaurant  in a small town but I expect the ruralites would have an easier time getting the raw ingredients. I'm phenomenally lucky (for a city dweller) that I live near a market that sells triple cleaned (human grade) brown rice, wheat, corn, beans, rolled oats, etc. in 25 lb sacks at feed-store prices and a good selection of fresh veggies for a fair price. Nearly all supermarkets I go into have those dry staples (minus the whole corn and wheat) in 1 or 5 lb sacks and veggies in smaller spit-shined bunches all for a much higher price.

 

I've heard some rural feed stores or markets do have rolled oats, beans, and triple cleaned grains for animal feed prices. I'll take that over a restaurant serving vegan T-bone steaks any day.

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#20 Old 01-14-2014, 04:09 PM
 
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I just can't imagine living any place that small. I love living some place where anything I want to do is available.

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LOL That is exactly why I love rural living in the bush! I want to walk out my front door and be able to hike or snowshoe with my pooches and enjoy the tranquility of the woods and nature without being interrupted by another noisy human soul. :) I want to be able to let wild pheasants wander and peck their way through my gardens. I want to wake up brew myself a fantastic vanilla bean latte and watch deer meander and graze in the backyard. 

 

I don't mind the occasional trip to a city to peruse museums or galleries, but after 48 hours in a large crowded city I feel myself becoming more stressed and my patience wearing exponentially thin. I need my space and tranquility. 

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#21 Old 01-14-2014, 04:48 PM
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But when I hear gunshots in the woods or see neighbor boys tramping around with shotguns in the pasture next door, I don't get over it. I know when it is and isn't hunting season, and the wrong shots at the wrong time do lead to a flurry of phone calls.

 

 

I’m lucky where I live because we don’t have many game animals, dear are practical non existent in Australia. The closest thing to a game animal we have here in the southern states is the Kangaroo, and thats only because the farmer’s claim that they eat all the pasture. We have duck hunting season which I hate but they stick to the lakes and the closest lake is over an hour away so I don’t see it but I still know its there.
But most of the shooting done in my local area is responsible and only for pest control and livestock protection, like Rabbits, hares, foxes, feral cats, wild dogs, and a few species of invasive birds. I can understand the need for this, I do it myself. None of these pest animals would be here in Australia if humans didn’t introduce them. The only times that I see shooters act irresponsibly is when they come up from the city and run amuck.   


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#22 Old 01-14-2014, 05:01 PM
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**** livestock protection by killing other animals!
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#23 Old 01-14-2014, 06:22 PM
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 Having lived in Rural areas all of my life, I can tell you that there should be some sort of rehab or training involved before city dwellers move to the rural areas.

 1, we don't have a store on every corner because we don't want one on every corner, don't move in then start crying about having to drive 7 miles to the nearest store.

 2, we don't have public transportation because we don't want it, Don't move out to the  rural areas expecting to walk out the front door and catch a bus. Buy a car.

 3, we like our well water, there is no need for you to think that city water should be supplied to our area.

 4, our houses are far apart because we don't want to see you on a daily basis, its not that we don't like you, it just that we like our privacy.

5, yes, you will hear gunshots in the woods, get over it.

 

 basically, check an area out before you move, You should adapt to it, it should not have to adapt to you.

 

I agree with all but 2 and 5 on this one.

The lack of public transportation in regional towns is a real bugbear of mine. With an aging population in most regional areas, on top of either health or education services being at least a 2 hour drive to the next town, there should be more transportation infrastructure for people in regional and rural areas. It doesn't need to be as regular as in the city, but it needs to be improved. Though, yes, if you want to live out in the country, on a property....It's a good idea to get yourself a car and a license. Or life is going to be rough.

And I'm not a fan of gunshots. But then, we had a lot of people (usually from the city) who thought they could just wander onto our property and start shooting animals.



But, I love living in the city. There's so many different people, so much different food! I like not knowing the majority of people around me and if I don't want to go outside and deal with them (because I get worn out and anxious around large groups) then I don't have to! I can order everything over the Internet and it will get here either tomorrow or the next day!

The Internet is faster here, the electricity only goes out every now and then. The bush fires and floods happen on the TV, not in my backyard. I can get a doctor's appointment in the same week that I ring up. I can actually go to a dentist! (Seriously, I hadn't gone to a dentist for about 10 years because I couldn't get in to see one, when I lived in the country).

One day, I'd love to move to a rural area and live the veg*n dream of a sanctuary farm. But for now, I do love living in the city.


 

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#24 Old 01-15-2014, 06:37 AM
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I agree with all but 2 and 5 on this one.

The lack of public transportation in regional towns is a real bugbear of mine. With an aging population in most regional areas, on top of either health or education services being at least a 2 hour drive to the next town, there should be more transportation infrastructure for people in regional and rural areas. It doesn't need to be as regular as in the city, but it needs to be improved. Though, yes, if you want to live out in the country, on a property....It's a good idea to get yourself a car and a license. Or life is going to be rough.

And I'm not a fan of gunshots. But then, we had a lot of people (usually from the city) who thought they could just wander onto our property and start shooting animals.



But, I love living in the city. There's so many different people, so much different food! I like not knowing the majority of people around me and if I don't want to go outside and deal with them (because I get worn out and anxious around large groups) then I don't have to! I can order everything over the Internet and it will get here either tomorrow or the next day!

The Internet is faster here, the electricity only goes out every now and then. The bush fires and floods happen on the TV, not in my backyard. I can get a doctor's appointment in the same week that I ring up. I can actually go to a dentist! (Seriously, I hadn't gone to a dentist for about 10 years because I couldn't get in to see one, when I lived in the country).

One day, I'd love to move to a rural area and live the veg*n dream of a sanctuary farm. But for now, I do love living in the city.


 


Interesting points, and very valid for you and many other people.
 Don't get me wrong, Im not in any way trying to put cities down.
I can order anything on the internet and have it at my home in a day or two also. My internet speed is 50 up and 50 down, I have Verizon fiber.
my doctor will usually see me on the same day that I call.
 The only issue that you mentioned that I can half way agree with is the transportation, however from other places that do have that bus service to their areas, the crime rate went up considerably when the bus route came through, it seems as if the criminal element from the city uses the bus to get out to the rural areas to loot. at least that is what the vast majority of the crime is traced to.
 now as far as crime, I have been in this location for over 20 years, the biggest unsolved crime was, and still is the shooting of stop signs one night.

 I can however see advantages to living in a more urban area if that is what one is looking for.

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#25 Old 01-16-2014, 07:21 AM
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I grew up in a small college town. It kind of has the best of both worlds. HOWEVER, I vowed to live in a large city when I had kids. My mom wanted us to grow up around natural beauty and nature and away from big cities and she succeeded in nurturing an appreciation of nature in my but I want my kids to grow in an environment where they can see lots of human potential. I want urban kids who grow up around lots of human diversity and experience: to hear multiple languages regularly, to see lots of color fashion, to see all kinds of careers, etc. I don't want my kids to feel like their options are limited - because if they can see it, they can be it.

 

I also happen to think that city-living is more environmentally-friendly. City-dwellers can pool resources and take up less room per capita. Energy use can be organized more efficiently in cities. Example: there's always public transportation in cities.

 

And the cities are often more politically progressive, too.

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#26 Old 01-16-2014, 01:34 PM
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If a child grows up feeling like there are limited options, that would be more on the parents than the place they live.
 I also tend to look at the environmentally friendly part a bit differently also. For instance, I have 5 wooded acres that act as a watershed buffer to the river and then the bay. If you go into Baltimore, what you see is nothing but pavement that the garbage all goes into a storm drain or directly into the bay. The rural area I live in does much less harm per person than those living in the city. Taking up less room might not always work to the advantage.
 My home has solar, I was going to install a windmill however where I am at does not produce the average wind speeds to make it a viable expense.
 I really hate public transportation, I feel like I end up on their time vs my time. Shopping would be a serious pain if I had to take a bus to do so.
 As far as politically progressive, Im not sure if you are saying you want to force your kids to be progressive or not, it almost sounds like it. But I do know that cities like Baltimore are more of a drain on the state than they are a value financially speaking.

 

 Now, If I get the desire to experience the city and all it has to offer, I can drive to a metro station, catch a ride into DC and explore for the day knowing full well that when I get home at night, I will be able to sit and listen to no noise at all on my back porch while sipping a coffee.

 

 I prefer the slower life to the fast pace of a city, I would rather look out of my window and see deer instead of pavement and row houses, I like knowing that my car will be in the same spot in the morning as it was when I got out of it at night, and without any new dents or scratches.

 What I DO like about cities is that they attract way more people than the country, helps keep the area Im in less congested.

 

 But I certainly hold no ill will to those that prefer city living,, I just don't understand it.

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#27 Old 01-17-2014, 02:42 AM
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If a child grows up feeling like there are limited options, that would be more on the parents than the place they live.
 

I can see this to a point, but that isn't always the case.  Had I not grown up in a large city, I would not have met and learned about such a wide diversity of people from those people themselves.  I had friends, teachers, and acquaintances from all over the world...Eritrea, parts of Japan and Vietnam, Paris, Moscow, Puerto Rico .  I had an orthodox muslim friend and Jewish friend and even a Jehovah Witness friend.  I was exposed to various forms of dance and visual arts. I got to see Martha Graham live, and the Vaganova (now St. Petersburg) ballet.   I had access to huge libraries (this was in the 80's before the internet, but even today libraries, such as medical ones, offer more detail and professional services than one could find just googling on the internet).  Parents are not the only influence on a child's life.  School, the surrounding community, friends, churchs and other religious affiliations, all help shape children's lives.  In a larger city there are going to be more people and hence more exposure to diverse viewpoints.  On the otherhand there can also be more bad influence too, more opportunities for drugs, gangs, etc.

 

This isn't necessarily better than being raised in a rural area by any means.  I don't think one is better than the other.  It's great that we have options either way.  I can see when I did move to a smaller town, that children and those grown up and who lived in a small town all their lives seemed to have a stronger belief system they held to, less confusion, more of a sense of community.  Schools could be just as effective if not more so because there is less focus on trying to manage a ton of kids and more on educating them.  I went to a huge high school my first two years and learned very little there.  I was bused to an inner city rough area and there was a lot of violence and sometimes the poor teachers had their hands full just dealing with the trouble makers.  Thankfully my parents are very smart (Mom has P.h.D for instance) and influenced and helped me in positive ways.  My second two years I went to an alternative performing arts high school (I was a dancer) and that school was way smaller (graduating class of  61 people) and the classes were tougher.  I had a lot of catching up to do.

 

I was also fortunate to have a father who cultivated a love for wilderness and nature in me.   He brought me to wild places far from the city.  But I didn't truly experience living closer to nature until I moved to a smaller community where outdoor activities are a way of life.  I still marvel at how people up here continue to work and play and jog and bike even when we have blizzards and subzero temps lol.  Ice and snow are just part of life.  In Columbus, the whole city would have shut down with the type of weather we have where I live now.  


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#28 Old 01-20-2014, 12:23 PM
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If a child grows up feeling like there are limited options, that would be more on the parents than the place they live.

 

Not necessarily. There are fewer options for extracurriculars in smaller towns (generally speaking). I grew up in a small to medium sized town. I had an active arts program, a fantastic music program, access to graphic design classes, ballet lessons, gymnastics, several varieties of martial arts, and several gifted pianists who taught. Not to mention metal work, wood work, auto mechanic programs that were an in for vocational training, and sports teams good enough for a few people a year to get significant scholarships. Full French immersion classed K-12. (I'm Canadian). Access to some AP classes to get a head start on university. 

 

My fiance grew up in a tiny town and didn't have access to any of that. I've met the one person that teaches piano there and I could have out played her when I was 12 or so. No band programs or lessons on any other instruments available. No dance classes, no other arts programs, no early vocational training, basically nothing available. His French teacher wasn't actually fluent in the language she was teaching. Not even remotely. No options for going out of town for any of these because the nearest big town was a long ferry ride away. It's a good thing he enjoys the outdoors since that was really the only thing available to do in that town. 

 

By the end of high school I could play three instruments well, several more in a half hearted way. I was a decent painter but it wasn't my heart, same thing for ballet. I was semi-fluent in French, had several AP courses and had taken some fun locally developed classes like psych, and landed a couple of scholarships based upon my extracurriculars. He was really good at hiking. He still hikes occasionally. I play at least one instrument every day and occasionally draw/paint. There were so  many things that he just didn't have access to living where he did.

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#29 Old 01-22-2014, 08:49 PM
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In my other thread I posted a poem by Banjo Patterson, I can quote a section of the poem word for word and I do almost very time I have to go to a city, I have it framed and above my bed:
 
I am sitting in my dingy little office, where a stingy
Ray of sunlight struggles feebly down between the houses tall,
And the foetid air and gritty of the dusty, dirty city
Through the open window floating, spreads its foulness over all

And in place of lowing cattle, I can hear the fiendish rattle
Of the tramways and the 'buses making hurry down the street,
And the language uninviting of the gutter children fighting,
Comes fitfully and faintly through the ceaseless tramp of feet.

And the hurrying people daunt me, and their pallid faces haunt me
As they shoulder one another in their rush and nervous haste,
With their eager eyes and greedy, and their stunted forms and weedy,
For city folk have no time to grow, they have no time to waste.


.

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#30 Old 01-26-2014, 02:52 PM
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Cities are awesome. Forcing people to be close to each other makes the sharing of ideas, innovations (and diseases/problems) easier, quicker and more creative. I love cities.  Cities are the future, the future is going to kill off the suburbs. No more ehhhh I want to drive to the mall but have a yard - too many people and too little space. Building good cities, smart cities, is the key.

 

Whenever I'm over the city I go back and see my family hidden out in the mountains 30 minutes as the crow flies from a gallon of milk. It helps me to bring fresh eyes to the city and my city life/problems. 

 

Growing up in the country was nice. Until I couldn't see a movie, or buy a record, have more than 4 potential dates, or go anywhere where I wasn't immediately bombarded by questions from people I know, or anything a normal teenager wants to do. Then country living is hell on earth. I'm glad my parents acknowledged that and moved me away. 


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