Why i hate Cities. - Page 2 - VeggieBoards
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#31 Old 01-26-2014, 03:39 PM
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Kenickie,

How are you going to feed yourself without the suburbs?

Your post really shows how you know nothing about happiness and the broken system; and how you require external stimulation to feel validated.

Those city people you refer to regarding innovations are the same naive people that wouldn't think twice about polluting a river with toxic waste.

Cities are raping the suburbs and the wild life.
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#32 Old 01-26-2014, 06:08 PM
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Kenickie,

How are you going to feed yourself without the suburbs?

Your post really shows how you know nothing about happiness and the broken system; and how you require external stimulation to feel validated.

Those city people you refer to regarding innovations are the same naive people that wouldn't think twice about polluting a river with toxic waste.

Cities are raping the suburbs and the wild life.

Suburbia does not mean rural. Suburban areas may have backyard or community gardens, rural areas are where the food is most often produced. Suburban sprawl is not environmentally friendly, arguing that is an uphill battle.

Stating that someone does not know happiness is rude and presumptuous, a less rude thing to say would be, "You do not know the happiness of suburban or rural living."

Your sweeping generalizations of city dwellers offends me, and reflects negatively on you.

*added bold
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#33 Old 01-27-2014, 04:50 AM
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In your response to cobalamin you did hit on a few points.

 However in reality, cities do more environmental harm than country areas. suburbs are almost equally damaging.

 But there is something to be said about living on a modest size property where you cant see neighbors, you dont even have need for curtains in the house, can leave the keys in the car if you desire and most mornings you have deer looking at you through your windows.
 It all comes down to what each individual is looking for in their life.
 Personally, I do not like cities, I dont like public transportation, the crowds, the smells, really, Im not into any of it. Yet I understand that there are equally as many that would go totally insane if they were forced to live in a place like I do.
 One thing is for sure, I have never planned any vacation that involved a city, even when I do my cross country trips, I manage to stay out of cities on the drive.
 I like being able to head down on a saturday morning and buy fresh produce that has been grown right in the area I live, not shipped in and stored in a ware house until needed for refilling some store shelf a week from now.
 Each person is different in what they want, I does not reflect poorly on someone if they choose city life or rural.

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#34 Old 01-27-2014, 10:02 AM
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In your response to cobalamin you did hit on a few points.
 However in reality, cities do more environmental harm than country areas. suburbs are almost equally damaging.
 But there is something to be said about living on a modest size property where you cant see neighbors, you dont even have need for curtains in the house, can leave the keys in the car if you desire and most mornings you have deer looking at you through your windows.

 It all comes down to what each individual is looking for in their life.

 Personally, I do not like cities, I dont like public transportation, the crowds, the smells, really, Im not into any of it. Yet I understand that there are equally as many that would go totally insane if they were forced to live in a place like I do.

 One thing is for sure, I have never planned any vacation that involved a city, even when I do my cross country trips, I manage to stay out of cities on the drive.

 I like being able to head down on a saturday morning and buy fresh produce that has been grown right in the area I live, not shipped in and stored in a ware house until needed for refilling some store shelf a week from now.

 Each person is different in what they want, I does not reflect poorly on someone if they choose city life or rural.
Yes, different strokes for different folks.

I like both cities, suburbs, and rural areas, each for their different qualities. I grew up in a suburban type area, visited people in rural areas, and vacationed and lived in big cities.

I like the rural areas for their freedom to do things that can't be done easily in cities. I like the hiking through woods, with the permission of landowners. I like the scenery sometimes, and I like the trusting generosity of the people.

I like the cities for their warehouses of food from all over the world, the giant libraries, the cycle infrastructure, the ability to meet people from diverse backgrounds, and more niche gatherings of people.

There are stereotypes of city folk and country folk that seem to breed negative feelings. No, country folk don't have a culture of incest and overt racism. No, city folk aren't devoid of compassion and community. You have to go out of your way in the city to make friends, it's easy to be lonely in a crowd otherwise.
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#35 Old 01-27-2014, 10:44 AM
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Suburbia does not mean rural. Suburban areas may have backyard or community gardens, rural areas are where the food is most often produced. Suburban sprawl is not environmentally friendly, arguing that is an uphill battle.

Stating that someone does not know happiness is rude and presumptuous, a less rude thing to say would be, "You do not know the happiness of suburban or rural living."

Your sweeping generalizations of city dwellers offends me, and reflects negatively on you.

*added bold

 

Suburbs have the possibility of being environmentally friendly. Backyards are an untapped resource. Imagine if everyone had a different type of nut and fruit tree in their backyard. If everyone planted sunflowers and different varieties of leafy greens in their backyards.

 

I was being frank and anyone who says "Growing up in the country was nice. Until I couldn't see a movie, or buy a record, have more than 4 potential dates" needs some serious look at their poor mental state. There is more to life than external stimulations, aka chasing the highs. -- And don't try to tame me.

 

City dwellers are always in a rush and stressed out. Like too many mice in a cage.

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#36 Old 01-27-2014, 10:58 AM
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Suburbs have the possibility of being environmentally friendly. Backyards are an untapped resource. Imagine if everyone had a different type of nut and fruit tree in their backyard. If everyone planted sunflowers and different varieties of leafy greens in their backyards.

 

I was being frank and anyone who says "Growing up in the country was nice. Until I couldn't see a movie, or buy a record, have more than 4 potential dates" needs some serious look at their poor mental state. There is more to life than external stimulations, aka chasing the highs. -- And don't try to tame me.

 

City dwellers are always in a rush and stressed out. Like too many mice in a cage.


 I agree with proper land use. My 5 acres is wooded, I do nothing to it, If a tree drops, it stays there unless it falls across the small clear area that I do use.

 I have the smallest lot in the area, around me are 100+ acre farms, so I am secluded for the most part.

 however, I would not classify someone that needs or desires the city life as having a poor mental state, (although, I would quickly decline should I be forced into a city) If you think about it, there would be a lower number of possible dating partners in a rural setting than the city, I don't have the constant exposure to every culture under the sun. I can however with a 20 minute drive go to the mall and see a movie, or shop, 15 minutes and I can get to a grocery store or auto parts/farm parts store. Or, I can just sit on my back porch with a cup of coffee and look at woods and never see or hear another person.
 For me its the best of both worlds.
 But I wouldn't refer to city dwellers as mentally ill,,,

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#37 Old 01-27-2014, 11:42 AM
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Suburbs have the possibility of being environmentally friendly. Backyards are an untapped resource. Imagine if everyone had a different type of nut and fruit tree in their backyard. If everyone planted sunflowers and different varieties of leafy greens in their backyards.

I was being frank and anyone who says "Growing up in the country was nice. Until I couldn't see a movie, or buy a record, have more than 4 potential dates" needs some serious look at their poor mental state. There is more to life than external stimulations, aka chasing the highs. -- And don't try to tame me.

City dwellers are always in a rush and stressed out. Like too many mice in a cage.
You have obvious prejudice, and a poor understanding of city living. Kenicke can defend herself, but you are tripping over your tongue. I am pointing out your rudeness, it was your parents job to tame you.
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#38 Old 01-27-2014, 01:00 PM
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You have obvious prejudice, and a poor understanding of city living. Kenicke can defend herself, but you are tripping over your tongue. I am pointing out your rudeness, it was your parents job to tame you.

 

Its impossible that its prejudice since I am living in a city at the present moment and take frequent trips to the suburbs. The experience is night and day. Those living in the suburbs are the most kind and relaxed people I've ever interacted with while those in the city are the most snobbish in a hurry codependent people I've ever met. And of course there is a minority of people in the city that don't fit this description.

 

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

Contro,

 

I didn't say Kenicke or city people are mentally ill. Kenicke's post was very snobbish.

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#39 Old 01-27-2014, 01:17 PM
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---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

Contro,

 

I didn't say Kenicke or city people are mentally ill. Kenicke's post was very snobbish.

 I got ya, I interpreted it wrong.

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#40 Old 01-27-2014, 01:31 PM
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Its impossible that its prejudice since I am living in a city at the present moment and take frequent trips to the suburbs. The experience is night and day. Those living in the suburbs are the most kind and relaxed people I've ever interacted with while those in the city are the most snobbish in a hurry codependent people I've ever met. And of course there is a minority of people in the city that don't fit this description.


Contro,

I didn't say Kenicke or city people are mentally ill. Kenicke's post was very snobbish.
You should collect more anecdotal evidence, because there are just as many 'snobs' in the suburbs as in the city. You aren't exhibiting the kindness of suburbia here well, cobalamin.

Is there a war between the suburbs and city I am unaware of?
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#41 Old 01-27-2014, 01:51 PM
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Is there a war between the suburbs and city I am unaware of?

actually, in some ways there is.

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#42 Old 01-27-2014, 06:18 PM
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if i lived in the city I would miss the stars too, where I live its 30km from the nearest town. so in winter when we have fires outside we just sit and look up at the starts for hours, one of the first thing anybody says when the stay the night at my farm is that there are so many stars! They are beautiful.

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#43 Old 01-28-2014, 04:20 PM
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if i lived in the city I would miss the stars too, where I live its 30km from the nearest town. so in winter when we have fires outside we just sit and look up at the starts for hours, one of the first thing anybody says when the stay the night at my farm is that there are so many stars! They are beautiful.


I do miss the stars.

I like the lights of the city and there's a certain rush, an energy, that just isn't in the country.

But it's not the same as the stars.

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#44 Old 01-28-2014, 04:30 PM
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My cousin lives in a rural area, and I love the sounds of nature and the stars at night. :-) I like *all* the places, I wish I could travel more and see everywhere.

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#45 Old 01-30-2014, 03:55 PM
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I like big cities. To visit. I couldn't live there. Too many freaking people. I really like vegan restaurants on nearly every block, but I dislike literally bumping into people at stores and such. And traffic jams during rush hour. Traffic can get bad here sometimes, but nothing like Chicago or NYC.

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#46 Old 01-31-2014, 08:05 AM
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I couldn't help wondering, where do you people live that is outside the city live?

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#47 Old 01-31-2014, 09:31 AM
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I like big cities. To visit. I couldn't live there. Too many freaking people. I really like vegan restaurants on nearly every block, but I dislike literally bumping into people at stores and such. And traffic jams during rush hour. Traffic can get bad here sometimes, but nothing like Chicago or NYC.
Living in Chicago, I've found that while rush hour traffic is horrible, I never have to face it. Public transportation is a good thing. I take the train, and rarely have issues. And by "rarely", I mean two major delays in my first year, before we suddenly started having issues recently with extreme cold freezing switches on the tracks. Still, less than 10 times in 15 months of having my commute take more than 45 minutes is pretty good, especially since I can sit and read on the train during much of that commuting time, unlike when I used to drive down in Florida.

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#48 Old 01-31-2014, 11:46 AM
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Living in Chicago, I've found that while rush hour traffic is horrible, I never have to face it. Public transportation is a good thing. I take the train, and rarely have issues. And by "rarely", I mean two major delays in my first year, before we suddenly started having issues recently with extreme cold freezing switches on the tracks. Still, less than 10 times in 15 months of having my commute take more than 45 minutes is pretty good, especially since I can sit and read on the train during much of that commuting time, unlike when I used to drive down in Florida.

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Don't you miss driving where people merge unexpectedly without turn signals while texting? You can even get on a bus that will require at least two transfers through the same traffic everyone else is stuck in! The trains are late, but it will follow a CSX train so we will feel the speed at which coal travels. Bicycle? If you're lucky enough to be around a bicycle lane or sidewalk, you have the company of motorists who may or may not recognize your right to live.

Ahhh Florida.
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#49 Old 01-31-2014, 12:35 PM
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I always drove in Florida. I had the same 10-12 minute drive to and from work for over a decade, and at least twice per week, I'd see someone making a right turn from the left lane or a left turn from the right lane of a street that was 3 lanes in either direction. It didn't even surprise me any more.

I love being able to commute by train in Chicago. My only complaint is that the only train lines go from downtown Chicago out to various other places. So if you're on the north side of the city and want to go to the northwest side, you can't just get on a train to go west. You have to go south to downtown and switch to a line going northwest from downtown. If they built rail lines that circled the outer areas of the city and/or nearby suburbs, I might just be tempted to give up the car that I currently only drive maybe 20-30 miles per week.

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#50 Old 01-31-2014, 04:20 PM
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Living in Chicago, I've found that while rush hour traffic is horrible, I never have to face it. Public transportation is a good thing. I take the train, and rarely have issues. And by "rarely", I mean two major delays in my first year, before we suddenly started having issues recently with extreme cold freezing switches on the tracks. Still, less than 10 times in 15 months of having my commute take more than 45 minutes is pretty good, especially since I can sit and read on the train during much of that commuting time, unlike when I used to drive down in Florida.

--Fromper
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I don't like public transportation. I like to go places on my schedule, not the train or bus schedule. Plus I'm guessing no dogs allowed on the train, except service dogs.  I don't even like buses here when riding from where my car is parked to an event, like the fair or even a work meeting like we have to do sometimes. I can't stand being packed like sardines in a can (sorry for the nonvegan comment) amongst people I don't know.

 

I love Chicago. I can get there in 2-1/2 hours or so, have some awesome friends up there, it's incredibly vegan friendly and you'd never run out of fun things to do. But I wouldn't want to live there or any other huge city. I also wouldn't have left Florida to suffer through Midwestern winters, but that's another topic. I hate winter almost as much as I hate being surrounded by so many people. :p

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#51 Old 02-01-2014, 09:41 PM
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I have a feeling this person isn't an American. Not an excuse for not speaking clearly about a rural vs suburban. in this country, where I live especially, suburbs are akin to a disease. They force people to drive farther for work, polluting the environment, killing family time, all so they can have a yard and a privacy fence next to Mr and Mrs So and So who sued the people across the street for building a pond too big for their yard. Suburban sickness is a real thing, and sprawl is one of the worst things about where I live, if not the whole country. The suburbs hate Atlanta so much in this state, that the state government is constantly in a battle to further harm the economic engine of the entire southeastern region to feel some petty victory over us. The suburbs would rather literally choke themselves off from us, with miles of interstate than risk contamination by the poors via transport. This is not hyperbolic language. People were on 285 for 19 hours trying to get 10 miles to get back to their bedroom community this week. I've lived within 15 miles of VBers I'd love to meet (Christy, Tame) for years but haven't because it literally takes 2 hours to get there, and neither of them ever come to the City of Atlanta proper where I live. 

 

and yeah, super rural living is crap for a teenager. Do you not listen to music? Or see movies? Or buy books?  My hometown got DSL two years ago. What would you propose I do, after my 12 year old self was bored of stealing older brothers beer and getting drunk by the river with the eight other people in my peer group?  My high school graduating class (had I staid there) would have been nine. None of them remained in my hometown. I'm one of three who even still resides in the United States. Because it's literally impossible to accept that is the only thing in the world, not even the Amish limit their children like that. Making the choice to live in a rural community - after seeing record stores, and stop lights, and other things is something totally different.

 

i have chickens, 8 beds which produce everything from kale to squash to blueberries, and three fig trees. i live in the heart of atlanta and the sky looks like blade runner every night. it's the ****.


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#52 Old 02-01-2014, 11:06 PM
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I grew up in the country and don't recall being bored. In fact, in my entire life, I've only been bored when I have been in situations where I had to appear as though I was paying attention to something or someone who didn't interest me. I've never been bored when left to my own devices. Imagination, an interest in one's surroundings, thought - there's nothing more needed to avoid boredom.

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#53 Old 02-02-2014, 06:46 AM
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Kenickie,

 

How is the air quality in Atlanta?

 

Do you think you have a consumerist mindset when looking at the world?

 

Are you codependent on your peers?

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#54 Old 02-02-2014, 02:35 PM
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I have a feeling this person isn't an American. Not an excuse for not speaking clearly about a rural vs suburban. in this country, where I live especially, suburbs are akin to a disease. They force people to drive farther for work, polluting the environment, killing family time, all so they can have a yard and a privacy fence next to Mr and Mrs So and So who sued the people across the street for building a pond too big for their yard. Suburban sickness is a real thing, and sprawl is one of the worst things about where I live, if not the whole country. The suburbs hate Atlanta so much in this state, that the state government is constantly in a battle to further harm the economic engine of the entire southeastern region to feel some petty victory over us. The suburbs would rather literally choke themselves off from us, with miles of interstate than risk contamination by the poors via transport. This is not hyperbolic language. People were on 285 for 19 hours trying to get 10 miles to get back to their bedroom community this week. I've lived within 15 miles of VBers I'd love to meet (Christy, Tame) for years but haven't because it literally takes 2 hours to get there, and neither of them ever come to the City of Atlanta proper where I live.

 

and yeah, super rural living is crap for a teenager. Do you not listen to music? Or see movies? Or buy books?  My hometown got DSL two years ago. What would you propose I do, after my 12 year old self was bored of stealing older brothers beer and getting drunk by the river with the eight other people in my peer group?  My high school graduating class (had I staid there) would have been nine. None of them remained in my hometown. I'm one of three who even still resides in the United States. Because it's literally impossible to accept that is the only thing in the world, not even the Amish limit their children like that. Making the choice to live in a rural community - after seeing record stores, and stop lights, and other things is something totally different.

 

i have chickens, 8 beds which produce everything from kale to squash to blueberries, and three fig trees. i live in the heart of atlanta and the sky looks like blade runner every night. it's the ****.

 

Atlanta must be different than other major cities. Even where I am, which is hardly a "major" city, you can't keep chickens and other farm animals. Heck, they try to limit dogs and cats. And you have to go out a ways to have enough land for that much produce. Would be awesome though. All I know of Atlanta is what I see on TV I'll admit, but it looks too dang crowded for me though. Even in my little city which doesn't appear on most maps, I don't go grocery shopping on a weekend afternoon. I tend to go after work at 1:00 or 2:00 a.m. to avoid the crowds.
I wouldn't want to live in a completely rural area either though. Nothing like having to drive 40 minutes for that 1 item you forgot at the store.
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#55 Old 02-02-2014, 03:43 PM
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I couldn't help wondering, where do you people live that is outside the city live?


 The circle is my house, the area inside the white lines is my property, it goes back farther, about half of what is shown. I am between Baltimore and DC just about 20 minutes south of Annapolis, and about 5 minutes from the Chesapeake Bay.

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#56 Old 02-08-2014, 12:36 PM
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Kenickie,

 

How is the air quality in Atlanta?

 

Do you think you have a consumerist mindset when looking at the world?

 

Are you codependent on your peers?

 

Compared to where? 

 

No. I'm an ex starving American refugee. I have a survivalist mentality. Evacuation, eviction, fleeing mentality. Drowning swamp rat in Louisiana and Winter's Bone mountain family in Arkansas. Does that make me more obsessive about things? Sure. Lose (drop) everything you own more than once and the 10 photographs you still have at 24 are more important than the macbook I'm typing this on. Right now, if something terrible happened, I could still carry my whole life on my back. I've lived in this house for 4 years.

 

What peers? The eight people I grew up with? Absolutely not, I could not wait to get away from them. They were all there (as babies) as I emerged from my mom in a tiny house on the ridge. I share a god mother with two of them. I literally know every milestone in these people's lives. Familiarity breeds contempt. I still go back to the mountains once or twice a year, and most of the time it makes my skin crawl. I'm at my mother's less than 10 minutes and the phone starts ringing. Saw Kenickie drive by Harts! How long she in town for!? 

 

I don't hate the country. I was born there and my people are there. I love the springs, the wolves, the rivers. The Old Ways. Love all of that. Seeing my mom is nice, helping winter-fy her cabin is nice. I can do all of that. Doesn't mean I want it.

 

I lived alone, no phone, no internet, no television, no car, completely isolated in a cabin on the ridge for the winter a couple years ago, but it wasn't really by choice - I was too damaged to handle being seen or touched by anyone or anything. I didn't really play any music, read, do anything. I saw my Aunt once every week to 10 days, got groceries with her, and then she would drop me off at the line until next time. Basically just stared at the river, wrote, chopped wood, painted the trees along the line purple, took care of the cat. I would never choose that, though, in a long term way. One, it was dangerous and foolish of me to be so isolated and so alone during a winter thats known for ice storms and other terrible things (I literally could have died) but also I didn't like what it was doing to me. Who I was becoming. Had I spent longer than those three months there, I don't know what kind of person would have come out. I'm not fit to be a pilgrim at tinker creek. Or, damaged daughter on wolf ridge, as it were. 

 

Not everyone can live in the country, and surely not everyone wants to. The future just doesn't have room for that. The future doesn't even have room for suburbs. Otherwise where does all the food for these people come from? Compact, walkable, livable cities are important to promote and develop. Otherwise, ****'s ****ed. I have no problem with city people thinking I'm some sort of bumpkin born on a road that's just numbers. and I have no problem with country people thinking I'm some sort of city slicker who's sold out the old ways and doesn't know how to survive with nothing any more. They are both wrong, and " why i hate cities" just sounds sooooooo dumb and elitist and privileged and self promoting. It's bad and good, just like everything else. Get over it.


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#57 Old 02-08-2014, 12:54 PM
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 " why i hate cities" just sounds sooooooo dumb and elitist and privileged and self promoting. 

 

 

totally forgot this was VB for a second.


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#58 Old 02-08-2014, 12:59 PM
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totally forgot this was VB for a second.
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#59 Old 02-08-2014, 01:04 PM
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I'm with you all the way. The ultimate "NO" is New York City. I keep hearing NYC is the ultimate place to live. It has EVERYTHING. Not for me. I can't even stand to drive through the place on my way to somewhere else. wink3.gif

No offense to anyone who likes such things but give me land and good health to be able to raise healthful food on it and I'm happy. You can keep all that other stuff. I could almost see wanting to be "near" some amount of shopping back before the internet, but these days you can have anything you need delivered right to your door.

Country is best. Suburbs can be okay. But cities, no thank you.

Ken
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ilikekale is offline  
#60 Old 02-08-2014, 02:17 PM
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Originally Posted by Beautiful Joe View Post
 

I grew up in the country and don't recall being bored. In fact, in my entire life, I've only been bored when I have been in situations where I had to appear as though I was paying attention to something or someone who didn't interest me. I've never been bored when left to my own devices. Imagination, an interest in one's surroundings, thought - there's nothing more needed to avoid boredom.

 

Exactly! I never get bored when i'm on my own. Only simple minds get bored.

 

As for kenickie question about “Do you not listen to music? Or see movies? Or buy books?” of course I do. I can get any music, movie or book I want, it’s called online shopping and mail order! Sometimes its here within two days. Just last months I bought a Richard Wagner box set, a book about eating Raw and a few DVD’s. and last year we got our freezer sent to us by freight which cost us bugger all. And all my organic Heirloom vegetable seeds come via the mail as well. Country living can be great but I know it’s not for everyone, some people just can't cope with living in the country, and some people (like me) can’t cope with living in a residential area, and some people like both. i stand by my statement, i hate the city and the country fits me like a glove.

 

to Quote a favourite book of mine:

  "The city is anti-agriculture; is built on arable land, and trees are uprooted for its construction. It tempts peasants to leave the land and become lazy beggars on its sidewalks. At the same time, the city devours agricultural production and demands more and more of it, although this agricultural production requires land and peasants from outside the city."

 

EDIT: just realised that @ILIKEKALE just mentioned getting things via mail, nice to know we are on the same wavelength. :)

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