'Withdraw your money out of your bank day' December 7th - Page 2 - VeggieBoards
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#31 Old 11-23-2010, 09:28 AM
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just curious how would explain that to shareholders? that you're tired of making money? i'm sure they would be happy to retire you.

If there were a law change, then no explanation would be needed. That's what happened with my insurance this year. There were a few good changes because of Obama's health care plan. In their presentation to us last week (they do this every year), they made a big deal out of the new benefits (and almost made it sound like they were doing it out of their own kindness). They obviously don't like being forced to cover pre-existing conditions that they didn't before or covering kids until they are 26 years old. But they ran with it like it's a good thing.

There's always at least two ways of looking at things. There's the "gloom and doom" and then there's "everybody wins".
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#32 Old 11-23-2010, 02:44 PM
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Wachovia is still separate from Wells Fargo for the time being.

No it's not. They have completely merged and now operate under a single bank charter.

http://blog.wellsfargo.com/wachovia/...d_continu.html

Any difference in branding is purely cosmetic, just like you can buy a Craftsman branded tool at Sears, but it's still Sears. Within the next year or so, the plan is for the Wachovia brand to disappear and be completely replaced by Wells Fargo.

http://blog.wellsfargo.com/wachovia/...-branding.html
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#33 Old 11-23-2010, 03:00 PM
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I know what you are saying. But that's like saying a Buick is a Chevrolet. They may be owned by the same company, but they are not quite the same.

Technically, yes they are one company because Wells Fargo owns them. However, my bank still says Wachovia on the building and my account number has not changed (from what I understand I will be issued a Well Fargo account number someday). So, for all intents and purposes, they are still separate because they are not fully integrated into one entity. They are just eager to claim they are fully integrated so they can climb up higher on the top 10 list of biggest banks in America.
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#34 Old 11-23-2010, 07:14 PM
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I know what you are saying. But that's like saying a Buick is a Chevrolet. They may be owned by the same company, but they are not quite the same.

Technically, yes they are one company because Wells Fargo owns them. However, my bank still says Wachovia on the building and my account number has not changed (from what I understand I will be issued a Well Fargo account number someday). So, for all intents and purposes, they are still separate because they are not fully integrated into one entity. They are just eager to claim they are fully integrated so they can climb up higher on the top 10 list of biggest banks in America.

But they are only one single bank now, they aren't one bank owned by another. Two banks can't operate under the same charter. It just takes time to change the signs on the buildings and letterheads. They're just doing it slowly, state by state.
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#35 Old 11-23-2010, 08:59 PM
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It'd be embarrassing to withdraw my last $1.46. >_>

"A-yup. Ya wasted yer life, son"

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#36 Old 11-24-2010, 01:40 AM
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I wonder how many people are going to withdraw all their funds, and then some autocharge will go through and put them in hell with overdrafts or payment denials (which cost a $35 fee plus the additional fee coming from whoever charged the account). Banks may do well to advance this cause among the poor.
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#37 Old 11-24-2010, 05:49 AM
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I'm still looking for a decent credit union that actually does online banking without whalloping me with huge fees. Haven't found one yet so I am still with Bank of America.
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#38 Old 12-12-2010, 05:40 AM
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Whatever happened with this thing?
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#39 Old 12-12-2010, 07:25 AM
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Whatever happened with this thing?

The banking industry nearly collapsed as a result of this protest. Banks are now subservient to its customers. Now there are no more overdraft fees, very low interest rates, lots of freebies and excellent customer service. The people won the war!

This strategy worked just as well as that time when everyone would not buy gas for a day. We won that time, too. Gas stations immediately lowered prices.

Works every time.
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#40 Old 12-12-2010, 08:12 AM
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Whatever happened with this thing?

Not much! It looks like a number of people used this as an excuse to move funds from commercial banks to co-op banks or similar. http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2010...t-banks-france But one must note that banks rarely tell the press what is actually going on in their banks so even if a small bank run was made no mainstream band would admit it.

However, judging by the worried reporting of a few financial newspapers about this concept. it is enough to think it still has legs. This was just one ex-footballer talking to one reporter about a small movement he had heard about. This got picked up and carried to many European newspapers. Quite a few people heard about it in only the few weeks it was organised. If a well organised concerted effort could be made with enough lead time and groundswell support it could seriously have the desired impact.

I just like the concept that if you are one of the people who are upset at what the big mainstream banks have done to this economy and you have an account with one of those banks then you are part of of the problem. We as banking customers have the power to change things significantly if we choose to (well not me any more as I've moved all of my funds to a co-op account).
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#41 Old 12-12-2010, 11:34 AM
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Originally Posted by sleepydvdr View Post

The banking industry nearly collapsed as a result of this protest. Banks are now subservient to its customers. Now there are no more overdraft fees, very low interest rates, lots of freebies and excellent customer service. The people won the war!

This strategy worked just as well as that time when everyone would not buy gas for a day. We won that time, too. Gas stations immediately lowered prices.

Works every time.


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#42 Old 12-12-2010, 11:36 AM
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This was just one ex-footballer talking to one reporter about a small movement he had heard about.


That's all I saw when I googled it today. There was nothing new.
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#43 Old 12-12-2010, 04:51 PM
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what's the viable alternative to the current banking system? if i don't like the way bank A treats me, i go to bank B. that you can do this keeps the banking business competitive.

of course, this is a do nothing movement that won't amount to anything because people need banking services. the system works wonderfully well for me. i don't overdraw my accounts, i buy everything with credit cards, and i pay them and the rest of my bills online.

blaming all the ills of the financial meltdown on the banks isn't realistic.
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#44 Old 12-13-2010, 02:43 AM
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I learned on an episode of Martha Stewart you can thicken a regular homemade gasoline molotov into a more festive and lethal napalm molotov by adding either ordinary styrofoam or oatmeal until the gasoline reaches the desired consistency.

Vaseline also works very well, and makes it very difficult to remove from the skin

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#45 Old 12-13-2010, 07:09 AM
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That's all I saw when I googled it today. There was nothing new.

Social movements never work the first time out. But perhaps this is a seed of an idea that has been planted and may reap rewards in the coming years?
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#46 Old 12-13-2010, 07:15 AM
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what's the viable alternative to the current banking system? if i don't like the way bank A treats me, i go to bank B. that you can do this keeps the banking business competitive.

of course, this is a do nothing movement that won't amount to anything because people need banking services. the system works wonderfully well for me. i don't overdraw my accounts, i buy everything with credit cards, and i pay them and the rest of my bills online.

blaming all the ills of the financial meltdown on the banks isn't realistic.

The banking industry caused the financial meltdown by knowingly creating toxic debt that was repackaged and sold on to other financial institutions. The individuals within the under-regulated banking industry made millions doing this and are now financially independent while homes are being foreclosed on. Also, right now in the financial industry workers are getting billions of dollars in bonuses while food banks struggle to find food to feed their growing customers.

So, yes. By and large the global economic meltdown was indeed caused by the mainstream banking institutions.

You can still have banking services from a local building society or co-operative bank or credit union. These institution's invest in their locality and do not give their staff million dollar bonuses. Don't they deserve your custom more than Citibank or the like?
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