The 10 Most Worthless College Majors - Page 2 - VeggieBoards
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#31 Old 06-05-2008, 06:10 PM
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The author is writing about how useless a major to set you up to make money in your career.



That's not what university or college is about- Trade, Techical and professional schools are about that.



I have a degree in Sociocultural Anthropology, which is a social science. I wouldn't trade it for the world. I learned so much about the world and the people in it- but also how to learn, disseminate information, research, critique and elaborate on other's ideas and create my own, time management, and so many other useful skills.



My degree has helped me tremendously in my field, which operations management in the arts/service industry.



You get what you take from the degree.

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#32 Old 06-05-2008, 06:23 PM
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Wow.



My list, for bachelor's degrees, would be completely different (except for 1). In no particular order:



1. Psychology

2. American Studies

3. Anthropology (though I do adore you, Synergy)

4. General Studies

5. Pre-med

6. Pre-law

7. Sociology

8. Political Science

9. Any language focus

10. "Humanities" (I think some schools still offer this)



I'll also add that any online degree is worthless, much like those you could purchase out of the back of "Rolling Stone" magazine when I was in my salad days....
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#33 Old 06-05-2008, 11:05 PM
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i know many people who have those majors who have high paying jobs in a variety of fields. some of them are even professionals in those fields--such as professional dancers, professional film makers, etc.
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#34 Old 06-06-2008, 12:25 AM
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My father was a psychologist, though he was a PhD.
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#35 Old 06-06-2008, 03:12 AM
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Originally Posted by bigdufstuff View Post

This article is the typical wrong thinking that the only thing gained from college is job training. School is about learning, expanding your experiences, and understanding culture. If you go to college simply to get a job then you're missing out on a lot.



Once again, I agree that a lot about 'going to college' has to so with gaining personal life experiences, etc. ((though I think I could have gone through life without all the 'special experiences' I went through in college..but that's besides the point..)), but frankly.....$20 grand+ (that's on the lower end) per semester for a piece of paper that may or may not get you a better job ((esp. in this current economic environment, where its all about getting the most bucks, understandably!)) is a tad pit pricey for most.



But if you or your parents have the means to get you a super life-experience and understanding of your culture, as well as a B.A. in Women's Studies, the more to you-! I'd have to say I'd be a bit jealous!

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#36 Old 06-06-2008, 06:38 AM
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Also, is there really anything wrong with "flipping burgers" or equivalent jobs? I'm sure there are those in these jobs that are happy enough, not everyone needs or wants to be a professional regardless of their qualifications or intelligence
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#37 Old 06-06-2008, 06:50 AM
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Originally Posted by thalestral View Post

Also, is there really anything wrong with "flipping burgers" or equivalent jobs? I'm sure there are those in these jobs that are happy enough, not everyone needs or wants to be a professional regardless of their qualifications or intelligence



I think for the most part, people who have perused a college or university education at least aspire to a career that doesn't involve 'flipping burgers' or being a sandwich artist. Those jobs do have their challenges and rewards, but don't require post secondary training. If someone was satisfied to have a job like that as their career, I think they wouldn't bother investing thousands of dollars in education.

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#38 Old 06-06-2008, 07:56 AM
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Originally Posted by sarahjayn1980 View Post

Why the quotation marks? It's a real area of concentration. It's what my degree is in.



No offense - it was all meant in fun. I've picked on the degree in the past simply because I think the name sounds funny. Kindof like saying you have a degree in "school."



I thought you got your degree in education?
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#39 Old 06-06-2008, 11:43 AM
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I think for the most part, people who have perused a college or university education at least aspire to a career that doesn't involve 'flipping burgers' or being a sandwich artist. Those jobs do have their challenges and rewards, but don't require post secondary training. If someone was satisfied to have a job like that as their career, I think they wouldn't bother investing thousands of dollars in education.



True, I think it's perhaps a cultural difference as well. Here in the UK the thousands of pounds are a debt rather than paid at the time, and anyone and everyone is encouraged to go to university rather than thinking about whether that's what they really want to do. It's an expectation rather than a choice for many I'd go so far as to say.



I met many people at university unhappy to be there which I never really expected, and equally unhappy at the prospect of seeming a "failure" afterwards if they went to a job that just made them happy (the stigma of dropping out is also very strong :/).



On top of that though, if someone has the determination to work their way through further education in something that interests them without wanting to then work as a professional or high earning person then that is fine too, and I don't think it's any reflection on them or their chosen course of study
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#40 Old 06-06-2008, 01:03 PM
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Originally Posted by synergy View Post

I think for the most part, people who have perused a college or university education at least aspire to a career that doesn't involve 'flipping burgers' or being a sandwich artist. Those jobs do have their challenges and rewards, but don't require post secondary training. If someone was satisfied to have a job like that as their career, I think they wouldn't bother investing thousands of dollars in education.



I don't know. I struggled to get through college because I had to pay for the whole thing myself. I was going to go into politics and/or government service but after an endless stream of rejection letters I ended up as a manager of a shoe store. All of that debt and stuggle so I could be Al Bundy!



Needless to say, I had some years of bitterness and anger.



Then I began to hear from other people my age (I'm 44) who got "real" jobs. They sounded pretty miseralbe living their lives in a corporate Dunder Mifflin and answering to a Michael Scott person all day long.



I think that ending up satisfied in a job requires knowing who you are and what really makes you happy. I found that I'm happy in a low stress job in a warehouse that gives me more time to take care of a large garden and walk in the woods.



I still enjoy the fruits of a college education. I seem to be one of the few people in my area able to see through George Dubya Bush and his cast of miscreants and the religious blather that infects the southern U.S.



To be free of that was worth the money.
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#41 Old 06-06-2008, 01:31 PM
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I don't know. I struggled to get through college because I had to pay for the whole thing myself. I was going to go into politics and/or government service but after an endless stream of rejection letters I ended up as a manager of a shoe store. All of that debt and stuggle so I could be Al Bundy!



Needless to say, I had some years of bitterness and anger.



Then I began to hear from other people my age (I'm 44) who got "real" jobs. They sounded pretty miseralbe living their lives in a corporate Dunder Mifflin and answering to a Michael Scott person all day long.



I think that ending up satisfied in a job requires knowing who you are and what really makes you happy. I found that I'm happy in a low stress job in a warehouse that gives me more time to take care of a large garden and walk in the woods.



This part of your post reminded me of the book How Starbucks Saved My Life

by Michael Gates Gill
. I haven't read it, but I've heard him interviewed and it seems he feels very much like you do.
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#42 Old 06-06-2008, 01:39 PM
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Back when I was in college my one friend was a philosophy major (I a psychology one) -- a pretty big argument between the groups always happened ---- both thought of the other as a wasted degree (one thought you should prove what you believe, the other thought you should act on what you believe -- oversimplified, but the gist).



Ironically.... both were right and wrong overall. Both degrees are probably the most useful ones on the planet. Everyone uses them everyday.



But yeah.... as long as someone does what makes them happy, and they can hopefully survive doing it -- that's all that really matters in the world.
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#43 Old 06-06-2008, 01:47 PM
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where's "liberal arts"?

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#44 Old 06-06-2008, 08:54 PM
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This part of your post reminded me of the book How Starbucks Saved My Life

by Michael Gates Gill
. I haven't read it, but I've heard him interviewed and it seems he feels very much like you do.



I saw him interviewed on CBS Sunday Morning. In a society that measures success by titles and the amount of stuff you have, it's nice to see a person who has been able to rise above it.
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#45 Old 06-07-2008, 12:29 PM
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I originally was an Electronic Engineering major at a state school.

Changed to a BA/BS 5year program at a private college: Physics/Math(BA) Engineering(BS).

From there I switched to Philosophy-Religion / English-Writing double major,

and then to English-Writing (major) / Film & Art (double minor).



I am now a English-Writing major, and debating between Philosophy,Theology, & Film as a minor.



Is a career really most important in life?

The Apostle Paul was a tent maker; St. Peter was a fisherman; Einstein worked at a patent office; Dostoevsky dropped out of Engineering Academy to be arrested and exiled and then wrote to pay off gambling debts. They have probably impacted more lives still to this day than most of the princes of the earth.



We are not our vocation.



. . . although, I would say, this does not mean that greatness is attributed to those who sleep away their lives in mediocrity, only that greatness isn't judged by dollar signs. Surely the single woman who works 3 jobs to feed her children and goes to technical school at night is greater than the son of a millionaire who graduates Yale at the top of his class with ease.
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#46 Old 06-07-2008, 05:56 PM
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I started with #4, moved on to #3, and ended up with #2, with a brief stint in #9. Almost got half the list on my transcript.



Obviously, most people in these majors aren't taking them necessarily for the high paying salaries and great job prospects.



My only regret is not taking more of those classes.
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#47 Old 06-07-2008, 08:02 PM
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9. Any language focus



I don't get this?
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#48 Old 06-07-2008, 08:24 PM
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I don't get this?



For example, getting a degree in "German." It may take 4 years or more to learn a language, but to make it a baccalaureate focus seems a bit much. One would be better off studying what it is they like about Germans in the first place, and pick up the language along the way.
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#49 Old 06-07-2008, 08:25 PM
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where's "liberal arts"?



I'm with you there, sister. That falls within the "Humanities" realm.
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#50 Old 06-08-2008, 12:09 AM
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I know so many philosophy majors, and the OP got it right on.



Pot and books and going nowhere in life<3
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#51 Old 06-08-2008, 12:14 AM
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^ ^

..but you get so much EXPERIENCE!!!



....



to backtrack....



Quote:
Originally Posted by Iria View Post

But you need a higher degree in the sciences too if you ever want to rise above being a lab assistant, right?



I could most likely snag an entry-level job at some pharma firm and work my way up, or so I've been told my my professors ((but what do they know? )).



And my area ((Boston, MA)) is a hot spot for drug/medical technology development..so I like to tell people I'll be making a million bucks with my B.S. in Bio....when I finally get it.......

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#52 Old 06-08-2008, 12:19 AM
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^ ^

..but you get so much EXPERIENCE!!!



*cough* But how much of it is lucid? *cough*
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#53 Old 06-08-2008, 01:22 AM
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I only glanced at the article, but it looks like it was written by an idiot....



LOL well said I can't agree with you more
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#54 Old 06-08-2008, 05:45 AM
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Originally Posted by abroadinSacto View Post

For example, getting a degree in "German." It may take 4 years or more to learn a language, but to make it a baccalaureate focus seems a bit much. One would be better off studying what it is they like about Germans in the first place, and pick up the language along the way.





Any language major will involve many cultural classes, and often study-abroad components as well. Translation/interpretation schools consider candidates who have had at LEAST four years of formal instruction in their language. If a person wants to go into translation/interpretation/ESL teaching, then it is extremely beneficial to major in their target language. "I listened to a lot of Rammstein" or even "I lived in Germany for a couple of years" is not going to cut it for a school which is going to train an interpreter. Interpretation and translation jobs are very demanding and require skills and knowledge beyond what you would usually get from picking a language up through non-instructional exposure.
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#55 Old 06-08-2008, 06:11 AM
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I have a black belt in macrame.



Dang! I only have a brown belt.

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#56 Old 06-08-2008, 06:40 AM
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My chemistry teacher had a PHD in chocolate. apparantly it is a very complicated and difficult subject... It led to a job in the cadburys factory which she could have got with no degree at all. So she went back to university and did teaching instead.
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#57 Old 06-08-2008, 09:17 AM
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Any language major will involve many cultural classes, and often study-abroad components as well.

This skirts around one of the points I was trying to make. If you study the culture or the country, you can/must study the language on the side.



Quote:
Translation/interpretation schools consider candidates who have had at LEAST four years of formal instruction in their language. If a person wants to go into translation/interpretation/ESL teaching, then it is extremely beneficial to major in their target language. "I listened to a lot of Rammstein" or even "I lived in Germany for a couple of years" is not going to cut it for a school which is going to train an interpreter. Interpretation and translation jobs are very demanding and require skills and knowledge beyond what you would usually get from picking a language up through non-instructional exposure.



Where I've lived schools are actually more interested in education degrees than your actual abilities, but yeah, any job in education generally requires specific degrees.
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#58 Old 06-08-2008, 02:07 PM
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Originally Posted by sarahjayn1980 View Post

Eh. It just sounds like you are really closed-minded about accepting the possibility that there can be depths of study that are as significant in fields other than your own or ones in which you are interested / that you excell.



In the case of German language, some people study the language in-depth - - including the historical changes in the language and nuances therein. We couldn't translate ancient texts without these people having a personal relationship that comes from in-depth study. So, even though its not my cup of tea, I don't judge their major as lesser or useless.



Maybe I should stress again that I'm talking about study at the bachelor's level. And also that, for the most part, I'm just being silly (I have a degree in anthropology).





Unrelated, I'll follow up that I like troub's attitude. Your degrees and vocation shouldn't define who you are. If they do, you need to get a real life.
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#59 Old 06-08-2008, 02:13 PM
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really?



Yes, unless you are talking about macrame classes or paranoid agenda schools that get around the requirements by hiring one licenced teacher and a bunch of "helpers."
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#60 Old 06-08-2008, 09:48 PM
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Originally Posted by sarahjayn1980 View Post

I was talking about the bachelor level, too. I went to a college, though, where your education was what you put into it. So, maybe I experienced people who put more in than your average bachelor student. I don't know, though, because I have no frame of reference. I only went to the one college.



As a side note, I can see (sort of) what Troub is saying. However, I don't see being devoted to your calling (mine, for example, as a teacher) as a short-coming on my part. For some people it's not just 9 - 5. It's a life commitment. My vocation as an educator does define me largely. There are a lot of other lovely (and some not so lovely) bits about me, but that's a big part of me. To each his or her own, you know?



As another side note, I keep hearing a lot of judgement from you. These majors are inferior, people who do this or that need a life, if you don't meet my requirements for a field in which I don't specialize in you're obviously teaching fluff or in some off situation . . . etc, etc. Are you really this close-minded?



I think you're reading a bit much into my posts.



If your interest in education helps define you, that's great. It's admirable. That's a focus of your life. If you walked around saying, "I have a degree in blahblah," or, "I teach fifth grade" and expected people to be impressed or are impressed yourself, then you're running short. I'm not saying that you are doing so: I know very little about you.



So far as your statement, "your education was what you put into it," I couldn't agree more heartily.



Also, though I have taught in the past, I don't think I ever taught "fluff." I wish I had. It sounds a bit risque...
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