Morbid New Law - VeggieBoards
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#1 Old 04-13-2016, 05:53 PM
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Morbid New Law

So I'm usually pretty proud to be in Washington state, but then I read this.

http://1027kord.com/new-washington-s...it-you-eat-it/

So...not sure what to think about it. A few of my omnivore friends commented about "why waste the meat?" and other similarly morbid things, but...what's the thought on this? I wouldn't do it (even though I grew up eating venison and elk, native american heritage and all that) but the argument was made that at that point I wouldn't be very vegan for not using what was given to me by accident or otherwise. Omnivorous bs....

Thoughts?

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#2 Old 04-13-2016, 06:03 PM
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I'm pretty sure that's how Ohios law is worded. You need to get it tagged or inspected or something, but you are allowed to take it for consumption.


Can I pick up wild animals kill along the road?
Deer: Road-killed deer may only be possessed by receipt or permit. If you pick up a deer, you can contact your local wildlife officer, the sheriff's office or the state patrol for a receipt.
Hawks, owls, songbirds: These birds may not be collected except by accredited scientific and educational institutions with valid state and federal permits.
Raccoons, skunks, opossums, squirrels, pheasants and other game animals: These may only be possessed during legal hunting season, and a hunting license is required to possess them.
Turkeys: Contact your local wildlife officer to obtain a receipt after collection.
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#3 Old 04-13-2016, 06:07 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by silva View Post
I'm pretty sure that's how Ohios law is worded. You need to get it tagged or inspected or something, but you are allowed to take it for consumption.


Can I pick up wild animals kill along the road?
Deer: Road-killed deer may only be possessed by receipt or permit. If you pick up a deer, you can contact your local wildlife officer, the sheriff's office or the state patrol for a receipt.
Hawks, owls, songbirds: These birds may not be collected except by accredited scientific and educational institutions with valid state and federal permits.
Raccoons, skunks, opossums, squirrels, pheasants and other game animals: These may only be possessed during legal hunting season, and a hunting license is required to possess them.
Turkeys: Contact your local wildlife officer to obtain a receipt after collection.
I was also curious what you guys thought about my omnivorous friends making those stupid comments about wastefulness. As though just because an animal died I'm now obligated to eat it because the law says I can. -.-;;
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#4 Old 04-13-2016, 06:24 PM
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I didn't want to read the comments!
Other animals eat roadkill, no I don't feel people should. I did know a guy who spent a week at his hunting cabin without killing any deer. On his way driving back he hit one and his truck got pretty damaged. He did take it, quite ironic...
So much is from over development and high speeds on country roads. I live in an older city and their are many deer, yet I haven't seen any killed. The speeds are reduced, the people aware and have better sights, and the animals seem to have developed street smarts. In the suburb I moved from it was terrible.
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#5 Old 04-13-2016, 06:27 PM
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Originally Posted by Aliakai View Post
I was also curious what you guys thought about my omnivorous friends making those stupid comments about wastefulness. As though just because an animal died I'm now obligated to eat it because the law says I can. -.-;;
I guarantee you roadkill will not go to waste if it is left by the side of the road. Many animals in the wild rely on roadkill for survival. I once saw about twenty crows eating a deer carcass on the side of a highway. Fox, wolves, coyotes, eagles, crows, hawks, insects, and various other animals all partake in roadkill. Good grief, omnivores already have grocery stores packed to capacity with dead meat available to them. No one whines about the amount of restaurant and grocery meat that will go to waste at the end of a day due to spoilage, surplus, etc. Why the need to take roadkill too?

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#6 Old 04-13-2016, 07:43 PM
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I agree with the law. If you run over a person, you should have to eat their corpse.
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#7 Old 04-14-2016, 09:35 AM
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If someone accidentally hits and kills a deer on their way to hunting deer, I would much prefer that they take that deer and eat her rather than shooting another one.

As to idiots who say that you have a moral obligation, as a veg*n, to eat animals killed on roadways, tell them that you will consider it once they start to consistently take home and eat any dead cats, dogs, raccoons, opossums, etc. they see on or along the road.

As for waste - as others have pointed out, corpses do not go to waste in nature.
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#8 Old 04-14-2016, 10:01 AM
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If ever there was an argument for "ethically sourced" meat, roadkill would be it. Accidents do happen, and even the most hardcore vegan could accidentally hit an animal while driving. Though I do feel it should be left for nature to take care of, as many other animals would benefit far more than a human from scavenging off a carcass. Then again, Joe brings up a good point that I'd rather someone eat a deer which was accidentally killed by a car then go hunt one or buy meat with was deliberately killed.

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#9 Old 04-14-2016, 10:04 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by silva View Post
I'm pretty sure that's how Ohios law is worded. You need to get it tagged or inspected or something, but you are allowed to take it for consumption.


Can I pick up wild animals kill along the road?
Deer: Road-killed deer may only be possessed by receipt or permit. If you pick up a deer, you can contact your local wildlife officer, the sheriff's office or the state patrol for a receipt.
Hawks, owls, songbirds: These birds may not be collected except by accredited scientific and educational institutions with valid state and federal permits.
Raccoons, skunks, opossums, squirrels, pheasants and other game animals: These may only be possessed during legal hunting season, and a hunting license is required to possess them.
Turkeys: Contact your local wildlife officer to obtain a receipt after collection.
People actually hunt opossums, raccoons and skunks to eat? And how much meat would they possibly get off a squirrel? Omni's perplex me.
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#10 Old 04-14-2016, 10:54 AM
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@kiwibird08 Raccoons, opossums, squirrels and the like are hunted more for their pelts than for their meat, although some people do eat them.
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#11 Old 04-14-2016, 11:54 AM
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Originally Posted by Kiwibird08 View Post
People actually hunt opossums, raccoons and skunks to eat? And how much meat would they possibly get off a squirrel? Omni's perplex me.

Back in the rural boondocks, some people eat these. When my dad was growing up in the 40s and 50s, his Kansas stepmom used to serve up this kind of stuff. Her house also had bars on the basement windows (left over from the days of enslaved agricultural workers).
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_________

Specific recommendations for a healthy diet include: eating more fruit, vegetables, legumes, nuts and grains; cutting down on salt, sugar and fats. It is also advisable to choose unsaturated fats, instead of saturated fats and towards the elimination of trans-fatty acids."
- United Nations' World Health Organization
http://www.who.int/topics/diet/en/
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#12 Old 04-14-2016, 12:25 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kiwibird08 View Post
People actually hunt opossums, raccoons and skunks to eat? And how much meat would they possibly get off a squirrel? Omni's perplex me.
The only one of those animals that I've never heard of being killed for food is skunks.

People also regularly kill and eat doves and even smaller birds, sad to say.





If it won't upset you too much, google "squirrel recipe", "opossum recipe", etc. Eating these animals is not a thing of the past by any means.
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Last edited by Beautiful Joe; 04-14-2016 at 12:29 PM.
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#13 Old 04-14-2016, 12:31 PM
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Mourning doves are the traditional bird of peace and a beloved backyard songbird. But some people use mourning doves as live targets, sometimes calling them "cheap skeet." Hunters kill more doves each year—more than 20 million—than any other animal in the country.
http://www.humanesociety.org/issues/...ww.google.com/
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#14 Old 04-14-2016, 05:20 PM
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Uh, the Bible advises against this in the Old Testament, because food poisoning, and that's also probably the reason they put "at your own risk" in the law.

Potentially road kill can be food for wildlife, or fertilizer for the plants, so I'm not especially gung go about this as an environmentalist, any vegetarian ethics aside...honestly if you're out in the wilderness salvaging or very poor, ok, but otherwise it just seems greedy and stupid.
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#15 Old 04-14-2016, 05:24 PM
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Originally Posted by David3 View Post
Back in the rural boondocks, some people eat these. When my dad was growing up in the 40s and 50s, his Kansas stepmom used to serve up this kind of stuff. Her house also had bars on the basement windows (left over from the days of enslaved agricultural workers).
Yes but at that time it may have been a matter of economy or survival rather than being a gourmand.

This is something passed down from subsistence farmers in pioneer days so it once actually had relevance to people who were for all intents and purposes living off the land, who only grew what they needed or traded, so could be lacto-ovo for days or weeks on end until they caught a raccoon or finally slaughtered the winter pig.
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#16 Old 04-14-2016, 07:20 PM
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Yes but at that time it may have been a matter of economy or survival rather than being a gourmand.

This is something passed down from subsistence farmers in pioneer days so it once actually had relevance to people who were for all intents and purposes living off the land, who only grew what they needed or traded, so could be lacto-ovo for days or weeks on end until they caught a raccoon or finally slaughtered the winter pig.
Agree 100%. And you are correct - it definitely wasn't a gourmand! My dad did not enjoy when his stepmom served it.
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_________

Specific recommendations for a healthy diet include: eating more fruit, vegetables, legumes, nuts and grains; cutting down on salt, sugar and fats. It is also advisable to choose unsaturated fats, instead of saturated fats and towards the elimination of trans-fatty acids."
- United Nations' World Health Organization
http://www.who.int/topics/diet/en/
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#17 Old 04-15-2016, 01:35 AM
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Originally Posted by silva View Post
I'm pretty sure that's how Ohios law is worded. You need to get it tagged or inspected or something, but you are allowed to take it for consumption.


Can I pick up wild animals kill along the road?
Deer: Road-killed deer may only be possessed by receipt or permit. If you pick up a deer, you can contact your local wildlife officer, the sheriff's office or the state patrol for a receipt.
Hawks, owls, songbirds: These birds may not be collected except by accredited scientific and educational institutions with valid state and federal permits.
Raccoons, skunks, opossums, squirrels, pheasants and other game animals: These may only be possessed during legal hunting season, and a hunting license is required to possess them.
Turkeys: Contact your local wildlife officer to obtain a receipt after collection.
You make an excellent point that I think is missed. There are laws about possession of wild animal carcasses. Also, these carcasses must be handled with care because of the risk of disease and food poisoning. There is also a LOT of work that goes into processing a wild animal carcass in order to eat it or use it's parts. How many people are going to actually do all that or pay someone to do that because they see an animal dead on the road? unless a person has the tools already, it would be cheaper to actually eat at a restaurant or buy meat from a grocery store.

I also don't buy that someone running over a dead animal and taking it for food would prevent them from hunting, since hunting is done often not for necessity but for sport. in fact, there are quite a few idiots that probably enjoy running down animals (at least the smaller ones that won't damage their cars).

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#18 Old 04-22-2016, 12:36 PM
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You asked me for my thought and here it is.
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