Ounces or fluid ounces? - VeggieBoards
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#1 Old 11-22-2010, 06:48 AM
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An American recipe calls for a 28 ounce can of crushed tomatoes. Is that 28 ounces of weight or 28 fluid ounces of dimension?

This ****ing US customary system makes me so maaaaaaad.

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#2 Old 11-22-2010, 06:53 AM
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I would think weight. I don't recall seeing "fl oz" on a can of tomatoes.
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#3 Old 11-22-2010, 07:10 AM
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ounces of weight, i'd say. or go for 3 1/2 cups (dry measuring cups) measured?
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#4 Old 11-22-2010, 10:13 AM
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I was kinda hoping it would have been something else than weight but I guess not. A Veganomicon recipe for navy bean soup with roasted garlic called for 2 28 oz cans of crushed tomatoes. I converted it to grams (1500-1600 g), and when I made the recipe, the end product tasted like I had just eaten the crushed tomatoes straight from the can, there was so much of it in there.

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#5 Old 11-22-2010, 10:21 AM
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It's by weight.

In the U.S.... 28 ounces of canned tomatoes (a standard sized can) = approximately three cups.

Don't blame us for it though...

Those damned Brits got us all confused in the 70's and now we don't know what we are doing.

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#6 Old 11-22-2010, 10:24 AM
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We love it so much, isn't it quaint? Quick, how many yards in a mile?

I would have done the conversion to volume first, but come up with about the same result: 1 oz fluid = 1 oz mass more or less (not exactly, we couldn't even get that right).

2 x 28 = 56 oz = 7 cups = 1.6 liters which is roughly 1600 g considering tomatoes are mostly water.
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#7 Old 11-23-2010, 12:27 AM
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I hate the cups thing as well. Can't everything just be in grams for solids and mls for liquids??

Sorry the recipe didn't turn out well
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#8 Old 11-23-2010, 02:33 AM
 
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For your recipes, try a 400ish g can for each 28 oz can.

For some things, I'd fight to the death for the Customary system though. 2 cups of flour = way better than "such and such grams". For starters, you have to have a scale, because all flours don't have the same weight, let alone other dry ingredients. A cup is a cup. 15g of baking soda is much more of a pain in the ass to measure than 2 teaspoons.

For liquid volume measurements, it doesn't bother me either way.

Ugh, metric.

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#9 Old 11-23-2010, 05:55 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by IamJen View Post

2 cups of flour = way better than "such and such grams".

Not better than 5 dl of flour.

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#10 Old 11-23-2010, 06:37 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by IamJen View Post

For your recipes, try a 400ish g can for each 28 oz can.

For some things, I'd fight to the death for the Customary system though. 2 cups of flour = way better than "such and such grams". For starters, you have to have a scale, because all flours don't have the same weight, let alone other dry ingredients. A cup is a cup. 15g of baking soda is much more of a pain in the ass to measure than 2 teaspoons.

For liquid volume measurements, it doesn't bother me either way.

Ugh, metric.

I disagree; a cup of flour isn't always a cup of flour. Depending on whether you sift or stir your flour prior to measuring it and depending on whether you spoon the flour into the measuring cup vs plunging it into the bag of flour, the actual amount of flour you get can vary wildly. Measuring flour by weight is much more accurate.

I was born and raised in the US, lived in the UK 2001-2007, then came back here. I've never lived anywhere where the metric system was widespread or universally used, but I find myself converting to it in the kitchen all the time. It's more accurate.

On the other hand I don't like the Celsius scale for measuring temperatures. It's cruder than Fahrenheit. I "get" Celsius, I just don't like it.
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#11 Old 11-23-2010, 06:39 AM
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Yes... cups are wildly inaccurate for flour.
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#12 Old 11-23-2010, 07:25 AM
 
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Pah. How do you get around that wholewheat, white, chickpea, etc. flours all have different weights? The *volume* of flour is what's important in a recipe. Yes, you have to measure properly (by spoon, into a cup). If a recipe needs sifted flour, then it should say so.

Agreed that 5dl is an okay measure. I just never see dry goods listed in UK recipes by volume.

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#13 Old 11-23-2010, 08:09 AM
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So you see, Sevenseas, using a recipe to begin with was your first mistake. No one can even agree what a cup is. Now, if that recipe had been written by my grandmother, it would have just said "tomato" and left the rest as an exercise for the reader. Similarly, you'd be on your own to interpret a "pinch" of salt or a "dash" of oregano. Any measurements would be relative, unnamed units: one of this, two of that, half of another and so on.
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#14 Old 11-23-2010, 10:26 AM
 
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Heh. I tend to follow recipes for stove-top stuff, so it doesn't end up *too* scary. For baking, I can usually wing it. When I cook with the girls though, we tend to follow recipes as it incorporates a whole bunch of skills into this one task (mathematics, reading, etc.) I heard one of them the other day playing "recipe" with her dollhouse!
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#15 Old 11-23-2010, 10:55 AM
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i just looked at a 28oz can of tomatoes and it says 794g on there. that's what i'd go with

what i hate in recipes is when it calls for a small/medium/large fruit or vegetable. that's completely arbitrary
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#16 Old 11-23-2010, 12:57 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by zirpkatze View Post

i just looked at a 28oz can of tomatoes and it says 794g on there. that's what i'd go with

Thanks, that confirms what others have been saying in the thread as well.
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#17 Old 11-23-2010, 01:25 PM
 
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Oops TWO cans.

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#18 Old 11-23-2010, 03:41 PM
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I love cups! I have set of measuring cups and its so much easier to bung ingredients in them rather than fiddle around with measurements, conversion, scales etc.

If a recipe called for 2 28oz cans of anything I'd just presume it meant a normal can size, as in the standard beans tin. Would I mess up? probably. haha. I have no idea if UK cans are the same as USA cans, come to think of it.
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#19 Old 11-23-2010, 03:53 PM
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keep in mind, too, that measuring cups are not standardized. different sets of measuring equipment (cups, ounces, teaspoons, whatever) may or may not measure the same amount. when you need precise measurements for a recipe, be sure to use the same set of measuring equipment for all the measurements in the recipe.

Most of the time, it's not an issue, but you never know...

Nec Aspera Terrent
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#20 Old 07-11-2015, 02:45 PM
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not even spoons are the same

I just found out that spoons have different volume deffinitions
In the US a tsp is 4,93 ml and a tbsp 14,79 ml
In the UK a tsp is 5,92 ml and a tbsp 17,75 ml
and a metric tsp is 5 ml and a tbsp 15 ml

not even measuring cups are the same
in the US 1 cup is 236,59 ml
and 1 metric cup is 250 ml

so I'm following a US recipe using my metric measuring cups and I end up with the wrong amounts

sometimes you can't even tell which cups the recipe calls for

28 fl oz US are 828 ml

28 fl oz UK are 796 ml

the same with gallons
US gallon 3,785 l
UK gallon 4,546 l

the list goes on and on

ml and g are the best, there the same everywhere in the world

I love it when a recipe calls for one rhubarb stalk they just come in so many sizes
and when a recipe sas 2 cups chopped rhubarb how much should I buy?
And when I cut the rhubarb smaller I need more and when I cut it bigger I need less, very inacurate.
I think 2 cups of rhubarb where about 300 g more or less o and that where metric cups but I think the recipe called for US cups.
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#21 Old 07-11-2015, 03:00 PM
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it's just more accurate

Quote:
Originally Posted by IamJen View Post
For your recipes, try a 400ish g can for each 28 oz can.

For some things, I'd fight to the death for the Customary system though. 2 cups of flour = way better than "such and such grams". For starters, you have to have a scale, because all flours don't have the same weight, let alone other dry ingredients. A cup is a cup. 15g of baking soda is much more of a pain in the ass to measure than 2 teaspoons.

For liquid volume measurements, it doesn't bother me either way.

Ugh, metric.
I hate it when i have to stuff the flour into the measuring cup and then into the mixing bowl. It's just much easier to put the bowl onto the scale and just dumping everything in there is no leveling the flour to get it up to the line of the right amount and wholegrain flour doesn't work at all with cup it's just to light and varies a lot.

And for starters not everyone has measuring cups.
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#22 Old 07-11-2015, 05:34 PM
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Does this thread make anyone else miss @Sevenseas too?
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#23 Old 07-11-2015, 06:18 PM
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YES, and everyone else on it--except for CathyB 'causeI don't know her!
Hello Cathy!
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#24 Old 07-11-2015, 06:19 PM
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Happy Birthday Purp!
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#25 Old 07-11-2015, 07:40 PM
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For added fun, try cooking with a vintage recipe. I end up consulting 3 or 4 internet sources before I even have a vague notion how to handle measurements.

Good example: a "knob" of butter. A what now? And I'll be subbing margarine any way.
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#26 Old 07-11-2015, 10:30 PM
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Cool

Quote:
Originally Posted by silva View Post
Happy Birthday Purp!
Thanks, @silva .

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#27 Old 07-11-2015, 10:39 PM
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Metric measurements or GTFO IMO.
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