The Fibromyalgia (FM) Thread - VeggieBoards
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#1 Old 03-01-2008, 09:54 AM
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Do you have fibromyalgia or know someone who does? Discuss here!



Here's some information on fibromyalgia:





Fibromyalgia is a chronic condition characterized by widespread pain in your muscles, ligaments and tendons, as well as fatigue and multiple tender points — places on your body where slight pressure causes pain. Fibromyalgia is more common in women than in men. Previously, fibromyalgia was known by other names such as fibrositis, chronic muscle pain syndrome, psychogenic rheumatism and tension myalgias.



Signs and symptoms



Signs and symptoms of fibromyalgia can vary, depending on the weather, stress, physical activity or even the time of day. Common signs and symptoms include:



* Widespread pain. Fibromyalgia is characterized by pain in specific areas of your body when pressure is applied, including the back of your head, upper back and neck, upper chest, elbows, hips and knees. The pain generally persists for months at a time and is often accompanied by stiffness.

* Fatigue and sleep disturbances. People with fibromyalgia often wake up tired and unrefreshed even though they seem to get plenty of sleep. Some studies suggest that this sleep problem is the result of a sleep disorder called alpha wave interrupted sleep pattern, a condition in which deep sleep is frequently interrupted by bursts of brain activity similar to wakefulness. So people with fibromyalgia miss the deep restorative stage of sleep. Nighttime muscle spasms in your legs and restless legs syndrome also may be associated with fibromyalgia.

* Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). The constipation, diarrhea, abdominal pain and bloating associated with IBS are common in people with fibromyalgia.

* Headaches and facial pain. Many people who have fibromyalgia also have headaches and facial pain that may be related to tenderness or stiffness in their neck and shoulders. Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) dysfunction, which affects the jaw joints and surrounding muscles, also is common in people with fibromyalgia.

* Heightened sensitivity. It's common for people with fibromyalgia to report being sensitive to odors, noises, bright lights and touch.



Other common signs and symptoms include:



* Depression

* Numbness or tingling sensations in the hands and feet (paresthesia)

* Difficulty concentrating

* Mood changes

* Chest pain

* Dry eyes, skin and mouth

* Painful menstrual periods

* Dizziness

* Anxiety



Causes



Doctors don't know what causes fibromyalgia. Current thinking centers around a theory called "central sensitization." This theory states that people with fibromyalgia have a lower threshold for pain because of increased sensitivity in the brain to pain signals. Researchers believe repeated nerve stimulation causes the brains of people with fibromyalgia to change. This change involves an abnormal increase in levels of certain chemicals in the brain that signal pain (neurotransmitters). In addition, the brain's pain receptors (neurons) — which receive signals from the neurotransmitters — seem to develop a sort of memory of the pain and become more sensitive, meaning they can overreact to pain signals. In this way, pressure on a spot on the body that wouldn't hurt someone without fibromyalgia can be very painful to someone who has the condition. But what initiates this process of central sensitization isn't known.



It's likely that a number of factors contribute to the development of fibromyalgia. Other theories as to the cause of fibromyalgia include:



* Sleep disturbances. Some researchers theorize that disturbed sleep patterns may be a cause rather than just a symptom of fibromyalgia.

* Injury. An injury or trauma, particularly in the upper spinal region, may trigger the development of fibromyalgia in some people. An injury may affect your central nervous system, which may trigger fibromyalgia.

* Infection. Some researchers believe that a viral or bacterial infection may trigger fibromyalgia.

* Abnormalities of the autonomic (sympathetic) nervous system. Part of your autonomic nervous system — the sympathetic, or involuntary, system — controls bodily functions that you don't consciously control, such as heart rate, blood vessel contraction, sweating, salivary flow and intestinal movements. It’s thought that sympathetic nervous system dysfunction occurs in people with fibromyalgia, particularly at night, which leads to fatigue, stiffness, dizziness and other signs and symptoms associated with the condition.

* Changes in muscle metabolism. For example, deconditioning and decreased blood flow to muscles may contribute to decreased strength and fatigue. Differences in metabolism and abnormalities in the hormonal substance that influences the activity of nerves may play a role.



Psychological stress and hormonal changes also may be possible causes of fibromyalgia.




http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/fibromyalgia/DS00079

"Yes! Live! Life's a banquet and most poor suckers are starving to death!" Auntie Mame
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#2 Old 03-01-2008, 10:06 AM
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Thanks ahimsa! This thread is a genius idea!!!!
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#3 Old 03-01-2008, 10:14 AM
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You're welcome. Do you have it or know anyone who does? I know some VB members have it or think they do.



Back when I was a teenager, fibromyalgia syndrome had just been identified. Up until that point, those who had the symptoms were treated as second-class citizens, largely because many medical professionals thought that they were hypochondriacs or simply had emotional issues.



It is good to see that more investigation and research is being done in this area.



I was diagnosed as a teen but rarely mention it, fearing I will be judged, looked down upon or not respected in my field for it.



Also, I don't want the diagnosis or the syndrome to define me, so I keep a positive outlook and by not saying "I have fibromyalgia", it allows me to just be me.



That being said, the truth is, I experience most, if not all of the symptoms associated with fibromyalgia 99% of the time, or have in the past.

"Yes! Live! Life's a banquet and most poor suckers are starving to death!" Auntie Mame
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#4 Old 03-01-2008, 10:35 AM
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hmm. I have some/many of these symptoms but had assumed they were all unrelated random things I shouldn't worry about (or in the case of my headaches, SHOULD worry about but don't want to face up to ... hereditary stuff).

not that I'm self-diagnosing or anything but maybe I should actually start to track my problems as though they were serious, and ask a doctor about them.
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#5 Old 03-01-2008, 10:37 AM
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I was diagnosed a couple years ago after 4 years of pain. I don't know anyone irl who has it so I'm quite happy to have found people on VB who do. Talking to my mom is out of the question since she still thinks I'm making it all up. I can talk to my fiance but he thinks he's going to hurt me if he does more than barely touch me. This is not an attitude I want to encourage, even though it's true.



The pain is at a manageable point right now. I'm not totally exaughsted straight out of bed but don't have much endurance. Right now the biggest problem is my increasing inability to remember words. For example, I just spent 10 minutes looking through a thesaurus trying to remember "endurance". I start a sentence but by the time I get to the end, I can't remember the word I was going to use. I don't whether that's fibro fog or some other problem though.



I'm not working right now but when I was a children's photographer, I never mentioned the diagnoses. My co-workers knew I had chronic headaches and something always hurt but I never explained why. They wouldn't have looked down on me but I didn't want to be singled out because of it.
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#6 Old 03-01-2008, 10:40 AM
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actually, reading more about it, I really think I probably don't have fibro. Although the pain is near-constant, it's nowhere near as severe as people with fibro seem to report. I'm probably just being a complete hypochondriac.

But thank you Ahimsa, this post was interesting.
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#7 Old 03-01-2008, 10:41 AM
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Tracking all the problems is a great idea Isowish. Even if it doesn't turn out to be fibromyalgia, it may help your doctor see a pattern of something else. Mine seemed all unrelated until the doctor suggested it. Even he was convinced, I still wondered if we were seeing something that wasn't really there. Sometimes I still wonder but after reading more and thinking a lot about all the problems I've had as long as I can remember, it makes sense.



The pain doesn't necessarily need to be severe. From what I gather, its more important that its constant. Have you tested the trigger points? That's the biggest indicator.
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#8 Old 03-01-2008, 10:43 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gillibean View Post

Tracking all the problems is a great idea Isowish. Even if it doesn't turn out to be fibromyalgia, it may help your doctor see a pattern of something else. Mine seemed all unrelated until the doctor suggested it. Even he was convinced, I still wondered if we were seeing something that wasn't really there. Sometimes I still wonder but after reading more and thinking a lot about all the problems I've had as long as I can remember, it makes sense.



yeah, tracking my problems will be good for my muddled mind. thanks gillibean & Ahimsa for making me think of this, sorry for hijacking your thread!
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#9 Old 03-01-2008, 10:46 AM
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There was no hijacking at all! I hope tracking helps and you find the problem.
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#10 Old 03-01-2008, 10:55 AM
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One of my best friends belives she has fibro and it's really tough for her. She fits all the symptoms and has been to a bajillion specialists- none of which have actually helped her. She's been through PT, done trigger point therapy, massage, diet changes, tapping and a whole lot of other things. Her doctor now is suggesting she do prolotheraphy (sp?) shots and I was shocked to hear the cost, which their very good insurance will not cover.



She's a bright, funny, enthusiastic, optomistic, incredible person who has this problem and can't figure it out. It sux and I've seen her suffer with this for sooo long. I wish there was more information out there, better treatment options, and that insurance and doctors alike recognized this debilitating problem.



Thanks for posting this AHIMSA! I'd would be great if someone had treatment ideas
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#11 Old 03-01-2008, 11:14 AM
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As a side note a lot of these symptoms sound like what my wife was going through before being diagnosed with gluten intolerance. Removing gluten from her diet helped get rid of the pain throughout her body. She will occasionally accidentally get some gluten and have two to three days of the same symptoms she had before. The amount of gluten needed to trigger such a reaction is minimal. She once got a reaction from licking a postage stamp (the glue is wheat based.)



I would recommend that anyone suffering these symptoms ask their medical caregiver about the possibility of gluten intolerance.
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#12 Old 03-01-2008, 11:19 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by asp3 View Post

As a side note a lot of these symptoms sound like what my wife was going through before being diagnosed with gluten intolerance. Removing gluten from her diet helped get rid of the pain throughout her body. She will occasionally accidentally get some gluten and have two to three days of the same symptoms she had before. The amount of gluten needed to trigger such a reaction is minimal. She once got a reaction from licking a postage stamp (the glue is wheat based.)



I would recommend that anyone suffering these symptoms ask their medical caregiver about the possibility of gluten intolerance.



Really? She has had someone suggest she go vegan... not a doctor but a friend with similar symptoms. She hasn't done it and I don't know if it would help (though I suspect it might lol). I'll tell her about the gluten intolerance your wife has- thank you She had someone suggest she may have endocrine cancer (a fibro specialist) which freaked her out real bad. Luckily, after testing, she found that's not the case.
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#13 Old 03-01-2008, 11:21 AM
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My mom and brother-in-law both have it. She was diagnosed at around 40ish and he was diagnosed at 17.
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#14 Old 03-01-2008, 12:30 PM
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I have it. I was diagnosed in 1998. I hate the stigma associated with it...you know, not everyone believing it's a 'real' illness. I've learned to cope with it pretty much. I'm pretty sure it is FM...I was diagnosed by three different doctors, one primary care and the other two Rheumatologists. I tried Cymbalta for 8 months which did help but the side effects (sleeping sickness, mostly) were too much for me to tolerate. I would fall asleep in the car after only five minutes of driving.

I definitely have the sleep issues...and I have zero strength even with regular exercising, which is torture, but I do it anyway. It frustrates me because even going up one flight of stairs will cause my legs to ache. Blow drying my hair is an effort because my arms get tired. Sometimes I run a low grade fever. Weight training is almost out of the question. I do pilates just to stretch which feels good. Aerobics is supposed to help but I find the more I do the worse I feel. So I'm down to 20-30 minutes of walking/trampoline.

I also try not to let too many people know I have it, mostly because it's still considered a 'fake illness' by some. Actually, a family member sent me an article recently which was upsetting, because it said that FM is not real, and that doctors should stop telling people that they have it because it makes them think they are sick when they are not. I'll see if I can dig it up.
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#15 Old 03-01-2008, 12:33 PM
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I am going to the doctors on Tuesday to start the process of screening and possible diagnosis of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and/or Fibromyalgia. I learned about Fibro from doing research on my IC and PFD. IC (Interstitial Cystitis) and PFD (Pelvic Floor Dysfunction) seem to be closely related to Fibro, CFS, IBS and other immune and pain disorders. And I have a history of chronic mono, which is associated with CFS. I've been suffering from fatigue since childhood but it seems to be getting worse every year and now there's a great deal of pain along with it. I also have chronic migraines, food intolerances, chemical intolerances, sleep disorder (insomnia/delayed sleep/sleep anxiety) and sensory sensitivities (light/sounds/smell/touch).



I've found a good deal of CF/Fibro/Pain centers that will treat these disorders but it's difficult to find a doctor to diagnose...from my research you really need to find a specialist in CF/Fibro, as with IC, because there are doctors who don't believe they exist.
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#16 Old 03-01-2008, 12:42 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gillibean View Post

Right now the biggest problem is my increasing inability to remember words. For example, I just spent 10 minutes looking through a thesaurus trying to remember "endurance". I start a sentence but by the time I get to the end, I can't remember the word I was going to use. I don't whether that's fibro fog or some other problem though.



I'm going through this too. At first I thought it was just the result of not working for so long and being stuck in the house (I haven't worked for a year and a half and am agoraphobic). I thought my brain was slowly dying from lack of stimulation. Because it's really not like me to forget things, such as adjectives, proper nouns or important details.



I call it having a case of the dumb.
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#17 Old 03-01-2008, 12:43 PM
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#18 Old 03-01-2008, 12:55 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by isowish View Post

yeah, tracking my problems will be good for my muddled mind. thanks gillibean & Ahimsa for making me think of this, sorry for hijacking your thread!



I agree with Gillibean, you didn't hijack the thread at all! Please do track your symptoms, along with what you were eating, how you were sleeping, what activities you were doing so you may be able to see a pattern. Sometimes (not just with FM) eliminating the triggers of a symptom helps a lot!



It's sad to see so many who have this condition but its nice to be able to find some who can relate too. Bittersweet.



So, here are some of the things that have helped me. I am really big on tracking as mentioned above and being mindful on what causes a "flare" in YOU. What works for me may not work for you and all that jazz.



Diet. Eating a whole foods, vegan diet with little added salt and sugar. High raw is really good too, but not too high or 100% for extended periods of time or I get too cold, can't sleep at all and have some IBS issues.



Yoga.



Yoga, Yoga, Yoga!



I cannot stress how important being consistent with my Yoga practice is and the difference is has made for me. Gentle Hatha or Restorative is best for managing these symptoms, I have found.



I DO tend to be an anxious, hyper aware person who is ultra sensitive. Hey, I know who I am. Yoga has helped me relax, feel peaceful in my body and be pain free, even if it is only for the 10 minute shivasana (quiet relaxation period) after the physical part of the class. I also sleep much better on the days I have yoga.



Cardiovascular exercise.
In a perfect world, I would do an hour of yoga and an hour of cardio (including swimming) every day. It helps that much!



Massage and Bodywork. Being able to receive nurturing bodywork and feel non-stimulating pleasure in my body is such a relief! Sometimes there is pain and swelling, followed by stiffness after bodywork, but if I follow the appropriate protocol, I am fine.



MSM/Vitamin C. These work together synergistically to reduce inflammation, helping to alleviate soreness and stiffness.



B-12, B-Complex and Folic Acid injections. These seem to help with my energy and circulation, amongst other things.



Spices Turmeric and cayenne help to reduce pain and inflammation. I have used these on occasion and like to eat curry as much as possible too.



Herbs. Passion flower, valerian, skullcap and hops teas or tinctures relax muscles, are calming and have pain relieving properties. I make a tincture with those plus peppermint and chamomile. It is quite relaxing.



Homeopathy.
Capsicum and arnical topical gels or creams are helpful for my painful areas. Bryonia and Hypericum are useful too.



Those are just some of the tools I use to help feel better. There's more (like not overextending myself) but this is a good start.

"Yes! Live! Life's a banquet and most poor suckers are starving to death!" Auntie Mame
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#19 Old 03-01-2008, 01:01 PM
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I've had symptoms all my life, looking back, but it didn't really interfere with my energy levels and things severely until last semester. A day or two after I got my third/final hepatitis B immunization, I was in severe "pain" (like a horrible aching when you have the flu) after moving into my dorm that I laughed off as early arthritis and told my new friends I could predict the weather (true enough). Since arthritis runs in my family I assumed I was just having weird pre-arthritis pain or something.



Anyways, my energy levels plummeted from already low levels and in November I was diagnosed with Fibromyalgia. I started taking Lyrica but it made me "dopey" and have hallucinations and fall asleep... by mid December I was on crutches to walk around campus because my legs would be in too much pain the fibro + lyrica made me so dizzy and off-balanced that I was falling at least six times a week.



I'm doing a lot better since going vegan and seeing a chiropractor several times during break, though. I've only had to use my crutches 3-4 days this semester (since mid Jan).



It gets worse when I'm on or about to start my period, when I'm tired, or when it's about to rain. However, I feel "lighter" than usual if it's about to snow, usually, until the cold starts to affect me. Also, I tried to go LO vegetarian from vegan yesterday and got really sick with a flair... no more eggs/milk for me.
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#20 Old 03-01-2008, 01:05 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by isowish View Post

yeah, tracking my problems will be good for my muddled mind. thanks gillibean & Ahimsa for making me think of this, sorry for hijacking your thread!



I agree with Gillibean, you didn't hijack the thread at all! Please do track your symptoms, along with what you were eating, how you were sleeping, what activities you were doing so you may be able to see a pattern. Sometimes (not just with FM) eliminating the triggers of a symptom helps a lot!



It's sad to see so many who have this condition but its nice to be able to find some who can relate too. Bittersweet.



So, here are some of the things that have helped me. I am really big on tracking as mentioned above and being mindful on what causes a "flare" in YOU. What works for me may not work for you and all that jazz.



Diet. Eating a whole foods, vegan diet with little added salt and sugar. High raw is really good too, but not too high or 100% for extended periods of time or I get too cold, can't sleep at all and have some IBS issues.



Yoga.



Yoga, Yoga, Yoga!



I cannot stress how important being consistent with my Yoga practice is and the difference is has made for me. Gentle Hatha or Restorative is best for managing these symptoms, I have found.



I DO tend to be an anxious, hyper aware person who is ultra sensitive. Hey, I know who I am. Yoga has helped me relax, feel peaceful in my body and be pain free, even if it is only for the 10 minute shivasana (quiet relaxation period) after the physical part of the class. I also sleep much better on the days I have yoga.



Cardiovascular exercise.
In a perfect world, I would do an hour of yoga and an hour of cardio (including swimming) every day. It helps that much!



Massage and Bodywork. Being able to receive nurturing bodywork and feel non-stimulating pleasure in my body is such a relief! Sometimes there is pain and swelling, followed by stiffness after bodywork, but if I follow the appropriate protocol, I am fine.



MSM/Vitamin C. These work together synergistically to reduce inflammation, helping to alleviate soreness and stiffness.



B-12, B-Complex and Folic Acid injections. These seem to help with my energy and circulation, amongst other things.



Spices. Turmeric and cayenne help to reduce pain and inflammation. I have used these on occasion and like to eat curry as much as possible too.



Herbs. Passion flower, valerian, skullcap and hops teas or tinctures relax muscles, are calming and have pain relieving properties. I make a tincture with those plus peppermint and chamomile. It is quite relaxing.



Homeopathy. Capsicum and arnical topical gels or creams are helpful for my painful areas. Bryonia and Hypericum are useful too.



Complementary medicine and Healing. Acupuncture, Chiropractic, energetic healing and as many "complementary" and healing therapies as possible are all good ideas as well.



Those are just some of the tools I use to help feel better. There's more (like not overextending myself) but this is a good start.

"Yes! Live! Life's a banquet and most poor suckers are starving to death!" Auntie Mame
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#21 Old 03-01-2008, 02:09 PM
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My mom and my dad both have it, though it's more severe in my mother. Reading through the symptoms/signs, I have almost all of them but figured they were more to do with my PCOS or the brain stuff. Who knows.



Quote:
Originally Posted by gillibean View Post

Right now the biggest problem is my increasing inability to remember words. For example, I just spent 10 minutes looking through a thesaurus trying to remember "endurance". I start a sentence but by the time I get to the end, I can't remember the word I was going to use. I don't whether that's fibro fog or some other problem though.



That's interesting because that happens to me -all- the time. I can't always explain myself well, either. I didn't have these problems until a few years ago. I forget how to spell some words, too, and I'm constantly double-checking myself.
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#22 Old 03-03-2008, 02:00 AM
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Originally Posted by *AHIMSA* View Post



I was diagnosed as a teen but rarely mention it, fearing I will be judged, looked down upon or not respected in my field for it.



Also, I don't want the diagnosis or the syndrome to define me, so I keep a positive outlook and by not saying "I have fibromyalgia", it allows me to just be me.



That being said, the truth is, I experience most, if not all of the symptoms associated with fibromyalgia 99% of the time, or have in the past.





Ahimsa, I can totally relate to what you are saying here. I know 2 other people in my life that have fibro, both of which do let it run their lives, and both of which I personally feel like use it as a crutch for too many things in their lives. For instance, my mother in law is one of the said people, when she says something backwards or drops something, instead of just admiting that she is human and makes mistakes, everything is blamed on the fibro. She hasnt worked in years, she hardly gets out of her bathrobe most days, her house is a disaster..I could go on and on. When approached about anything in her life, she always blames it on the fibro..which to me, helps to feed this misconception about the fibromyagia.



I have found that for me personally, the more I just sit around and not move, the worse my symptoms are. Exercise definatly helps! So it is so frustrating to me to watch someone just sit around and feel sorry for themselves. I rarely say that I have fibro to anyone. I dont want those wierd looks, I dont want people thinking that I am making excuses, in fact, when people do find out that I have it, they are surprised because I lead a pretty normal life.



I dont know what everyone elses thoughts are on this, but recently I saw my Dr who said that there is a new study out that vitaman D deficiency is related to making the aches and pains worse with Fibro. He tested me, and found that I was very low, and put me on a 5000 IU twice a week replacement therapy to help. I havent finished the treatment yet, so I cant tell you if it has helped or not, but I figured it didnt hurt to try.



~Have I mentioned how much I love this place, wow, I just keep finding more and more in common with people here, it is so comforting!~
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#23 Old 03-03-2008, 02:34 AM
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AutumnWynd: I would tend to agree with you about moving around, but when I'm flaring there hits a point in which I'm in to much pain to move-- so the cycle just continues. I also do have times in which I drop things or say things backwards and it IS caused by fibro... I'm not saying that's the case with your MIL, but since you're not inside her body I'm not sure it's the best idea for you to decide whether she's using it as an excuse or whether she's actually been very sick with it for years. I'm sure lots of people thought I was just using it as an excuse or a crutch... Student Health Services was very rude to me about pain meds and stuff, because they wanted me to get out and move around instead of taking things for pain. They didn't seem to get that I was in too much pain to do that! It's impossible for us to know if someone's just being truthful or if they're using something as an excuse.



Sorry, I'm just really sensitive to this sort of thing because I grew up being called a hypochondriac for EVERYTHING I needed to go to the doctor for. I've learned from that that even if my roommate PROBABLY isn't sick and should go to class even though she stayed up IMing people until 6AM, a) I have no way to actually know this and b) it's her life and does not affect me. *shrug*
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#24 Old 03-03-2008, 03:12 AM
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Oh dont get me wrong, I definatly dont want you to think that I think she is making it all up, I am sure she is suffering to a point, its just that you can just tell she uses it as a crutch. I am not the only person that knows her who thinks this. This is also the same person who thinks the WORLD has fibro. She thinks my 8 year old has it when she sprains something, she thinks my husband has it when he is achey when he is sick with the flu, she is just the type of woman that calls unneeded attention to it, which makes the rest of the people that dont have it think the things like "people with fibro are hypocondriacs" is all I am saying. Its very frustrating.



For me personally, it is people like her that give people with fibro a bad rep for being over dramatic. She also is not willing to help herself at all either. I guess I just dont have a tolerance for someone who sits around and whines all the time. She practices nothing to help her, she does not do massage therapy, she does not exercise, she does not watch what she eats, over all leads a very unhealthy life. She doesnt do anything but sit in her bathrobe and pop pain pills. Its just so frustrating to me. I guess you have to know her to understand, so it was pointless for me to have said anything, I guess it just stikes a cord with me.
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#25 Old 03-04-2008, 03:25 PM
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Well, I just got back from my doctor's appointment. She really listened to me, which is rare and kind of awesome and she was really nice. She even said that I had great skin. Hee! I'm glad I decided to go back there (they were my primary's office with my old insurance) even though it was about an hour away in VA.



I had blood taken for a ton of different tests... she's trying to rule out vitamin B12, vitamin D and Iron deficiency (All came back normal last time but the last Dr didn't do enough specific testing it seems), Lupus, Rheumatoid Arthritis, Mono and other issues. She said I also have almost all of the tender points of Fibro. She kept pressing on me, which surprisingly hurt a lot. I'm doing a saliva Cortisol test at home to rule that out as well.



I go back on the 25th for the results and to figure out what else to test for/rule out. Fun stuffs!



Although now I'm in a lot of pain from going out and driving and all that, but I'm still glad I went.
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#26 Old 03-04-2008, 04:39 PM
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The pain is at a manageable point right now. I'm not totally exaughsted straight out of bed but don't have much endurance. Right now the biggest problem is my increasing inability to remember words. For example, I just spent 10 minutes looking through a thesaurus trying to remember "endurance". I start a sentence but by the time I get to the end, I can't remember the word I was going to use. I don't whether that's fibro fog or some other problem though.



I don't have fibro (I think. I've considered it but I don't have the trigger points), but I've found myself doing this a lot lately too. Or sometimes I'll get a word confused with a similar sounding one with a drastically different meaning, and then argue with spellcheck that compellation is a word, because it comes from compel, which means to collect. It scares me, because I'm a writer. For me, I think it's probably because I'm almost always tired and/or headachy and that makes my head foggy.
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#27 Old 03-04-2008, 04:51 PM
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I don't have fibro (I think. I've considered it but I don't have the trigger points), but I've found myself doing this a lot lately too. Or sometimes I'll get a word confused with a similar sounding one with a drastically different meaning, and then argue with spellcheck that compellation is a word, because it comes from compel, which means to collect. It scares me, because I'm a writer. For me, I think it's probably because I'm almost always tired and/or headachy and that makes my head foggy.



It's scares me too because while I've always been forgetful, the frequency is much worse recently. I forget the endings of my sentences at least 15 times a day. I usually remember them within a few minutes but its getting more and more frustrating to know that I have a much larger vocabulary than I seem to be able to access.
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#28 Old 03-06-2008, 03:30 PM
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http://www.drfuhrman.com/disease/Other.aspx (scroll down to "Fibromyalgia can disappear within a few months")
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#29 Old 03-06-2008, 08:29 PM
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http://www.drfuhrman.com/disease/Other.aspx (scroll down to "Fibromyalgia can disappear within a few months")



I generally don't trust doctors or anyone else who makes claims that they can make chronic, incurable disorders and diseases disappear because it's just not that simple. I don't eat any of the things he says not to eat (meat, animal products, fried foods, high sat/trans fat foods, general 'junk foods' etc) in addition to not consuming alcohol, coffee, tea, or artificial ingredients and I've eliminated all foods that I'm intolerant to and my pains have been getting drastically worse over the years.



If the problem were mainly nutritional, I'd be feeling better by now, according to the website. It's easy to take someone whose lifestyle is obviously unhealthy, tweak a few things, and see immediate results. But what about those of us, who although not perfect, are already eating, exercising and living as well as we can? Not everything can be cured by a healthy vegan diet, even though that would be pretty awesome.
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#30 Old 03-07-2008, 01:24 AM
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fibro myalgia isn't a diease... just a symptom. So it's perfectly logical for it to be completely "cured" in some people by diet, or by chiropractic care, or by treating a different medical condition, or by reducing stress, or by going on birth control, or any NUMBER of things.



Doctors find that one thing helps a certain percentage of people with FM... great! That's something for people with FM to try and see if it helps. I know it helps me a ton. But at the same time... a lot of different things cause FM, just like a lot of things cause fatigue or headaches or nausea. Bleh.
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