Wisdom Teeth - VeggieBoards
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#1 Old 02-27-2007, 01:41 AM
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Would anyone like to share their experiences with having their wisdom teeth removed?



Also, how much did you pay to have impacted wisdom teeth removed? I need to start researching surgery soon...mine are impacted and hurt! I was wondering what kind of financing they might have done for you...I am a flat broke college student.
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#2 Old 02-27-2007, 05:38 AM
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If they are truly impacted you should be able to get a med school to remove for you, and offer up an oral surgery resident to do it, instead of a med student. Ask them about filling out a financial form for sliding scale treatment. They probably won't treat this as an emergency unless you have a frank infection, or are in risk of losing your life. Being at risk of losing another tooth is not considered an emergency, since teeth are thought of as expendable, even tho they are, in truth, irreplacable.



Be careful. Go to a good general dentist first and make him think you are rolling in dough and get a treatment plan to save teeth, before you go somewhere where your bank account influences the treatment they will offer. Otherwise they might convince you to remove teeth that you really should NOT have removed. I wouldn't worry about your wisdom teeth tho. It is common practice to remove them if they are causing problems, rather than try to save them. These are the only teeth you should remove, if they are causing problems, rather than try to have saved. You just don't really need them to chew, they are smaller than the other 2 molars.



I had mine removed one at a time over the course of about 2 years. I had all 4 removed by general dentists. They were not impacted, but a couple of them were very decayed and broken down, under the gum, and the dentists spent a long time picking out lots of little pieces. By time I was 30, only one of them had truly erupted nearly completely. The rest were only partly visible.



I had just a local anesthetic each time.. No problems with that. It didn't take an awfully long time to remove any of them.
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#3 Old 02-27-2007, 07:43 AM
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I had mine done all at once by an oral surgeon. My parents paid the bill so I do not remember how much it costs exactly. I do remember that our insurance covered half and that it was somewhat expensive still. When they did it they put me totally under so I do not remember the actual procedure. After I woke up they gave me Hydracodone. If I was not on the pain killer it hurt really bad but as long as I had the codone I was ok aside from the fact that I was all high from the medicine so I was out of school for a while.

You might see if your parents have insurance, a lot of college students are still dependents so you might be covered. If not you might try to get your own.
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#4 Old 02-27-2007, 07:51 AM
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I was already well established in my career with pretty good dental coverage by the time I did mine, so I don't remember how bad it was financially.



As for physically, it was much easier than I anticipated. I had heard all sorts of horror stories from friends and family who took weeks to recover, and one friend got addicted to the pain killers. I just had a local anesthetic, the guy pulled out all 4 at once, and the next day, I was sitting around wondering why I'd bothered to take extra days off from work for this. It really was simple. I barely even used the painkiller they gave me. I was on Advil within a day or two, then nothing a couple of days later.



The hardest part was being careful about not moving my mouth too much when eating or talking for a week or so afterwards. Just make sure you have plenty of foods around that don't require chewing, like rice, smoothies, little chunks of tofu, etc. Basically, anything that's soft enough and small enough for your front teeth to do the chewing. If you don't take a multivitamin, that would be a good time to start, since you won't be able to eat really healthy for a week or two.



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#5 Old 02-27-2007, 07:58 AM
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I had mine done all at once when I was 15. My parents didn't have dental insurance, but I don't think the payment ruined them financially. This was over 20 years ago, so even if I remembered the price, it wouldn't mean much.



The experience itself: I only had novacaine for a pain killer and that was fine. My wisdom teeth were only just coming in, but my teeth were already crowded so they took them out. The lower teeth had to be cracked/broken to get them out. I had stitches which were removed after a week, and I looked like a chipmunk for about 3-4 days and was so numb at first that I couldn't find my mouth to eat. Smiling was a problem for a few days, too, since I was sore. But I didn't have some of the issues with healing like dry sockets etc. that others have.



If you don't have a dental school around, check and see if your oral surgeon will do a payment plan. In my experience, most doctors are OK with that. You may want to try to have a certain percentage (30%?? 50%??) as your down payment so the doctor knows you're serious about paying him.
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#6 Old 02-27-2007, 10:53 PM
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I had four wisdom teeth, all of which were impacted. Before I had them removed they would cause my jaw to hurt, off and on. It would get to the point that I could hardly open my mouth for a week or so, then it would go away and come back again.



I had them removed by an oral surgeon and was completely out during the procedure. Whatever drugs they gave me, through an IV, made me sick. I remember feeling really nauseated right before I went under, then on the way home I thought I was going to vomit. They gave me Vicodin for the pain, but whenever I took it, I would throw up about 30 minutes later, so it didn't really help me much. I spent the next three days feeling very nauseated. My mouth hurt pretty badly for at least a couple of weeks and I had to take a combination of I think Advil and Tylenol (prescribed by my doctor) to get rid of the pain. It was probably a month or so before I was able to eat properly. Also, because they had to cut through bone to get my teeth out, I had a couple of bone chips come out through my gums, months after the surgery. That wasn't really painful though, just weird.



As far as the cost, I can't say, because my parents paid for it.
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#7 Old 02-28-2007, 12:59 AM
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I'm almost 40 and mine never came in (except one which came in about halfway). They're not on the x-rays or anything. They're just not there...



<<-- grateful

Nec Aspera Terrent
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#8 Old 02-28-2007, 02:51 AM
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I got mine removed here in Korea. Each tooth had to be broken into three pieces as they were so big. Only a local for the pain and there was still plenty of pain. Dentists didn't wear gloves. I say dentists because it took YEARS for me to get them all pulled. First one, not so bad, but my jaw was really sore for two weeks afterwards because of the dentist wrenching back and forth before finally deciding to break the tooth. Second dentist listened to me and broke the tooth into three pieces before attempting to pull, but when he was finished and I stood up from the chair, I passed out and went into shock and ended up getting to ride in an ambulance and spend a lot of time in the ER getting pumped full of drugs to counter-act whatever it was that the dentist had given me. Took nearly five years before I dragged myself back into a dental clinic to even think about getting more teeth taken out. Third tooth, my telling the dentist about my previous experiences and that the tooth should be broken first seemed to challenge the dentist's masculinity. He boasted that he could get it out whole. I should have run then. He eventually conceded and broke the tooth, but I could barely eat or talk for more than a week afterward due to a very sore jaw. Fourth tooth got yanked about a year later and was actually not too bad. Went to the same dentist as the third tooth and he remembered me and agreed immediately to break the tooth first.



They had all come out before I was 18, but I didn't start getting them pulled until I was 24. They never bothered me, but they were really hard to brush and I was worried about cavities.



On the bright side of all of this, I only paid about $30 per wisdom tooth...total. And that was without insurance! Cheap in Korea! Despite the difficulties and the nightmares, I do not regret it as I do not think I would have preferred having to pay off the huge bill I would have gotten in America. (the time I ended up in the ER, that dentist covered my hospital bills)



But I do still wish they would have worn gloves. The one who went from an old guy's mouth directly to mine without even washing his hands....*shudder*.



Oh, and although my wisdom teeth never actually caused me pain (that is, until the various dentists were trying to pry them out of my mouth), I did notice a big difference each time one was pulled. Once they were all out, it seemed like my jaw closed better.
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#9 Old 02-28-2007, 06:32 AM
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My mom says she thinks it was about 1,200 per tooth.



I went to an oral surgeon. I was in seventh grade when I got the first two done. I had a huge panic attack in the waiting room. They had to delay the surgery for two hours and give me extra anesthesia. That fear was probably the worst part of the whole thing. I had complete anesthesia (which I recommend). I had good pain-killers and I don't remember ever feeling pain. The stitches were designed to dissolve, so I only had to get one or two removed manually when they took too long to go away (for some reason, getting stitches taken out really wigs me out). I had it done on a Friday and I went back to school on Monday. I should have taken that day off (my parents made me go back) because the medicine I was on was messing with my stomach and I was really tired, but I recovered really fast. In fact, a few hours after the surgery, I wrote an awesome and entirely lucid scene for one of my stories. I did have a problem with something getting into one of the sockets and keeping it from closing, but the funny thing is it didn't start causing me pain until a year to the day after my surgery. Then the surgeon just washed it out with water and it was fine.



I had my other two done along with my jaw surgery, so those were the least of my problems at that time.
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#10 Old 02-28-2007, 07:51 AM
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When I had mine removed, my dentist twisted too hard and shattered one of them. After I went home I had gobs of pain and my jawbone started to push out of it's normal position, so I went back. He had left 2 pieces of shattered tooth in the cavity, and as it healed it was pushing my jaw out. After my second surgery my gums actually started to heal.

I wouldn't do it again if I had a choice.
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#11 Old 02-28-2007, 09:21 AM
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A trip to a dentist (which you can usually do at a medical school for less money) might be a good idea, since s/he can assess the situation for you, and can give you an idea of how urgently you need to have them removed. Mine started hurting (no infection, though, just a sore, clicking jaw) for about a year before I finally got them removed. It was irritating, but it didn't do me any lasting harm to wait. But if you have an infection, it might be more urgent. A dentist should be able to guide you accordingly, and won't set you back nearly as much as an oral surgeon will.



I had all four of mine out at once, including one that was almost competely sideways. My oral surgeon was very good, but very expensive. I was knocked out with gas for most of the time, although they woke me up between each tooth. I wasn't in pain at all during the procedure, but it was really uncomfortable.



I'd suggest the same as some others above: Stock up on foods that you don't have to chew (yogurt, mashed potatoes, oatmeal, etc.), and be prepared to eat those for about a week. Also, be careful about the painkillers you take after the procedure. My doctor gave me Percoset, which didn't agree with my stomach, and there's nothing worse than throwing up when you can't really open your mouth properly. I switched to Advil after that, and found the pain wasn't too bad. Plus I avoided feeling groggy and unpleasant from the Percoset, which I think helped me recover faster. So I guess just be sure you've "tested" any painkiller you intend to use, and make sure it won't just make things worse.



And remember- once it's done, it's done. Good luck!
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#12 Old 02-28-2007, 09:41 AM
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Originally Posted by WonderRandy View Post

I'm almost 40 and mine never came in (except one which came in about halfway). They're not on the x-rays or anything. They're just not there...



<<-- grateful



I'm 33, and mine apparently came in and have caused no troubles thus far that I'm aware of. I had x-rays when I was undergoing my 5 years of orthodontia in my early teens and I saw them.

To my knowledge my sister still has hers as well.



<<<--grateful also.
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#13 Old 02-28-2007, 08:09 PM
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My dad's a dentist and although I haven't had mine taken out (and hopefully don't have to), he said the average cost w/o insurance is about $1500 for each tooth. With insurance the cost would probably be significantly lower.
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#14 Old 02-28-2007, 09:21 PM
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i had all four of mine removed about a year ago...my insurance paid for part of it...i think it was about $2000 total (including what insurance paid for).



they put me completely under (the five minutes before i actually went out were GREAT), and the surgery was very smooth. but then a few days later, i ended up with dry sockets, and those were quite painful. it was at least a month before it didn't hurt to eat, but if you don't get dry sockets, it shouldn't take that long to recover.
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#15 Old 03-01-2007, 06:17 AM
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hi, i must say first i had my 2 wisdom teeth out on the nhs so obviously i am lucky but i have to say if i had a choice ov childbirth pain or the pain once the medication wore off after having them extracted i would choose childbirth everytime!!!!!!worse pain in my life lol
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#16 Old 03-01-2007, 10:04 AM
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"My dad's a dentist and although I haven't had mine taken out (and hopefully don't have to), he said the average cost w/o insurance is about $1500 for each tooth. With insurance the cost would probably be significantly lower."



The cost for an uncomplicated extraction of a wisdom tooth, or any other tooth, by a general dentist, in my area (New York City metropolitan area), cash, is between about $75 and $200, per tooth. A complicated extraction by an oral surgeon, with local anesthetic and intravenous sedation by a nurse anesthesist, or anesthesiologoist, could go reach $1500, but about $500 of that would be for the anesthesist. Most extractions by an oral surgeon, even if there is bone surgery involved, will be under $1000.



A simple extraction is basically a matter of sawing the tooth into 2 pieces, so that one root can come out with one piece, and the other 2 (smaller) roots can come out with the other piece. Sometimes 3 pieces.



An x-ray will generally indicate if there is a high likelyhood of complications. They will show if other teeth are blocking the widsom tooth's path to removal. I don't think "hooked roots" are usually a problem. An x-ray plus a look at the tooth will generally be sufficient to tell the dentist if the tooth has severe decay that will prevent each piece from coming out in one piece, and require extra time for the dentist to pick out little pieces that remain behind.



A simple extraction, not including time waiting for the anesthetic to work, can be done in just a minute or 2. If you have severe peridontal disease - which is the only legitimate reason for removing most teeth other than wisdom teeth - extraction will only take a moment.
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#17 Old 03-01-2007, 10:12 AM
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Dry socket is common in idiots who smoke before their extraction site heals. It can also happen if you eat way too much and dislodge the blood clot, do a lot of sucking motions that can dislodge the blood clot, overzealously brush or scrape away at the extraction site, leave food in your mouth after eating, that stays in the extraction site and decays there, are taking drugs that severely dry your mouth (such as large amounts of antihistamines, or are getting radiation treatment), or if you have impaired ciruclation due to diabetes or whatever. If you are a smoking diabetic, you will probably get dry socket. Otherwise dry socket is quite unusual.



Oral contraceptives slightly increase the risk. While there is some evidence that timing of the extraction relative to a woman's menstrual cycle can influence the likelyhood of dry socket, very few dentists ask their female patients when they expect their next period, or make any effort at all to coordinate extractions with cycle delineators.
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#18 Old 03-01-2007, 10:26 AM
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When I had a second molar extracted I had visible bone. This is considered a sign of dry socket. However I did not have a lot of pain at all. Within a day or 3, new bone started forming a bridge across the hole. It looked like little, fine fish bones. Then new gum rapidly grew in over the new bone. The gums bridged the bone so fast I could see differences in coverage from one hour to the next. I had no sutures or anything. The dentist just pulled out the tooth and left a hole. Nature did the rest.
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#19 Old 03-01-2007, 10:39 AM
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Imagine what it would have been like for an early hominid who did not have tool-making ability, to lose more than 2 or three teeth. That would lead to the end of your life. Teeth in the opposite jaw would super erupt, to fill the space, teeth in the same jaw would flop over at crazy angles. Every bite of food would be difficult, and painful. Your ability to get enough food would be severely impaired and you would die. This would not be the case if you lost a finger (other than your thumb), even 2 or three. Your other fingers would not start altering their positions. Your ability to hold oranges or sugar cane and eat them, would not be severely impaired, if you lost the fingers, but your ability to chew them would be severely impaired, if you lost the teeth. Finger loss would not have nearly the impact on your ability to survice that the loss of a tooth would. Teeth are key to survival. If your teeth don't work, food will never get to the rest of you gastro-intestinal tract. Teeth are key. If you fall and impale your intestines on a sharp rock, you are likely to be able to pull yourself off, and your intestines could heal and after awhile you could eat again. Fall and knock out your teeth, and your problems are much worse.



Teeth are where the conversion ov material in the environment, from non-self to self, starts. It is where non-you begins becoming you. Teeth are key. Teeth, along with lungs, are the most important organs we have. However lungs are the interface for oxygen only, for converting oxygen (Osub2) into you. Teeth take care of ALL the other materials. They have to deal with nitrogen, carbons, and hydrogen. And unlike lungs which deal only with elemental oxygen (Osub2), the teeth deal with carbon, hydrogen, and nitrogen (plus micro-nutrients) in a myriad of compounds, usually very very complex compounds. And they all have very different physical properties from each other. Yet teeth break up ALL of them. Lungs only absorb oxygen.
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#20 Old 03-01-2007, 06:39 PM
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"My dad's a dentist and although I haven't had mine taken out (and hopefully don't have to), he said the average cost w/o insurance is about $1500 for each tooth. With insurance the cost would probably be significantly lower."



The cost for an uncomplicated extraction of a wisdom tooth, or any other tooth, by a general dentist, in my area (New York City metropolitan area), cash, is between about $75 and $200, per tooth. A complicated extraction by an oral surgeon, with local anesthetic and intravenous sedation by a nurse anesthesist, or anesthesiologoist, could go reach $1500, but about $500 of that would be for the anesthesist. Most extractions by an oral surgeon, even if there is bone surgery involved, will be under $1000.



Sorry I didn't make that clear. What I meant was that the average cost that I said above is when it's done by an oral surgeon, (around northern CA), without insurance. I don't know what dentists might charge for the procedure because most don't extract wisdom teeth.
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#21 Old 03-01-2007, 08:10 PM
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Dry socket is common in idiots who smoke before their extraction site heals. It can also happen if you eat way too much and dislodge the blood clot, do a lot of sucking motions that can dislodge the blood clot, overzealously brush or scrape away at the extraction site, leave food in your mouth after eating, that stays in the extraction site and decays there, are taking drugs that severely dry your mouth (such as large amounts of antihistamines, or are getting radiation treatment), or if you have impaired ciruclation due to diabetes or whatever. If you are a smoking diabetic, you will probably get dry socket. Otherwise dry socket is quite unusual.



um, yeah...i didn't do ANY of that and still ended up with dry socket. i did exactly as i was told. your tone indicates that you feel people who get dry socket are idiotic? that's incredibly ridiculous. and name calling equates to energy stealing imo.
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#22 Old 03-02-2007, 02:21 AM
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I don't have any wisdom teeth, and don't have any in the gums, so will never get them. I have had about 10 normal teeth taken out. This was as I was growing up, and mainly to make room for my braces!
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#23 Old 03-02-2007, 05:31 AM
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"um, yeah...i didn't do ANY of that and still ended up with dry socket. i did exactly as i was told. your tone indicates that you feel people who get dry socket are idiotic? that's incredibly ridiculous. and name calling equates to energy stealing imo."



Ar ha ha. No, I don't feel people who get dry socket are idiotic, necessarily. Nor do I feel people who have diabetes are idiotic, necessarily. Or people who have dry mouth due to drugs that they need. I think that people who smoke, esp soon after an extraction, are idiotic, and I've limited my name-calling to such smokers. Smoking after an extraction is probably the largest cause of dry socket. Your tone indicates that you feel people who call such smokers idiots are ridiculous, are confused between people who get dry socket because they smoked and people who get dry socket for some other reason, and are "name-callers." Saying that what someone said is ridiculous, and calling them a "name-caller," is name-calling too. I'm not sure how name-calling equates to energy-stealing. I certainly don't feel energized by calling people idiots who smoke after getting their tooth extracted. I won't feel energized until all the smokers in the world are banished to a single small jail cell in the middle of a coal mine. As things stand now, if I want oxygen to do oxy-acetylene welding, I have to pay quite a bit for it; however people with smoking-caused emphysema are getting the government to pay for oxygen for them, and 50 times as much oxygen per year as I would need to weld stuff.
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#24 Old 03-02-2007, 06:17 AM
 
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Saying that what someone said is ridiculous, and calling them a "name-caller," is name-calling too.

She didn't call you a "name-caller", if you want to debate this silly point, she said that you were "name calling" (which you were).



Perhaps you didn't mean it that way, but the tone in your earlier post came across as pretty accusatory to some.



Let's get back on topic.

The ones I pity are the ones who never stick out their neck for something they believe, never know the taste of moral struggle, and never have the thrill of victory. - Jonathan Kozol
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#25 Old 03-02-2007, 08:28 AM
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IamJen "She didn't call you a "name-caller", if you want to debate this silly point, she said that you were "name calling" (which you were)."



Ah, you're right.



I agree I was name-calling, but I was name-calling smokers, not anyone else, and since Tricia Soup said sh'e didn't smoke, my name-calling wouldn't have applied to her-him.



Almost everyone else, I can restrain myself from name-calling, but when it comes to smokers, I have trouble. It is just very hard for me.
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