any correlation? [between veg*nism and good health] - VeggieBoards
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#1 Old 11-15-2005, 12:49 PM
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(not sure if this is the right forum, but)



I've noticed that since I've become a vegetarian about two months ago, I have not been sick once. Also, since I started cutting back on meat before becoming a vegetarian, I noticed that I became sick less frequently and less-severly.



last night I was thinking about it and wonder if some illnesses and diseases may be a byproduct of eating meat...what if the animal is sick/unhealthy? just a few questions and I'm not sure if there is immediate correlation between the two, but I have also done other things besides stop eating meat lately, which may only help make me become a healthier person.
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#2 Old 11-15-2005, 01:03 PM
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Eating meat doesn't cause commom colds or other minor illnesses. However, many people, when they go veg*an, pay more attention to eating a well-rounded, healthful diet. The average veg*an probably makes sure they're getting all of their vitamins and such moreso than your average omni. Veg*ans on average are probably also more health-conscious in general--they exercise more, drink more water, etc. A health-conscious person is less likely to get sick.



Now if you're talking about more long-term illnesses, such as heart disease, diabetes, cancer, etc., there's plenty of evidence that eating a lot of meat is unhealthy, although in smaller amounts can be fine (not for the animals though). Then of course there is mad cow, salmonella, and stuff like that...
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#3 Old 11-18-2005, 02:39 PM
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Of course going veg*n helps you stay well- overloading on hormones, excess iron & protein & fat (in meats) certainly isn't good for any of your body's systems, inc. immune.

Many people (inc. me) esp. notice improvments after going vegan, because there are very strong connections between dairy & all kinds of problems (ear infections, allergies, gut rot, etc.)
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#4 Old 11-18-2005, 02:42 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Quincy View Post

(not sure if this is the right forum, but)



I've noticed that since I've become a vegetarian about two months ago, I have not been sick once. Also, since I started cutting back on meat before becoming a vegetarian, I noticed that I became sick less frequently and less-severly.



last night I was thinking about it and wonder if some illnesses and diseases may be a byproduct of eating meat...what if the animal is sick/unhealthy? just a few questions and I'm not sure if there is immediate correlation between the two, but I have also done other things besides stop eating meat lately, which may only help make me become a healthier person.



2 months isnt a long time to not be sick. Most people go several months without being ill regardless of diet.



BUT..I do agree that eating more vegetarian can build up your immune system against viruses because you are getting more of what you need to support a healthy immune system.
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#5 Old 11-18-2005, 02:45 PM
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Originally Posted by eggplant View Post

Now if you're talking about more long-term illnesses, such as heart disease, diabetes, cancer, etc., there's plenty of evidence that eating a lot of meat is unhealthy, although in smaller amounts can be fine...(emphasis added)



I dunno, The China Study showed that even at intake levels far lower than any seen in the US, differences in amount of animal product consumed had a significant correlation with incidence of those very diseases.
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#6 Old 11-18-2005, 03:17 PM
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last night I was thinking about it and wonder if some illnesses and diseases may be a byproduct of eating meat...what if the animal is sick/unhealthy? just a few questions and I'm not sure if there is immediate correlation between the two, but I have also done other things besides stop eating meat lately, which may only help make me become a healthier person.



There is a tremendous connectiion between animal husbandry and illnesses. Most of our infectious diseases -- the ones we try to develop artificial immunizations for -- are the result of people living in proximity to domestic animals. There appear to be little relationship between eating hunted animals and disease -- as the hunted animals most often die of their disease before we get to them. Husbanded animals, on the other hand, remain in proximity with us during their illness period, before they die or recover, and thus can transmit their diseases to us. Also, eating too much hunted meat is not good for the circulatory system. Meat from intensively husbanded animals tends to be even worse for circulatory disease.



Diseases known to have come from animals and animal husbandry

smallpox

chicken pox

measles

whooping cough

scarlet fever

salmonella

tetanus



there are many more
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#7 Old 11-18-2005, 03:25 PM
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There is a tremendous connectiion between animal husbandry and illnesses. Most of our infectious diseases -- the ones we try to develop artificial immunizations for -- are the result of people living in proximity to domestic animals.



Yes, all true, but does that mean anything for the person whose most intimate contact with the animal is picking up a chunk of its corpse packaged in plastic in a grocery store, cooking it, and eating it? Granted, eating its body is pretty intimate contact IMO, but how many of those pathogens are actually passed by eating meat? I think they originally crossed the species boundary through the people who were in close contact with them while they were alive, yes?
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#8 Old 11-18-2005, 05:39 PM
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Originally Posted by ilovemydragon View Post

2 months isnt a long time to not be sick. Most people go several months without being ill regardless of diet.



BUT..I do agree that eating more vegetarian can build up your immune system against viruses because you are getting more of what you need to support a healthy immune system.

well that's a good point.



however, it must support a healthy immune system because I kissed someone who ended up being very sick later in the day (and for about another week) and I didn't become the slightest bit sick.



thanks for the comments and thoughts everyone!
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#9 Old 11-18-2005, 08:40 PM
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Yes, all true, but does that mean anything for the person whose most intimate contact with the animal is picking up a chunk of its corpse packaged in plastic in a grocery store, cooking it, and eating it? Granted, eating its body is pretty intimate contact IMO, but how many of those pathogens are actually passed by eating meat? I think they originally crossed the species boundary through the people who were in close contact with them while they were alive, yes?



I believe you are quite correct, most of the risk of contagious disease acquistion comes from caring for animals, slaughtering them and butchering them, rather than eating body parts that have been heated to a high enough temperature to kill pathogens. Still, you can get some contagious diseases by simply handling uncooked body parts. Even carefully cleaned corpses will have traces of fecal contamination. Even when being normally careful not to use, for example, the same cutting board for cutting up animal parts, as for raw vegetables, and when being careful to wash hands after handling animal parts, and before handling vegetables, contamination of vegetables does occur. In actual practice, few people are really scrupulous about handling vegetables after touching corpses. They forget to wash their hands inbetween, or go back and forth between cutting up pieces of meat and cutting up pieces of vegetable so many times within the course of just a few minutes, that if they scrubbed their hands every time they technically should, to avoid contamination, their hands would be raw by then.



But yes, most of the problem is from sleeping near by to animals, walking thru barns, touching things they touched, and keeping them alive when they are sick, rather than getting rid of them as soon as they show any sign of contagious illness -- because they are expensive and wastefulness is associated with fear of not having enough to eat.



Simply by living in a society where animal husbandry is prevalent, and raw animal flesh is passed around, we all risk getting certain contagious diseases, either directly from the animals or from people who got the disease from the animals. Simply picking up and swallowing a piece of heat-treated flesh adds little or no extra risk.
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#10 Old 11-18-2005, 11:07 PM
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Well, many of the resistances to disease come from caring for animals as well. The smallpox vacine was found because Dairy maids were always noted for their healthy skin, and immunity to disfiguring smallpox. ...It was the Cowpox that they were exposed to that protected them.



A lot of people who are veg*n clearly have a severe distaste and emotionally negative reaction to meat consumption. I'm not sure the information you will get will be the most scientific all the time.



For some people meat consumption isn't a problem health wise. But same with smoking and drinking. But if you have cancer in your family you are probably much better off eating a veg*n diet.



There are numerous benefits...



Few people get the Recommended Daily Allowance of Fiber. A Veg*n diet usually meets the human body's insoluble fiber needs.



Soy is believed to enhanse one's sensativity to insulin. Meaning that one is less likely to become diabetic.



Veggies are loaded with anti-oxidants, phytochemicals, and many things that scientists haven't isolated yet, but know from imperical evidense that it has protective effects against heart disease and cancer.



Vegan diets in particular are healthy because plant oils tend to have less saturated fat, and the benefits of monosaturated fat on cholesterol are well known.



On the whole, Veg*n diets are usually lower in calories, so less likely to trigger insulin which is an inflamatory agent that generally progresses aging.



There is a lot of evidense coming out everyday supporting that it is healthier for many reasons.
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#11 Old 11-19-2005, 08:37 AM
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Well, many of the resistances to disease come from caring for animals as well. The smallpox vacine was found because Dairy maids were always noted for their healthy skin, and immunity to disfiguring smallpox. ...It was the Cowpox that they were exposed to that protected them.



If we didn't do animal husbandry to begin with, we wouldn't need to rely on more animal husbandry (such as using them to make artificial immunizations) for producing immunity to the diesease we got from the animal, in the first place. I think that cow pox is simply a version of smallpox, a related micro-organism. Both smallpox and cowpox come from the same cattle. If societies, cultures, weren't in close proximity to husbanded cattle (read sick cattle) as compared to wild cattle (read healthy cattle -- enviroment kills off the sick ones) to begin with, they wouldn't have gotten smallpox to begin with, and the belated and tediously difficult discovery, and production, of cowpox as a smallpox immunizer, wouldn't have been necessary. Duh.
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#12 Old 11-22-2005, 09:01 PM
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In my mind, it's not necessary for veg*nism to demonstrate superior health consequences - parity with omni diets is sufficient, considering the numerous other benefits associated with a veggie diet (ethical, environmental, etc..) That said, I enjoy excellent health on a vegan diet - far superior to my omni associates. I haven't had any kind of illness of any kind, even a cold, for as long as I can remember. Knock on wood
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#13 Old 11-23-2005, 02:44 AM
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I think it depends on the indiviudal. I hardly ever get ill. I've taken two sick days from work ever (in five years). However, I don't think it's to do with being veggie. Everyone I work with is veggie and most of them have taken more off sick than that. It's not necessarily to do with a healthy diet either as I put my hand up and admit my diet isn't that great - most of my colleagues eat a lot better than me but still get sick more than I do (though not necessarily any more or less than "average"). I think I must just have a good immune system when it comes to viruses.



So I think there's probably a lot of little factors as to how often you get sick.
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#14 Old 11-23-2005, 03:56 AM
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So far as diets go, every extreme seems to think they are more healthy, and all of them seem to have "evidence" to prove it, if you want, so I'm inclined to believe none of them.



Probably the most healthy diet would be somewhere in the middle, albeit without fast food and overdoses of chemicals.
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