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-   -   Why are fruits and vegetables excessively expensive in Canada? (https://www.veggieboards.com/forum/120-ontario/148578-why-fruits-vegetables-excessively-expensive-canada.html)

cobalamin 06-12-2014 06:55 AM

Why are fruits and vegetables excessively expensive in Canada?
 
The title says it all.

oatmilk 06-12-2014 07:15 AM

Because Canada doesn't have the ideal growing conditions for many popular fruits and vegetables, especially in the wintertime! Produce prices drop significantly in the spring and summertime because they're coming from local farmers, but in the fall and winter we import the majority of our fruits and vegetables from places like the USA, Mexico, etc.

cobalamin 06-12-2014 08:09 AM

I haven't noticed a difference in prices. I've noticed the lettuce went down to 99 cents each and back up to 1.99 each a week later.

What I notice is that A LOT of produce is thrown out when the employees bring fresh produce. This backwards mentally of raising the prices to make up for the loss really irritates me because these stores are being wasteful. If they would lower their prices, people would buy all the produce available, a win-win situation.

I also don't understand why, with all this land available, we don't plant fruit trees all over the vast land or at least plant the seeds we get from our store bought fruit.

Werewolf Girl 06-12-2014 03:26 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by cobalamin (Post 3320338)
I haven't noticed a difference in prices. I've noticed the lettuce went down to 99 cents each and back up to 1.99 each a week later.

What I notice is that A LOT of produce is thrown out when the employees bring fresh produce. This backwards mentally of raising the prices to make up for the loss really irritates me because these stores are being wasteful. If they would lower their prices, people would buy all the produce available, a win-win situation.

I also don't understand why, with all this land available, we don't plant fruit trees all over the vast land or at least plant the seeds we get from our store bought fruit.

That's not a bad idea, maybe you should lead by example and start a movement :)

Jordy Verrill 06-12-2014 03:30 PM

Are frozen veggies any cheaper? I know they are here in the States. I use a lot of frozen veggies, especially for things like soups and stews and stuff like that.

Naturebound 06-12-2014 04:18 PM

Last week i kid you not I saw a banana plant for sale at a local garden center here in northern Minnesota. Those things are HUGE! I asked a store clerk how on earth they survive the brutal Minnesota winters and she said you have to bring them inside in the winter. And I said "with what, a forklift?" If I had a mansion or room for a green house in my yard I would definitely get my hands on one of those lol . I have a garden to grow my own veggies and herbs but it isn't all that big. I know that there are some local farmers up here who have large green houses they operate year around for vegetables and some fruits.

ellephants3 06-26-2014 05:28 PM

Interesting I've never noticed fruit and veg being excessively expensive here. I have never bought fruit or veggies from the states so i have no comparison.I buy from veggie markets or superstore cause they always have good deals and prices. Maybe places like safeway or save on are more expensive. ?

cobalamin 06-28-2014 08:33 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Werewolf Girl (Post 3320682)
That's not a bad idea, maybe you should lead by example and start a movement :)

or a revolution. [emoji5]
Quote:

Originally Posted by Jordy Verrill (Post 3320690)
Are frozen veggies any cheaper? I know they are here in the States. I use a lot of frozen veggies, especially for things like soups and stews and stuff like that.

They are but they don't nourish my body.
Quote:

Originally Posted by ellephants3 (Post 3334098)
Interesting I've never noticed fruit and veg being excessively expensive here. I have never bought fruit or veggies from the states so i have no comparison.I buy from veggie markets or superstore cause they always have good deals and prices. Maybe places like safeway or save on are more expensive. ?

In Europe, they cost around 1.50cad per kilogram because they grow fruit in abundance.

The high quality fruit, as in big quality apples will sell for the same price as the ****ty apples they sell here in canada.

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LedBoots 06-28-2014 11:00 AM

Any place as cold as Canada is going to have to import much of its produce, which is expensive. Here in Florida, the produce that's in season is cheapest.

Tom 07-09-2014 04:18 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Naturebound (Post 3320746)
Last week i kid you not I saw a banana plant for sale at a local garden center here in northern Minnesota. Those things are HUGE! I asked a store clerk how on earth they survive the brutal Minnesota winters and she said you have to bring them inside in the winter. And I said "with what, a forklift?" If I had a mansion or room for a green house in my yard I would definitely get my hands on one of those lol . I have a garden to grow my own veggies and herbs but it isn't all that big. I know that there are some local farmers up here who have large green houses they operate year around for vegetables and some fruits.

My area is almost as cold as Minnesota, and this past winter in my neighborhood, someone had a really large banana plant (at least 6 feet tall, and just as wide) on what looked like an unheated porch (but the porch was enclosed by windows). Or maybe it was heated. Anyway, it survived the winter and they've transplanted it into their yard for the summer.

A friend/coworker of mine gave me a much smaller banana plant (not even a foot tall) which I kept at work this past winter. With the arrival of warmer weather, I brought it home and put the pot in my yard; it's revived quickly. I don't think I'll ever get fruit from it, but I love the lush, jungly, tropical look of it.

ETA: about throwing out older produce when fresh produce arrives: in my area (upstate New York), older produce is often put on a "reduced for quick sale" cart and sold for much less than the fresher stuff- but it's in such poor condition, I generally don't bother.

Naturebound 07-09-2014 05:49 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Tom (Post 3347338)
My area is almost as cold as Minnesota, and this past winter in my neighborhood, someone had a really large banana plant (at least 6 feet tall, and just as wide) on what looked like an unheated porch (but the porch was enclosed by windows). Or maybe it was heated. Anyway, it survived the winter and they've transplanted it into their yard for the summer.

A friend/coworker of mine gave me a much smaller banana plant (not even a foot tall) which I kept at work this past winter. With the arrival of warmer weather, I brought it home and put the pot in my yard; it's revived quickly. I don't think I'll ever get fruit from it, but I love the lush, jungly, tropical look of it.

Thanks for sharing that! Interesting! Does that neighbors plant produce fruit? I may have to look into this more.

Tom 07-10-2014 03:51 PM

I haven't seen any bananas on it. I think I would have noticed them even without going into their yard or onto their enclosed porch. I don't know how long it takes a banana plant to produce fruit, but I'd guess it's big enough. I walk by that yard quite often, and noticed there appear to be two smaller banana plants planted next to it. If they've been taken out of their pots and planted in the ground, I don't know how they'll get them back in the house come fall, but maybe they just sunk the pots into the ground. Lots of people do that with some of their houseplants.

Werewolf Girl 07-10-2014 04:06 PM

Hey, it could always be worse. Some people live way way up North and can only get groceries specially brought in by plane, you really have to see the food prices in those places to believe it.

I worked on this show Ice Pilots: NWT that focused on a lot of the planes that flew groceries in and it's no joke, absolutely everything was ridiculously marked up just because it's so freaking expensive to even get it all up there.

I found an article about what I'm talking about: http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/...ticle15915054/

Quote:

The outing is an exercise in sticker shock. In the meat fridge, two rib-eye steaks cost $26. Frozen chicken nuggets are nearly $23. The fresh strawberries are just $5, but five ear of corn are $8. Ms. Papatsie stops at the fridge lined with Tropicana orange juice, at $11.99 a pop. “I love those,” she says, eyeing the bright white-and-orange cartons, “but I’m not spending $12 on them.”
Eeek! :eek:

cobalamin 11-04-2014 05:25 PM

Recently I signed up for the PC Plus program and the reward points make up for the prices. I also get an invitation to complete a survey at the bottom of every receipt and they reward me with bonus offers. Today's bonus offer was for example... Spend $15 on fruit and receive 3500 points... Which equals $3.50 in store credit that I can spend later when I reach 20000 points.

Things have gotten better.

TheHappyBeans 11-11-2014 02:56 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by cobalamin (Post 3335410)
In Europe, they cost around 1.50cad per kilogram because they grow fruit in abundance.

I'm not sure what specifically it is you are referring to that costs around €1 per kilo, but there isn't much here (Portugal) that costs that little, unless it is in season. Out of season or imported is more expensive and I guess that is the problem in Canada - you have a very short season and a lot more imports. The big UK supermarkets will often have special offers on a few things that will cost less than 1CAD per kilo, but that is only because they shaft the growers.

sarahsue 11-11-2014 04:56 AM

I think prices for fruits and veggies are expensive EVERYWHERE. I live in Georgia, a state right above Florida. Georgia grows peanuts, pecans, peaches, strawberries, all manner of truck crops, yet I still cringe at the prices for fruits and veggies. When an apple costs $1.99 a piece, people on limited budgets with kids to feed are the ones most affected and the kids need those veggies and fruits the most.
Hence, mom or dad takes the family to a drive-in and loads them up on Kentucky fried and/or burgers with a 'happy meal'.

And the cycle repeats itself generation after generation..
When I take bok-choi or Brussels sprouts out of my basket and the young clerk has to ask me what it is, I know why and it always saddens me.
Btw, minimum wage here is $7.25 an hour.

MushroomToadStool 01-07-2016 06:26 PM

One factor is that food prices will rise significantly in 2016 in Canada because the majority of our food is imported and our loonie is decreasing in value. Of course weather and increased labour costs, and many other factors. Here is a short news clip

http://www.cbc.ca/news/business/food...2016-1.3358980

vegetableheadsfarm 01-26-2016 08:51 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MushroomToadStool (Post 3870001)
One factor is that food prices will rise significantly in 2016 in Canada because the majority of our food is imported and our loonie is decreasing in value. Of course weather and increased labour costs, and many other factors. Here is a short news clip

http://www.cbc.ca/news/business/food...2016-1.3358980

Thanks for posting the cbc.ca news clip. I had actually missed seeing this on the news. Canada does import more food and it's a shame with all the farmland we have, and opportunities to grow food whether it be indoors or outside during the summer.

If people want to save money in the winter months, you have to think and do as the pioneers did to survive our Canadian winters. We can freeze, preserve and store food for winter use. If you can save enough to keep you & your family all winter, you won't need the grocery stores very much.

I found some inspiration from a TV show called Tudor Monastery Farm (here's the youtube link if you want to watch it ).

I notice this forum original question is over a year old, it would be nice to see more people jump in and comment and discuss options that will help everyone. Expensive fruit & veggies is a global problem, but does it have to be?

LedBoots 01-26-2016 09:27 AM

Since gasoline prices have gone down, it seems that the cost of transporting the food should go down, too.

karenlovessnow 01-26-2016 07:14 PM

Someone just mentioned that celery was $9.00 in Canada!


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jocelyn3113 01-26-2016 07:38 PM

2 things;
We have seen an increase but it is being blown way out of proportion. Wherever this $9 cellery is I sure as heck have not seen it just bought a huge bag at Costco for the normal price. Cauliflower has steeply risen but not as high as everyone is quoting.
The low gas prices do not help unless it's being shipped within canada otherwise our low dollar is more then outweighing any low gas benefit.
In 2014 when this post started I was not seeing an increased cost in veg.

vegetableheadsfarm 01-27-2016 07:14 AM

Pricing varies from store-to-store this is true.

At my local grocery store, I've noticed this week strawberries (California) for $7.00 for pint size box - in the summer strawberries range in price from $2.99 to $4.99 (California), Ontario strawberries tend to sell for $4.99, but I can go direct to a strawberry farmer and pay much less if I pick-my-own at $1.69/lb (last summer).

Now shopping around for the best price is always an option, if everything is local (walking distance), but not convenient if driving is involved to get the best prices and shopping from different stores.

Buy from your local farmers is a really good option, for you because you get the peak freshness of the food and at a much better price. Anything purchased at a store can be a week or two old by the time you buy it.

Food for thought. :)

Werewolf Girl 01-28-2016 01:24 AM

I recently tried to order deep fried cauliflower at a local vegan-friendly restaurant but I had to get something else because cauliflower is like 10 bucks a head right now, it's insane!!! I wanted my cauliflower... :cry:


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